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Edited by Chiara Giorgetti

Challenges and Recusals of Judges and Arbitrators in International Courts and Tribunals examines one of the fundamental control mechanisms of international dispute resolution. In doing so, the book assesses procedures, standards and outcomes of challenges and recusals in some of the main international courts and tribunals, including the ICJ, ICSID, the PCA, the WTO, the Iran-US Claims Tribunal, the ICC and international criminal courts. The book analyzes specific grounds for challenges and how they are applied, while also presenting personal perspectives on challenges and recusals from the point of view of arbitrators and counsel. The book also examines regional differences in challenges and recusals. This unique approach allows a comparative view on both procedural and substantive issues, and also provides a clear and in-depth study of specific forums.

Edited by Omar E. García-Bolívar and Hernando Otero

The editors of Recognition and Enforcement of International Commercial Arbitral Awards in Latin America: Law, Practice and Leading Cases present a country-by-country review of the law, arbitral practice and leading cases on the recognition and enforcement of international commercial arbitral awards in the region.

In a global economy where arbitration has become standard for dispute resolution between commercial entities of different nationalities, the enforcement of international commercial arbitral awards in local jurisdictions is the ultimate bottom-line. Yet even with international conventions in place to facilitate the process, practical information on how Latin American courts enforce international commercial arbitral awards is limited.

Organized by country, each chapter provides a relevant overview and guide to the substantive and procedural practice in the jurisdiction. In contrast to other sources of information and databases, the book provides excerpts of leading cases, analyses of relevant laws and international treaties and descriptions of local practice.

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Juan José Quintana

Litigation at the International Court of Justice provides a systematic guide to questions of procedure arising when States come before the International Court of Justice to take part in contentious litigation. Quintana's approach is primarily empirical and emphasis is put on examples derived from actual practice. This book is mainly intended to help practitioners and advisors to governments engaged in actual cases and deliberately avoids theoretical discussions, favoring a pragmatic stance that is focused not so much on what authors have to say on any given topic concerning procedure, but rather on presenting, directly “from the Court’s mouth,” as it were, what ICJ judges actually have done and said over the last ninety years concerning such questions.

Emmanuel Gaillard

Review excerpts from the book on Scribd

International arbitration readily lends itself to a legal theory analysis. The fundamentally philosophical notions of autonomy and freedom are at the heart of its field of study. Similarly essential are the questions of legitimacy raised by the parties’ freedom to favor a private form of dispute resolution over national courts, to choose their judges, to tailor the procedure and to choose the applicable rules of law, and by the arbitrators’ freedom to determine their own jurisdiction, to shape the conduct of the proceedings and to choose the rules applicable to the dispute.

The present work, based on a Course given at The Hague Academy of International Law in the Summer 2007, identifies the philosophical postulates that underlie this field of study and shows their profound coherence and the practical consequences that follow from these postulates in the resolution of international disputes.