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Edited by Rosalind Horowitz and S. Jay Samuels

Written by respected researchers in their field, this book is about the skills beyond basic word recognition that are necessary for the processing and comprehension of spoken and written language. The major topics presented are as follows: language and text analysis; cognitive processing and comprehension; development of literacy; literacy and schooling; and, factors influencing listening and reading.

Handbook of Phonological Development

From the Perspective of Constraint-Based Nonlinear Phonology

Joseph Stemberger and Barbara Bernhardt

This book combines a vast collection of data on phonological acquisition with close attention to Optimality Theory. It blends the studies of linguistics, psycholinguistics, and speech-language pathology in reference to phonological development. It also contains a step-by-step evaluation of competing theories while presenting a complete view of non-linear phonology, including adult grammar, psychological processing, first and second language acquisition, and inter-generational language changes. The authors focus on speech production rather than perception, emphasizing data from the period of real words. The many tables and phonological trees help to make this timely and useful study accessible to students and professionals alike. Among its key features it: addresses the full range of phonological patterns observed in children's speech; surveys patterns of development in children's speech; and provides the only existing single framework for children's phonological development.

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Edited by Dicky Gilbers, John Nerbonne and Jos Schaeken

The present volume includes papers that were presented at the conference Languages in Contact at the University of Groningen (25-26 November 1999). The conference was held to celebrate the University of St. Petersburg’s award of an honorary doctorate to Tjeerd de Graaf of Groningen. In general, the issues discussed in the articles involve pidgins and creoles, minorities and their languages, Diaspora situations, Sprachbund phenomena, extralinguistic correlates of variety in contact situations, problems of endangered languages and the typology of these languages. Special attention is paid to contact phenomena between languages of the Russian Empire / USSR / Russian Federation, their survival and the influence of Russian.

Ilias Papathanasiou and Ria De Bleser

It is now widely expected that scientific evidence and theory should be used to describe aphasia and aphasia therapy. This book provides review chapters on controversial research and clinical issues in aphasia and aphasia therapy. Contributions from distinguished scholars from all over the world (Europe, America, Australia) cover the range of disciplines involved in aphasia, including neurology of aphasia, cognitive and linguistic approaches to aphasic therapy, psychosocial approaches, aphasia research methodology, and efficacy of aphasia therapy. This book brings together contributions of all these disciplines and makes a link between theory and therapy from a scientific perspective. Each chapter offers a current review with extensive references, thus providing a useful resource for clinicians, students and researchers involved in aphasia and aphasic therapy including doctors, psychologists,linguists and speech and language therapists. The papers in this book were presented at the first European Research Conference on Aphasia.

Grammatical Gender in Interaction

Cultural and Cognitive Aspects

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Angeliki Alvanoudi

In Grammatical Gender in Interaction: Cultural and Cognitive Aspects Angeliki Alvanoudi explores the relation between grammatical gender in person reference, culture and cognition in Modern Greek conversation. The author investigates the cultural and cognitive aspects of grammatical gender, by drawing on feminist sociolinguistic and non-linguistic approaches, cognitive linguistics, research on linguistic relativity, studies on person reference in interaction and conversation analysis. The study presented in this book shows that the use of grammatical gender contributes to the routine achievement of sociocultural gender in interaction and that grammatical gender guides speakers’ thinking of referents as female or male at the time of speaking.

English in Malaysia

Current Use and Status

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Edited by Toshiko Yamaguchi and David Deterding

English in Malaysia: Current Use and Status offers an account of the English language used in present-day West and East Malaysia and its status anchored in different linguistic, social and educational domains. After an Introduction giving a bird’s eye view of the status of English in Malaysia, the eight main chapters offer case studies revolving around four themes:
i. linguistic features, with special focus on pronunciation and language contact;
ii. language attitudes;
iii. English in on-line discourse; and
iv. English and language policies.

The chapters cover original data and topics, seeking to draw an accurate portrait of Malaysian English, a non-native variety of postcolonial English that is currently developing its pronunciation, grammar, lexis and distinct identity.

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Robin Sabino

Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket lays bare crucial roles played by community and resistance in the refashioning of heritage languages. Robin Sabino draws on her community relationships, her fieldwork with a last speaker, and research from a range of disciplines, to advance a revisionist history that elucidates the African linguistic resources used to create community in a land those who were transhipped did not choose and from which they could not return. In parallel fashion, the narrative locates the partial appropriation of creole features by the colony’s Euro-Caribbean community in the emergence of local identity. It also traces the replacement of Dutch and Virgin Islands Dutch Creole with their English counterparts.

Includes more than 300 unique sound records of the last native speaker.

Playing the corporate language game

An investigation of the genres and discourse strategies in English used by Dutch writers working in multinational corporations

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Catherine Nickerson

An increasing number of business people are regularly required to communicate effectively and efficiently in a language that is not their own. The tasks that international business writers carry out, have therefore become a recent focus of attention for communication researchers and language practitioners, particularly within multinational corporations where the majority of the workforce needs to communicate both in English and the local language. Playing the Corporate Language Game explores the relationship between context and text and presents a comprehensive framework for the investigation of the communication practices that are currently in use in international business. It includes an extensive survey of multinational corporations in the Netherlands, and it goes on to present a detailed analysis of the genres and discourse strategies that could be identified in a large corpus of authentic documents written by Dutch and British writers, consisting of letters, reports and e-mail messages. There is detailed discussion throughout, of those aspects of national and corporate culture that impact the evolution and linguistic realisation of business genres in multinational, multilingual settings. This volume will be of interest to students and researchers of applied linguistics and business communication, and all those concerned with Language for Specific Purposes, and the interface between local languages and International Business English.

Aoristes et parfaits

En français, latin, corse, estonien et polonais

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Edited by Pierre-Don Giancarli and Marc Fryd

Le présent volume regroupe onze contributions centrées sur le parfait et l’aoriste dans cinq langues : Joffre expose l’ambiguïté fondamentale du passif périphrastique et des déponents latins, tandis que Dalbera propose un invariant à son parfait. Giancarli vérifie l’existence d’une corrélation entre la variation d’auxiliaire et celle du participe passé du verbe corse. Le statut de parfait de la construction polonaise avoir + participe + objet est mis en doute successivement par Nowakowska et par Sikora. Treikelder se concentre sur l’émergence du parfait estonien en contexte atypique. En français, Lindschouw & Schøsler envisagent les relations entre circonstants temporels, passé compose et passé simple ; Vetters retrace la dérive aoristique de ce dernier tandis que Apothéloz se refuse à parler d’aoriste.

This volume is a collection of eleven contributions dealing with perfect and aorist tenses in five languages: Joffre shows the fundamental ambiguity of the periphrasis of Latin passive and deponent verbs, while Dalbera proposes an invariant meaning for its perfect. Giancarli tests the hypothesis of a correlation between the variation of auxiliaries and that of past participles in Corsican. The perfect status of the Polish have + participle + object construction is questioned in turn by Nowakowska and Sikora. Treikelder focuses on the Estonian perfect in atypical contexts. Concerning French, Lindschouw & Schøsler look at the relationships between time adjuncts, passé compose and passé simple; Vetters describes the aoristic evolution of the latter, while Apothéloz explains why it should not be considered an aorist.

Contributors are: Denis Apothéloz, Joseph Dalbera, Pierre-Don Giancarli, Marie-Dominique Joffre, Jan Lindschouw, Małgorzata Nowakowska, Lene Schøsler, Dorota Sikora, Anu Treikelder, Carl Vetters.


A Pepper-Pot of Cultures

Aspects of Creolization in the Caribbean

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Edited by Gordon Collier and Ulrich Fleischmann

The terms ‘creole’ and ‘creolization’ have witnessed a number of significant semantic changes in the course of their history. Originating in the vocabulary associated with colonial expansion in the Americas it had been successively narrowed down to the field of black American culture or of particular linguistic phenomena. Recently ‘creole’ has expanded again to cover the broad area of cultural contact and transformation characterizing the processes of globalization initiated by the colonial migrations of past centuries.
The present volume is intended to illustrate these various stages either by historical and/or theoretical discussion of the concept or through selected case studies. The authors are established scholars from the areas of literature, linguistics and cultural studies; they all share a lively and committed interest in the Caribbean area – certainly not the only or even oldest realm in which processes of creolization have shaped human societies, but one that offers, by virtue of its history of colonialization and cross-cultural contact, its most pertinent example. The collection, beyond its theoretical interest, thus also constitutes an important survey of Caribbean studies in Europe and the Americas.
As well as searching overview essays, there are
– sociolinguistic contributions on the linguistic geography of ‘criollo’ in Spanish America, the Limonese creole speakers of Costa Rica, ‘creole’ language and identity in the Netherlands Antilles and the affinities between Papiamentu and Chinese in Curaçao
– ethnohistorical examinations of such topics as creole transgression in the Dominican/Haitian borderland, the Haitian Mandingo and African fundamentalism, creolization and identity in West-Central Jamaica, Afro-Nicaraguans and national identity, and the Creole heritage of Haiti
– studies of religion and folk culture, including voodoo and creolization in New York City, the creolization of the “Mami Wata” water spirit, and signifyin(g) processes in New World Anancy tales
– a group of essays focusing on the thought of Édouard Glissant, Maryse Condé, and the Créolité writers
and case-studies of artistic expression, including creole identities in Caribbean women’s writing, Port-au-Prince in the Haitian novel, Cynthia McLeod and Astrid Roemer and Surinamese fiction, Afro-Cuban artistic expression, and metacreolization in the fiction of Robert Antoni and Nalo Hopkinson.