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Series:

Adriana Pols

This study examines the correlation between form and meaning of Russian prefixed imperfective verbs ending in -át'/-ját' and -yvat'/-ivat' which are derived from one and the same root (-gotóvit', podgotovlját'/podgotávlivat'). The following questions are discussed: Which factors determine the use of either the form -át' or the form in -yvat'? What is the role of the opposition determinate/indeterminate in verbs which do not express linear motion? What is the relation between prefix and suffix? (-xvalit', vosxvalját', vyxvalját'/vyxválivat', naxválivat').Is there a tendency for forms in -át' to be replaced by forms in -yvat' (prisposoblját' by prisposáblivat') or vice versa (obsú^zivat' by obsu^zdát')?
Besides present-day Russian, literary, journalistic and scientific publications from the 19th century have been examined in order to establish the dynamics of the linguistic development.

Series:

Peter Schrijver

The languages belonging to the British subgroup of Celtic, i.e. Welsh, Cornish and Breton, have been the subject of thorough research for over a century now. Yet the phonological history of the prehistoric stages of these languages and the details of their connection with the other Celtic and Indo-European languages still present numerous unsolved issues. This volume aims to tackle the most acute problems of the historical phonology of British Celtic. Also it provides an up-to-date reference guide to British historical phonology in general, as well as a study of a large body of etymologies relevant to the correct evaluation of the historical phonology. This volume is of interest for the Celtologist, the Indo-Europeanist and the general historical linguist.

Sound and Grammar

A Neo-Sapirian Theory of Language

Series:

Susan F. Schmerling

Sound and Grammar: A Neo-Sapirian Theory of Language by Susan F. Schmerling offers an original overall linguistic theory based on the work of the early American linguist Edward Sapir, supplemented with ideas from the philosopher-logicians Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz and Richard Montague and the linguist Elisabeth Selkirk. The theory yields an improved understanding of interactions among different aspects of linguistic structure, resolving notorious issues directly inherited by current theory from (post-) Bloomfieldian linguistics. In the theory presented here, syntax is a filter on a phonological algebra, not a linguistic level; linguistic expressions are phonological structures, and syntax is semantically relevant relations among phonological structures. The book shows how Neo-Sapirian Grammar sheds new light on syntax-phonology interactions in English, German, French, and Spanish.

Series:

Anna Feldman and Jirka Hana

While supervised corpus-based methods are highly accurate for different NLP tasks, including morphological tagging, they are difficult to port to other languages because they require resources that are expensive to create. As a result, many languages have no realistic prospect for morpho-syntactic annotation in the foreseeable future. The method presented in this book aims to overcome this problem by significantly limiting the necessary data and instead extrapolating the relevant information from another, related language. The approach has been tested on Catalan, Portuguese, and Russian. Although these languages are only relatively resource-poor, the same method can be in principle applied to any inflected language, as long as there is an annotated corpus of a related language available. Time needed for adjusting the system to a new language constitutes a fraction of the time needed for systems with extensive, manually created resources: days instead of years.
This book touches upon a number of topics: typology, morphology, corpus linguistics, contrastive linguistics, linguistic annotation, computational linguistics and Natural Language Processing (NLP). Researchers and students who are interested in these scientific areas as well as in cross-lingual studies and applications will greatly benefit from this work. Scholars and practitioners in computer science and linguistics are the prospective readers of this book.

Series:

Edited by Tanja Mortelmans, Jesse Mortelmans and Walter De Mulder

This volume is a selection of papers presented at the 7th Chronos colloquium in Antwerp (2006), which deal with the expression of modality (in a wide sense), by modal and semi-modal verbs (in Germanic and Romance languages), on the one hand, and by other markers (in languages like Turkish, Tibetan and Japanese), on the other. The Antwerp edition’s special conference topic was the interaction between tense and modality, of which some of the papers collected in this volume also testify. The volume covers a wide range of languages and topics. Specific topics include: the distinction between root and epistemic modality and its interaction with tense and counterfactuality; epistemic deve and dovrebbe in Italian; semi-modals in German; the interpretation of epistemic past modals in English and Spanish; the interface between Turkish ‘almost’ adverbs and the Turkish verbal system; the meaning of epistemic endings in Spoken Standard Tibetan; Korean ‘evidential’ markers teiru and ta and so-called fake past sentences in Japanese.

The Proto-Germanic n-stems

A study in diachronic morphophonology

Series:

Guus Kroonen

The n-stems are an intriguing part of Proto-Germanic morphology. Unlike any other noun class, the n-stems have roots that are characterized by systematic consonant and vowel alternations across the different Germanic dialects. This monograph represents a diachronic investigation of this root variation. It traces back the Germanic n-stems to their Indo-European origin, and clarifies their formal characteristics by an interaction of sound law and analogy. This book therefore is not just an attempt to account for the typology of the Germanic n-stems, but also a case study of the impact that sound change may have on the evolution of morphology and derivation.

Edited by Outi Bat-El

The joint enterprise between research in theoretical linguistics and the acquisition of phonology and morphology is the focus of this volume, which provides fresh data from Hebrew, evaluates old issues and addresses new ones. The volume includes articles on segmental phonology (vowel harmony and consonant harmony), prosodic phonology (the prosodic word, onsets and codas), and phonological errors in spelling. It attempts to bridge the gap between phonology and morphology with articles on the development of filler syllables and the effect of phonology on the development of verb inflection. It also addresses morphology, as well as the development of morphological specification and the assignment of gender in L2 Hebrew. The data are drawn from typically and atypically developing children, using longitudinal and cross-sectional experimental methods.

Series:

Edited by Manuel Sartori, Manuela E.B. Giolfo and Philippe Cassuto

This volume includes the reflections of leading researchers on Arabic and Semitic languages, also understood as systems and representations. The work first deals with Biblical Hebrew, Early Aramaic, Afroasiatic and Semitic. Its core focuses on morpho-syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, rhetoric and logic matters, showing Arabic grammar's place within the system of the sciences of language. In the second part, authors deal with lexical issues, before they explore dialectology. The last stop is a reflection on how Arabic linguistics may prevent the understanding of the Arabs' own grammatical theory and the teaching and learning of Arabic.