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Edited by Elke van Steendam, Marion Tillema, Gert Rijlaarsdam and Huub van den Bergh

This volume provides a state-of-the-art overview of theory, methodology and practices in the assessment of writing. The focus throughout the book is on the construct of writing and its assessment: what constitutes writing ability and how can it be defined (in various contexts)? This question cannot be answered without looking into the methodological question of how to validate and measure the construct of writing ability. Throughout the book, therefore, discussions integrate theoretical and methodological issues. A number of chapters discusses whether varying definitions and varying operationalizations of writing ability are needed in various contexts, such as formative assessments versus summative assessments, large scale assessments versus individual assessments, different tasks, different genres, and different languages, but also different age groups. A range of rating methods is investigated and discussed in this book. The ongoing debate on holistic versus analytic ratings, and the different underlying conceptions of writing proficiency, is a pertinent matter, on which a number of chapters in this volume shed new light. The matter is discussed and analyzed from various angles, such as generalizability of judgements and usability in formative contexts. Another fundamental debate concerns computer scoring of written products. A nuanced discussion of its validity is presented in this volume.

Presented Discourse in Popular Science

Professional Voices in Books for Lay Audiences

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Olga Pilkington

In Presented Discourse in Popular Science, Olga A. Pilkington explores the forms and functions of the voices of scientists in books written for non-professionals. This study confirms the importance of considering presentation of discourse outside of literary fiction: popular science uses presented discourse in ways uncommon for fiction yet not conventional for non-fiction either.

This analysis is an acknowledgement of the social consequences of popularization. Discourse presentation of scientists reconstructs the world of the scientific community as a human space but also projects back into it an image of the scientist the public wants to see. At the same time, Pilkington’s findings strengthen the view of popularization that rejects the notion of a strict divide between professional and popular science.

Scholarly Communication

Past, present and future of knowledge inscription

Brill’s Scholarly Communication offers a new venue for original studies into the mutual shaping of reading, writing and scholarship in the past, present and future. It also welcomes manuscripts that interrogate this mutual shaping with respect to science. The series aims to bring together insights into the literate nature of scholarship and scholarly activity from across the entire spectrum of social sciences and humanities disciplines, emphasizing work aimed at understanding change in reading, writing and scholarship. The focus in this series is less on disciplinary specificities than it is on topical and imaginative contributions to scholarly literacy in the widest sense. English is presupposed.

John W. Adams and Pamela Rohring

This is a handbook for readers who wish to learn more about providing services to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. It provides basic knowledge of Deaf Culture and the hard of hearing population, the aesthetics of American Sign Language, and an awareness of hearing loss and its influence on family and community life. This is a unique book in that it draws from the experiences of a Deaf (Rohring) and a hearing (Adams) author, providing a comprehensive perspective. It draws upon research and literature, from professional practice, and from anecdotal accounts. "Handbook to Service the Deaf and Hard of Hearing" is an essential resource for college training programs, hospitals, health care agencies, hearing and speech centers, school districts, educational agencies, and any one working with or employing deaf or hard of hearing persons. It features chapters containing research and practical information on understanding the primary issues affecting the lives of deaf and hard of hearing people. It has unique perspectives from Deaf, hard of hearing and hearing professionals relative to such topics as language development, Deaf Culture, medical advances in technology, literature, art and drama in the Deaf Community and growing up with a hearing loss. Illustrations and artwork presented throughout the book were created by renown deaf artists. Recommended best practices are offered on how to provide community accessibility to deaf and hard of hearing individuals. Resource section provides exhaustive list of books, articles, organizations, and Web sites in the areas of communication, deaf culture, legal rights, deaf studies and research, educational issues, language, mental health, technology, and more.

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Edited by Suzanne Hidi and Pietro Boscolo

The aim of this volume is to bring together contributions from international research on writing and motivation. It not only addresses the basic question of how motivation to write can be fostered, but also provides analyses of conceptual and theoretical issues at the intersection of the topics of motivation and writing. What emerges from the various chapters is that the motivational aspects of writing represent a rich, productive and partially still unexplored research field. This volume is a step in the direction of a more systematic analysis of the problems as well as an effort to present and compare various models, perspectives and methods of motivation and writing. It addresses the implications of writing instruction based on the 2 main approaches to writing research: cognitive and socio-cultural. It provides systematic analysis of the various models, perspectives, and methods of motivation and writing. It brings together the international research available in this burgeoning field.

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Edited by Luuk van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten and Christophe Neuwirth

Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. The book is divided into five sections, covering major areas of research: writing modes and writing environments (e.g. speech technology), writing and communication (e.g. hypervideos), digital tools for writing research (e.g. web analysis tools, keystroke logging and eye-tracking), writing in online educational environments (e.g. collaborative writing in L2), and social and philosophical aspects of writing and digital media (e.g. CMC, electronic literacy and the global digital divide).In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a variety of disciplines, each chapter provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in the field and suggests directions for future research.

Tradition and Innovation in Biblical Interpretation

Studies Presented to Professor Eep Talstra on the Occasion of his Sixty-Fifth Birthday

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Edited by Wido Th. van Peursen and Janet Dyk

The theme of this volume in honour of Eep Talstra is ‘Tradition and Innovation in Biblical Interpretation’, with an emphasis on the innovative role of computer-assisted textual analysis. It focusses on the role of tradition in biblical interpretation and of the innovations brought about by ICT in reconsidering existing interpretations of texts, grammatical concepts, and lexicographic practices. Questions addressed include: How does the role of exegesis as the ‘clarification of one’s own tradition, in order to understand choices and preferences’ (Talstra) relate to the critical role which Scripture has towards this tradition? How does the indebtedness to tradition of computer-driven philology relate to its innovative character? And how does computer-assisted analysis of the biblical texts lead to new research methods and results?

Playing the corporate language game

An investigation of the genres and discourse strategies in English used by Dutch writers working in multinational corporations

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Catherine Nickerson

An increasing number of business people are regularly required to communicate effectively and efficiently in a language that is not their own. The tasks that international business writers carry out, have therefore become a recent focus of attention for communication researchers and language practitioners, particularly within multinational corporations where the majority of the workforce needs to communicate both in English and the local language. Playing the Corporate Language Game explores the relationship between context and text and presents a comprehensive framework for the investigation of the communication practices that are currently in use in international business. It includes an extensive survey of multinational corporations in the Netherlands, and it goes on to present a detailed analysis of the genres and discourse strategies that could be identified in a large corpus of authentic documents written by Dutch and British writers, consisting of letters, reports and e-mail messages. There is detailed discussion throughout, of those aspects of national and corporate culture that impact the evolution and linguistic realisation of business genres in multinational, multilingual settings. This volume will be of interest to students and researchers of applied linguistics and business communication, and all those concerned with Language for Specific Purposes, and the interface between local languages and International Business English.

The Arabic Script in Africa

Studies in the Use of a Writing System

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Edited by Meikal Mumin and Kees Versteegh

The Arabic script in Africa contains sixteen papers on the past and present use of Arabic script to write African languages. These writing traditions, which are sometimes collectively referred to as Ajami, are discussed for single or multiple languages, with examples from all major linguistic phyla of Africa but one (Khoisan), and from all geographic areas of Africa (North, West, Central, East, and South Africa), as well as a paper on the Ajami heritage in the Americas. The papers analyze (ethno-) historical, literary, (socio-) linguistic, and in particular grammatological aspects of these previously understudied writing traditions and exemplify their range and scope, providing new data for the comparative study of writing systems, literacy in Africa, and the history of (Islam in) Africa.

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Michael Sharkey

This volume contains a selection of the Australian poet Michael Sharkey’s uncollected essays and occasional writings on poetics and poets, chiefly Australian and New Zealand. Reviews and conversations with other poets highlight Sharkey’s concern with preserving and interrogating cultural memory and his engagement with the practice and championing of poetry. Poets discussed range from Lord Byron to colonial-era and early-twentieth-century poets (Francis Adams, David McKee Wright, and Zora Cross), under-represented Australian women poets of World War I, traditionalists and experimentalists, including several ‘New Australian Poetry’ activists of the 1970s, and contemporary Australian and New Zealand poets. Writings on poetics address form and tradition, the teaching and reception of poetry, and canon-formation. The collection is culled from commissioned and occasional contributions to anthologies of practical poetics, journals devoted to literary and cultural history and book reviewing, as well as newspaper and small-magazine features from the 1980s to the present. The writing reflects Sharkey’s poetic practice and pedagogy relating to the teaching of literature, rhetorical analysis, cultural studies, and writing in universities, schools, and cultural organizations in Australia, New Zealand, China, and Germany. It also evidences Sharkey’s familiarity with literatures written in English and his wider career in publishing, editing, free-lance journalism, and the promotion of Australian and New Zealand literature, especially poetry.