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Tibeto-Mongolica Revisited

With a New Introduction and Selected Papers on Tibetan Linguistics

András Róna-Tas

Based on the Tibetan loanwords in an archaic Mongolic language, the author reconstructed an unknown Tibetan dialect which pertains to the North Eastern Archaic Tibetan group. The result is compared with the data known from other NEAT dialects, with the material of the West Archaic Tibetan languages such as Balti, Purig and Ladak, and also with the non-archaic dialects from Central Tibet and Lhasa. With the use of Literary Tibetan and data from Old Tibetan, Tibeto-Mongolica proposes a new approach to the reconstruction of the history of the Tibetan language. Originally published in 1966, and long out of print, the book has served as a standard handbook for historical Tibetan studies for several generations of scholars and is now updated by a new Introduction and enhanced by reprints of a selection of the author’s relevant Tibetological papers.

Al-Rabghūzī, The Stories of the Prophets (2 vols.)

Qiṣaṣ al-Anbiyā’: An Eastern Turkish Version (Second Edition)

Edited by H.E. Boeschoten and J. O'Kane

A first edition of The Stories of the Prophets, written in Khwarezmian Turkish by the judge ( qāḍī) Rabghūzī and completed in 1311, was published in 1995 by a group of authors. For the second edition H.E. Boeschoten and J. O’Kane have thoroughly revised both the text edition and the translation volume on the basis of additional manuscripts and reviews of the first edition.

The Stories of the Prophets ( Qiṣaṣ al-Anbiyā’) is a traditional genre in Islamic literature. Such a work contains the res gestae of the biblical prophets and stories about other personalities and peoples up to the birth of the Prophet Muḥammed. Exceptionally, Rabghūzī’s Stories also contains a sizable account of the life of Muḥammed and his family. The work is a fundamental source both for Turkic linguistics and for Islamic Studies.

Latin at the Crossroads of Identity

The Evolution of Linguistic Nationalism in the Kingdom of Hungary

Series:

Gábor Almási and Lav Šubarić

From the late 18th century in the multi-ethnic Kingdom of Hungary, new language-based national identities came to dominate over those that had previously been constructed on legal, territorial, or historical basis. While the Hungarian language struggled to emancipate itself, the roles and functions of Latin (the official language until 1844) were changing dramatically. Latin held a different significance for varying segments of society, from being the essential part of an individual identity to representing an obstacle to “national survival”; from guaranteeing harmony between the different linguistic communities to hindering change, social and political justice. This pioneering volume aims to highlight the ways language debates about Latin and Hungarian contributed to the creation of new identities and ideologies in Central Europe.

Contributors include Gábor Almási, Per Pippin Aspaas, Piroska Balogh, Henrik Hönich, László Kontler, István Margócsy, Alexander Maxwell, Ambrus Miskolczy, Levente Nagy, Nenad Ristović, Andrea Seidler, Teodora Shek Brnardić, Zvjezdana Sikirić Assouline, and Lav Šubarić

Introduction to Altaic Philology

Turkic, Mongolian, Manchu

Series:

Igor de Rachewiltz and Volker Rybatzki

There are many excellent books dealing with Old Turkic, Preclassical and Classical Mongolian and Literary Manchu individually, but none providing in a single volume a comprehensive survey of all the three major Altaic languages. The present volume attempts to fill this gap; at the same time it reviews also the much debated Altaic Hypothesis. The book is intended for use by students at university level as well as by general readers with a basic knowledge of linguistics. The 39 language texts analysed in the volume are discussed within their historical and cultural context, thus vastly enlarging the scope of the purely linguistic investigation.

A Grammar of Guìqióng

A Language of Sichuan

Series:

Li Jiang

In A Grammar of Guìqióng, Jiāng Lì describes the grammar of Guìqióng, a hitherto undocumented language spoken by alpine people in Kāngdìng county, China. Guìqióng has a lot to offer in its phonology, verbal and nominal morphology, syntax and glossary, distinguishing itself from the neighbouring Tibetan, Chinese, Qiangic and Loloish languages.
The newly discovered features of Guìqióng include breathy vs. modal voice, indefinite number, ablative, ergative, instrumental, dative and genitive case markers, topic and emphatic markers, the diminutive suffixes, the pronominal and deictic systems, demonstratives and numerals, a rich store of differentiated copular verbs expressing equationality, inchoative, animacy vs. inanimacy, dependent existence and negation, verbal affixes indicating directions, present tense of experienced perceptions, gnomic tense, perfective vs. imperfective aspect, modality and evidentiality.

Series:

Edited by Ildikó Bellér-Hann, Birgit N. Schlyter and Jun Sugawara

Building on the rich scholarly legacy of Gunnar Jarring, the Swedish Turkologist and diplomat, the fourteen contributions by sixteen authors representing a variety of disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences provide an insight into ongoing research trends in Uyghur and Xinjiang Studies. In one way or other all the chapters explore how new research in the fields of history, linguistics, anthropology and folklore can contribute to our understanding of Xinjiang’s past and present, simultaneously pointing to those social and knowledge practices that Uyghurs today can claim as part of their traditions in order to reproduce and perpetuate their cultural identity.
Contributors include: Ildikó Bellér-Hann, Rahile Dawut, Arienne Dwyer, Fredrik Fällman, Chris Hann, Dilmurat Mahmut, Takahiro Onuma, Alexandre Papas, Eric Schluessel, Birgit Schlyter, Joanne Smith Finley, Rune Steenberg Jun Sugawara, Äsäd Sulaiman, Abdurishid Yakup, Thierry Zarcone.