Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Archaeology, Art & Architecture x
Clear All

Sinan's Autobiographies

Five Sixteenth-Century Texts

Series:

Howard Crane and Esra Akin

The sixteenth-century Ottoman architect Sinan is today universally recognized as the defining figure in the development of the classical Ottoman style. In addition to his vast oeuvre, he left five remarkable autobiographical accounts, the Adsız Risale, the Risāletü'l-Miʿmāriyye, Tuḥfetü'l-Miʿmārīn, Teẕkiretü'l-Ebniye and Teẕkiretü’l-Bünyān, that provide details of his life and works. Based on information dictated by Sinan to his poet-painter friend Mustafa Saʿi Çelebi shortly before his death, these accounts exist in multiple manuscript versions in libraries in Istanbul, Ankara, and Cairo.
The present volume contains critical editions of all five texts along with transcriptions, annotated translations, and facsimiles of the most important variant versions; and an introductory essay that analyzes the various surviving manuscripts, reconstructs their histories, and establishes the relationships between them; and a preface that considers the sources, themes, and broader implications of the five autobiographies.

Muqarnas, Volume 8

K. A. C. Creswell and His Legacy

Series:

Edited by Grabar

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In Muqarnas articles are published on all aspects of Islamic visual culture, historical and contemporary, as well as articles dealing with unpublished textual primary sources.

Series:

Sheila Blair

Inscriptions on buildings are a distinctive feature of Islamic architecture, and this book studies the 79 surviving monumental inscriptions in the Iranian world from the first five centuries of the Muslim era (A.D. 622-1106), the period in which all the major trends of monumental epigraphy in the area were set.
These foundation, commemorative, and funerary texts come from the region between Iraq and Soviet Central Asia. Written primarily in Arabic, they embellished architectural monuments and furnishings whose nature implies the construction of major buildings. An extended introduction discusses such general topics as titulature, patronage, and stylistic development. Each text is then presented individually with photographs, drawings, transcriptions, translations and an extensive commentary, which presents the inscription in its larger palaeographic and historical contexts.

Muqarnas, Volume 25

Frontiers of Islamic Art and Architecture: Essays in Celebration of Oleg Grabar's Eightieth Birthday. The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture Thirtieth Anniversary Special Volume

Series:

Edited by Gülru Necipoglu

Muqarnas is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In Muqarnas articles are being published on all aspects of Islamic visual culture, historical and contemporary, as well as articles dealing with unpublished textual primary sources.

Marble Past, Monumental Present

Building with Antiquities in the Mediaeval Mediterranean

Series:

Michael Greenhalgh

A broad survey of the various structural and decorative uses of marble and antiquities throughout the Mediterranean during the Millennium following the Emperor Constantine. The heavy footprint of Roman civic and religious architecture helped provide attractive and luxurious building materials, re-used to construct diverse and often sophisticated monuments. The book argues that marble-rich sites and cities around this lake were linked at various times and in varying degrees by trade, pilgrimage, war and diplomacy, as well as by the imperatives of religion - Venice to Alexandria, Damascus to Córdoba. Aachen makes less sense without reference to Rome or Jerusalem; Damascus without Kairouan; Istanbul without Cairo. To accompany the illustrations in the text, the DVD at the back of the book contains over 5,000 images, together with discussions which extend various arguments in the printed book.

Series:

Edited by Jeroen Goudeau, Mariette Verhoeven and Wouter Weijers

In The Imagined and Real Jerusalem in Art and Architecture specialists in various fields of art history, from Early Christian times to the present, articulate a variety of cultural, religious and political implications of the visualization of Jerusalem. This collection of essays calls attention to two axes emerging from the study of Jerusalem in art: on the one hand, the volatile contemporary situation, and on the other hand, the abiding chain of meanings that history imparts to the city. From a contemporary perspective and within a broad historical context, the book discusses in depth a series of Western artworks, artefacts, and buildings providing new insights into memory processes and mechanisms of representation of Jerusalem.

Facts and Artefacts - Art in the Islamic World

Festschrift for Jens Kröger on his 65th Birthday

Series:

Edited by Annette Hagedorn and Avinoam Shalem

The scholarly search on the art of the object is of enduring interest and enjoys a new renaissance in the last few years. This book mainly explores the art and craft of Islamic artefacts and presents to the reader a diverse range of approaches. Despite this variety, in which also artefacts of the pre-Islamic, period as well as 'orientalized' European artefacts of the modern era are included, there is an overarching theme – the linking of the interpretation of objects and their specific aesthetics to textual sources and the aim of setting them in historical and artistic context.
In this impressive collection honouring the German scholar of Islamic art Jens Kröger on his 65th birthday, Avinoam Shalem and Annette Hagedorn bring together contributions from a highly distinguished group of scholars of Asiatic, Sasanian, Islamic as well as European art history. Unpublished artefacts and new interpretations are presented in this book.

Series:

Michael Greenhalgh

Syria's Monuments: their Survival and Destruction examines the fate of the various monuments in Syria (including present-day Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine/Israel) from Late Antiquity to the fall of the Ottoman Empire in the early 20th century. It examines travellers’ accounts, mainly from the 17th to 19th centuries, which describe religious buildings and housing in numbers and quality unknown elsewhere. The book charts the reasons why monuments lived or died, varying from earthquakes and desertification to neglect and re-use, and sets the political and social context for the Empire’s transformation toward a modern state, provoked by Western trade and example. An epilogue assesses the impact of the recent civil war on the state of the monuments, and strategies for their resurrection, with plentiful references and web links.

Anna Contadini

The Kitāb Naʿt al-Ḥayawān is the earliest of a group of illustrated manuscripts dealing with the characteristics of animals and their medicinal uses. The present study considers both the confluence of textual traditions within this work and the stylistic and iconographic relationships of its illustrations, which make it a key witness to early thirteenth-century Arab painting. After a re-evaluation of previous approaches, emphasis is placed on relating image to text, on stylistic affiliations, and on the modalities of production, supported by technical analyses undertaken for the first time. In elucidating the particular context of this unique manuscript, the study contributes to our understanding of a critical period in the development of Middle Eastern painting and art.

The Coins of Herod

A Modern Analysis and Die Classification

Series:

Donald Tzvi Ariel and Jean-Philippe Fontanille

Herod, ruler of Judea at a pivotal time (40–4 BCE) in the region’s history, was Rome’s most famous client king. In this volume, Herod’s coinage benefits from a comprehensive reappraisal. The coins and dies have been thoroughly examined, resulting in innovative iconographic and technological interpretations. Study of the coins’ presence in hoards, their archaeological contexts and geographical distribution, together with other typological, epigraphic and numismatic observations, have aided in establishing that all of the types were minted in Jerusalem. A new relative chronology of Herod’s dated and undated coins is the most important by-product of this study. Finally, an attempt is made to peg this seriation to known events within the king’s reign.