Search Results

Edited by Boeschoten and Verhoeven

Over the past decade Turkish linguistics has become a lively field of study, one that promises to yield new insights into the nature of the structure and use of the language. In the present volume an attempt is made to provide a basic understanding of current studies in the field. After a short introduction into the subject of modern Turkish, the following topics are dealt with by specialists of the specific disciplines: phonology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition and language variation. Thus, the subject matter of the book is not restricted to structural aspects. Attention is also given to the development and use of the linguistic code both in Turkey and in the diaspora context experienced by Turkish families in Western and Northern Europe.
The book aims at offering advanced students of both turkology and general linguistics an introduction to current research interests in the field of synchronic Turkish linguistics.

Series:

Stetkevych

Foremost among the poetic accomplishments of the "Abbasid age was the sudden flowering of a highly rhetorical and strikingly modern style of poetry , termed "badī'." It found its most radical and controversial exponent in the celebrated panegyrist to the courts of al-Ma'mūn and al-Mu'tasim, Abū Tammām Habīb ibn Aws Al- Tā'ī.
The present study offers a reevaluation of the Arabic literary dispute over Abū Tammām and badī'. It then proposes a redefinition of his diwan and of his major anthology, the Hamāsah, as a metapoesis that served to decode the poetic tradition of the pre-Islamic desert for the Islamic 'Abasid caliph and his urbane and urban courtiers and subjects, and conversely, to encode contemporary Arab-Islamic political experiences in classical form.
This book is extensively illustrated with original translations.

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. This activity resulted in the incorporation and reorganization of the classical heritage in the new civilization which, using Arabic, spread with Islam.
A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical and rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of the translations. It is based on the glossaries included in text editions, both published and unpublished, and on other materials gleaned from various sources. The work is published in fascicules of 128 pages of lexical entries plus indexes of the Greek-Arabic correspondences, of Greek proper names and transliterated words, of variant Greek and Arabic passages, and of the Greek authors cited in the context passages. From the second fascicule onwards the indexes are cumulative.
A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is an indispensable reference tool for the study and understanding of Arabic scientific and philosophical language and literature. It facilitates the preparation of future editions of Arabic texts translated directly from the Greek, as well as of works originally composed in Arabic but based on the translations. It contributes to our knowledge of the vocabulary and syntax of Classical and Middle Arabic, of the thought and methods of the translators and of the nature of the translation activity into Arabic methods of the translators and of the nature of the translation activity into Arabic as a whole, and of the way a new vocabulary may develop in an existing language.
Moreover, the Greek-Arabic glossary in general and the index of variant Greek passages in particular will assist in future editions of the Greek text of the works translated into Arabic. These provide information, in a way that can be used by classical scholars who do not know Arabic, on the readings of the manuscripts which were used by the Arab translators and which antedate by more than two centuries the Greek manuscripts actually extant. The work further contributes to our knowledge of the vocabulary of Classical and Middle Greek and of the reception and reading of classical Greek works in late antiquity and pre-Photian Byzantine literature.

Series:

Mohssen Esseesy

Previous scholarship on Arabic prepositions typically has presented these as a static closed class of words. Inevitably, such a treatment does not take into account the diachronic development of prepositions into new functions in syntax, semantics and discourse. The present study applies grammaticalization theory to the analysis of prepositions and subordinators across varieties of Arabic. It goes beyond the traditional single-word focus and treats prepositions as parts of multiword complexes. Drawing upon a sizeable base of authentic historical and present-day Arabic data, it presents a rigorously descriptive and quantitative analysis of evolutionary processes involving prepositional forms and subordinators.

Approaches to Arabic Linguistics

Presented to Kees Versteegh on the Occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday

Series:

Edited by Harald Motzki and Everhard Ditters

For a lifetime Kees Versteegh played a leading role in Arabic linguistics, dialects (diglossia, creolization, pidginization), the history of Arabic grammar, and other fields related to Arabic. From among his global contacts, colleagues contributed to a Liber Amicorum in appreciation of his stimulating efforts to reopen, deepen and complete our knowledge of Arabic Grammar and Linguistics.
In three sections, History, Linguistics and Dialects, 27 contributors discuss (alphabetically): bilingual verb construction; contractual language; current developments; language description; language use; lexicology; organization of language; pause; sentence types; and specific topics: ʾallaḏī; featuring; government; homonymy; ʾiḍmār; inflection; maṣdar; the origin of grammatical tradition; variety conflicts; and verbal schematic (ir)regularities; waqf; and ẓarf.

Loan Verbs in Maltese

A Descriptive and Comparative Study

Series:

Manwel Mifsud

Severed from its parent language and from the other vernaculars, as well as from the Islamic culture and religion, the peripheral Arabic dialect of Malta has for the last nine centuries been exposed to large-scale contact with Medieval Sicilian, Italian and, later, English. Modern Maltese thus incorporates a great mass of borrowed words.
This volume is a description of the processes by which Romance and English loan verbs have been integrated to varying degrees into the Arabic structure of Maltese morphology. It also proposes a typological classification of borrowed verbs in a continuum ranging from fully-integrated types to practically “undigested” loans.
The contact situation described here is of special interest both to Arabists and to scholars with an interest in language contact phenomena, especially in view of the basic incongruence between the languages involved, the long period of contact, and the small area in which it occurred.

A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex)

Fascicle 9, bdn - brhn

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations. It is an indispensable reference tool for the study and understanding of Arabic scientific and philosophical language and literature, and for the knowledge of the vocabulary of Classical and Middle Greek and the reception and reading of classical Greek works in late antiquity and pre-Photian Byzantine literature.

Series:

John Hunwick

The fourth volume of Arabic Literature of Africa deals with the scholarly and literary production of authors from Mali, Senegal, Guinea, Niger, and Ghana, from earliest times to the present day. The work is arranged both regionally and chronologically, and writers are grouped within chapters according to ethnic, scholarly, or religious affiliations. A biography of each author is given where possible, before the list of his or her writings.
For each author is given a list of known writings, with details of existing manuscript copies, published editions and translations.
There are indexes of authors, titles, first lines of poetry, and a general index, as well as a bibliography of all works referred to in the volume. An initial overview and chapter introductions provide an outline history of Islamic learning in the region.

A Lexicon of al-Farrā’'s Terminology in his Qur’ān Commentary

With Full Definitions, English Summaries, and Extensive Citations

Series:

Kinberg

Al-Farrā’'s philological commentary, Ma‘ānī l-Qur’ān, dating from the beginning of the 9th century, is a rich source for Qur’ān readings, Qur’ān codices, Qur’ān commentary, Arabic lexicography and grammar. This commentary is unique, being the only extant extensive work by a grammarian of the Kūfan school.
The Lexicon contains about 3,000 terms and compound terms of grammar, lexicography, commentary, hadith and other Islamic sciences. Each term is presented with an English definition, often followed by an English summary. After the English section, extensive quotations from the original text are adduced in Arabic. Thus, the reader is given easy access to the contexts in which the term occurs.

Series:

Holes

Dialect, Culture, and Society in Eastern Arabia is a three-volume study of the Arabic dialects spoken in Bahrain by its older generation, and of the socio-cultural factors which produced them.
The material on which the study is based consists of hundreds of hours of transcribed conversations gathered in the mid-1970s. All major social variables are covered in the speaker sample.
Volume I, Glossary, lists all the words, with extensive contextual exemplification, which occur in the complete set of texts. Volume II will present these complete texts, and an annotated and translated selection, together with an introduction on the origins of the eastern Arabian vocabulary, and cross references to previous works on the dialects of the area and to the Classical lexica. Volume III is a detailed study of the phonology, morphology and syntax of the dialects.