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Candan Badem

The Crimean War was a defining event in both European and Ottoman history, but it has principally been studied from the Europeans’ point of view. This study analyzes the role of the Ottoman Empire in the Crimean War and the War’s impact on the Ottoman state and Ottoman society. Based on hitherto unused Ottoman and Russian sources, it offers new insights into the Crimean War’s financial, social and political implications for the Empire, emphasizing the importance of the Ottomans as both actors and victims. In addition to analyzing Ottoman and European public opinion and the diplomatic, economic and political origins of the War, The Ottoman Crimean War (1853-1856) also contains a critical review of the voluminous existing literature on the subject.


Legitimizing the Order

The Ottoman Rhetoric of State Power

Series:

Hakan T. Karateke and Maurus Reinkowski

A dynasty that ruled for more than six centuries certainly developed many strategies to confront “legitimacy crises” and undertook various endeavors to legitimize their rule.
After the introduction that establishes a theoretical framework for examining the Ottoman state’s legitimacy, the present volume deploys into three sections. “The Well-Founded Order” deals with the question of how the Ottomans imagined the order of their polity and how they tried to live up to this self-representation.
“Religiosity and Orthodoxy” turns to the question of religiosity and orthodoxy as defined by Ottoman political theory and how these concepts related to the issue of legitimacy. The last section discusses how the Ottoman notions of legitimacy were exposed to criticism, discussion or simply to transformations in situations of crisis, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Series:

Jan Schmidt

From as early as the 1600s, Dutch scholars and scholarship have displayed a keen interest in the studies of the Islamic world. Over the centuries, they have collected a wealth of source texts in various languages, Turkish texts being prominent among them.
The present catalogue is the fourth and final volume in a series that covers the Turkish manuscripts preserved in public libraries and museums in the Netherlands. The volume gives a detailed description of Turkish manuscripts in minor Dutch collections, found in libraries and museums in Amsterdam, Groningen, The Hague, Leiden, Rotterdam and Utrecht, which hitherto have received little or no attention.

Series:

Edited by Ebru Boyar and Kate Fleet

Using a wealth of primary sources and covering the entire Ottoman period, Ottoman Women in Public Space challenges the traditional view that sees Ottoman women as a largely silent element of society, restricted to the home and not seen beyond the walls of the house or the public bath. Instead, taking women in a variety of roles, as economic and political actors, prostitutes, flirts and slaves, the book argues that women were active participants in the public space, visible, present and an essential element in the everyday, public life of the empire. Ottoman Women in Public Space thus offers a vibrant and dynamic understanding of Ottoman history.

Contributors are: Edith Gülçin Ambros, Ebru Boyar, Palmira Brummett, Kate Fleet and Svetla Ianeva.

Forging Urban Solidarities

Ottoman Aleppo 1640-1700

Series:

Charles Wilkins

As with most empires of the Early Modern period (1500-1800), the Ottomans mobilized human and material resources for warmaking on a scale that was vast and unprecedented. The present volume examines the direct and indirect effects of warmaking on Aleppo, an important Ottoman administrative center and Levantine trading city, as the empire engaged in multiple conflicts, including wars with Venice (1644-69), Poland (1672-76) and the Hapsburg Empire (1663-64, 1683-99). Focusing on urban institutions such as residential quarters, military garrisons, and guilds, and using intensively the records of local law courts, the study explores how the routinization of direct imperial taxes and the assimilation of soldiers to civilian life challenged – and reshaped – the city’s social and political order.

Ahmet Şeyhun

Islamist Thinkers in the Late Ottoman Empire and Early Turkish Republic offers an overview of the lives and ideas of thirteen influential Islamist thinkers. In the aftermath of the 1908 Revolution, Islamism became a prominent political ideology. In their writings, Islamist intellectuals analyzed and sought solutions to the social, economic and political issues of the empire. Their ideas constitute the blueprint for the Islamist-oriented political movements and parties that have been present in Turkish political life since the 1950s.

This book is an important contribution to the study of late Ottoman intellectual history and the field of Islamic/Turkish political studies. It makes available in English important primary sources to scholars and students who have no access to these materials in their original languages.

Series:

Kinga Dévényi, Munif Abdul-Fattah and Katalin Fiedler

Edited by Kinga Devenyi

The Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences ‒ established in 1826 ‒ houses many small and still hidden collections. One of these, the most comprehensive Hungarian collection of Arabic manuscripts, is brought to light by the present catalogue. These codices are described for the first time in a detailed and systematic way. A substantial part of the manuscripts is either dated to or preserved from the 150 year period of Ottoman occupation in Hungary. The highlights of the collection are from the Mamluk era, and the manuscripts as a whole present a clear picture of the curriculum of Islamic education. The descriptions also give an overview of the many additional Turkish and Persian texts thereby adding to our knowledge about the history of these volumes.

Russia between East and West

Scholarly Debates on Eurasianism

Series:

Edited by Dmitry Shlapentokh

Throughout most of Russian history, two views of who the Russians are have dominated the minds of Russian intellectuals. Westerners assumed that Russia was part of the West, whilst Slavophiles saw Russia as part of a Slavic civilization. At present, it is Eurasianism that has emerged as the paradigm that has made attempts to place Russia in a broad civilizational context and it has recently become the only viable doctrine that is able to provide the very ideological justification for Russia’s existence as a multiethnic state. Eurasians assert that Russia is a civilization in its own right, a unique blend of Slavic and non-Slavic, mostly Turkic, people.
While it is one of the important ideological trends in present-day Russia, Eurasianism, with its origins among Russian emigrants in the 1920s, has a long history. Placing Eurasianism in a broad context, this book covers the origins of Eurasianism, dwells on Eurasianism’s major philosophical paradigms, and places Eurasianism in the context of the development of Polish and Turkish thought. The final part deals with the modern modification of Eurasianism. The book is of great relevance to those who are interested in Russian/European and Asian history area studies.

Series:

Edited by Marc Aymes, Benjamin Gourisse and Élise Massicard

Order and Compromise questions the historicity of government practices in Turkey from the late Ottoman Empire up to the present day. It explores how institutions at work are being framed by constant interactions with non-institutional characters from various social realms. This volume thus approaches the state-society continuum as a complex and shifting system of positions. Inasmuch as they order and ordain, state authorities leave room for compromise, something which has hitherto been little studied in concrete terms. By combining in-depth case studies with an interdisciplinary conceptual framework, this collection helps apprehend the morphology and dynamics of public action and state-society relations in Turkey.

Contributors are: Marc Aymes, Olivier Bouquet, Nicolas Camelio, Nathalie Clayer, Anouck Gabriela Corte-Real Pinto, Berna Ekal, Benoît Fliche, Muriel Girard, Benjamin Gourisse, Sümbül Kaya, Noémi Lévy Aksu, Élise Massicard, Jean-François Pérouse, Clémence Scalbert Yücel, Emmanuel Szurek and Claire Visier.

Dreizehn Jahre Istanbul (1937-1949) (2 vols)

Der deutsche Assyriologe Fritz Rudolf Kraus und sein Briefwechsel im türkischen Exil.

Edited by Jan Schmidt

The German Assyriologist Fritz Rudolf Kraus was an academic emigrant who was forced to leave Germany during the Nazi period. Kraus spent thirteen years in exile in Istanbul, where he was appointed cataloguer at the Archaeological Museum. During his exile he kept in touch with his family in Germany and with colleagues, in particular his former teacher, Benno Landsberger, who had moved to Ankara in 1935. The selection of his voluminous correspondence presented in this work is an important source for the history of both Turkey and Germany during the years 1937 to 1950.

Der deutsche Assyriologe Fritz Rudolf Kraus war ein Wissenschaftler, der Deutschland während der Nazizeit gezwungenermaßen verlassen musste. Kraus verbrachte 13 Jahre im Exil in Istanbul, wo er zum Katalogisierer im Archäologischen Museum ernannt wurde. Während seines Exils blieb er in Kontakt mit seiner Familie und den Kollegen in Deutschland, insbesondere mit seinem ehemaligen Lehrer, Benno Landsberger, der im Jahr 1935 nach Ankara emigrierte. Die in diesem Werk zusammengestellte Auswahl seiner umfangreichen Korrespondenz ist eine bedeutende Quelle für die Geschichte der Türkei und Deutschland in den Jahren 1937 bis 1950.