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Edited by Alessandro Minelli

Myriapods are the only major zoological group for which a modern encyclopedic treatment has never been produced. In particular, this was the single major gap in the largest zoological treatise of the XIX century (Grassé’s Traité de Zoologie), whose publication has recently been stopped. The two volumes of “The Myriapoda” fill that gap with an updated treatment in the English language.

Volume II deals with the Diplopoda or millipedes. As in the previous volume, the treatment is articulated in chapters dealing with external and internal morphology, physiology, reproduction, development, distribution, ecology, phylogeny and taxonomy. All currently recognized suprageneric taxa and a very large selection of the genera are considered.

All groups and features are extensively illustrated by line drawings and micrographs and living specimens of representative species of the main groups are presented in color photographs.

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Wilfried R. Arnscheid and Michael Weidlich

In Psychidae Arnscheid and Weidlich provide for the first time a complete tool for identifying the European bag worm moths. The book will provide a sufficient overview of the systematics and distribution of the European Psychidae. A total of 246 species is recognized. Description and diagnoses are accompanied by colour figures of the adults, usually depicting variation of male and female if the latter are winged. Black and white photographs of the male genitalia of most species (excluding parts of Naryciinae and Taleporiinae due to their similarity) are given for the first time. Notes on distribution and bionomics are added for every species. One new subfamily, one new genus and three new species are described.

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Edited by Isabelle Desportes and Joseph Schrével

The phylum Apicomplexa is characterized by the unique cell organisation of the zoites, the infective stages of unicellular parasites previously designated as Sporozoa. Apicomplexa includes Coccidian and Hematozoa well known for human and veterinary diseases they cause, such as malaria, toxoplasmosis, babesiosis, coccidiosis, and the large group of Gregarines, the early branching Apicomplexa. Gregarines are parasite of invertebrates and urochordates and they performed an extraordinary radiation from the marine and terrestrial hosts known from the Cambrian biodiversity explosion. After the basic publication in the Traité de Zoologie by Grassé in 1953, this second edition updates the knowledge with information provided by new technologies such as electron microscopy, biochemistry and molecular biology and to enlighten their high diversity of adaptation to invertebrate hosts living in a diversity of biotopes. The extracellular development of Gregarines, the considerable diversification of their cell cortex, their wide distribution in Annelids, Crustaceans, Echinoderms, Myriapods or Insects with about hundred thousands of species contribute to the understanding of many biological aspects of the pathogenic Apicomplexa. Since 1953, taxonomical reviews on Gregarines were published in the Illustrated Guide of Protozoa. In this supplement, there is a special emphasis on the hosts.

Contributors include: Stuart Goldstein, Ryoko Kuriyama, Gérard Prensier, Jiri Vavra, Lawrence Howard Bannister, Jean François Dubremetz.

Without the financial support of academic and non-profit organisations the edition of this volume would not have been possible. Many thanks to the LabEx BCDiv Biological and Cultural Diversities: Origins, Evolution, Interactions, Future, Groupement des Protistologues de Langue Francaise (GPLF), Société des Amis du Muséum, Société Française de Parasitologie for their generous grants.

Creature Discomfort

Fauna-criticism, Ethics and the Representation of Animals in Spanish American Fiction and Poetry

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Scott M. DeVries

In Creature Discomfort: Fauna-criticism, Ethics, and the Representation of Animals in Spanish American Fiction and Poetry, Scott M. DeVries uncovers a tradition in Spanish American literature where animal-ethical representations anticipate many of the most pressing concerns from present debates in animal studies. The author documents moments from the corpus that articulate long-standing positions such as a defense of animal rights or advocacy for liberationism, that engage in literary philosophical meditations concerning mind theory and animal sentience, and that anticipate current ideas from Critical Animal Studies including the rejection of hierarchical differentiations between the categories human and nonhuman.

Creature Discomfort innovates the notion of “fauna-criticism” as a new literary approach within animal studies; this kind of analysis emphasizes the reframing of literary history to expound animal ethical positions from literary texts, both those that have been considered canonical as well as those that have long been neglected. In this study, DeVries employs fauna-criticism to examine nonhuman sentience, animal interiority, and other ethical issues such as the livestock and pet industries, circuses, zoos, hunting, and species extinction in fictional narrative and poetry from the nineteenth century, modernista, Regional, indigenista, and contemporary periods of Spanish American literature.

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Edited by Karl A. E.. Enenkel and Paul J. Smith

This volume tries to map out the intriguing amalgam of the different, partly conflicting approaches that shaped early modern zoology. Early modern reading of the “Book of Nature” comprised, among others, the description of species in the literary tradition of antiquity, as well as empirical observations, vivisection, and modern eyewitness accounts; the “translation” of zoological species into visual art for devotion, prayer, and religious education, but also scientific and scholarly curiosity; theoretical, philosophical, and theological thinking regarding God’s creation, the Flood, and the generation of animals; new attempts with respect to nomenclature and taxonomy; the discovery of unknown species in the New World; impressive Wunderkammer collections, and the keeping of exotic animals in princely menageries. The volume demonstrates that theology and philology played a pivotal role in the complex formation of this new science.

Contributors include: Brian Ogilvie, Bernd Roling, Erik Jorink, Paul Smith, Sabine Kalff, Tamás Demeter, Amanda Herrin, Marrigje Rikken, Alexander Loose, Sophia Hendrikx, and Karl Enenkel.