Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Ethics & Moral Philosophy x
Clear All

Being Human in the Ultimate

Studies in the Thought of John M. Anderson

Series:

Edited by N. Georgopoulos and Michael Heim

For John M. Anderson philosophy, as the love of wisdom, is a concern for what is ultimate. The essays in this volume take to heart this understanding of philosophy, and are therefore responses to the ultimate. The first four essays by Kaelin, Schrag, Baillif and Johnstone, deal with Anderson's own account of ultimacy as it is presented in his reflections on the aesthetic occasion, the experience of the sublime, on freedom and on insight. The concern for what is ultimate is formulated differently by each of the other eight essays. Desmond articulates ways of our encounter with the ultimate by means of what he calls essential perplexity. Gendlin reflects on Aristotle's characterization of thinking as an activity that is ultimate. Biemel and Lingis present death as an aspect of the ultimate. Hersch sees our loss of meaning and value as the result of our refusal of finitude and thus of our denial of the ultimate which reveals itself in this finitude. Ginsberg initiates us into the ultimacy of the human encounter that is dialogue. Verene speaks of the ultimate through his account of the fool. For Kockelmans philosophy, unlike science, deals with what-is as it manifests itself in our encounter with our lived world which is a source of meaning, and in that sense an ultimate. Finally, John M. Anderson writes of the awareness of our becoming more than we are, and does so by bespeaking the origin of the dialogue we are.

Edited by Cosmin Sebastian Cercel and Cihan Ozpinar

The critical turn of the neoliberal capitalism in 2000s, 9/11 events and its after-effects, worldly and regional economic crises during the first decade of the 21st century and the repositioning of governments against crises… . The state has become one of the most burning questions of our times regarding its apparently rising power all over the world and it deserves even more attention today than any time.
The needed attention should awaken philosophical questionings as well: ‘Putting the state in its place’ cannot be considered out of ethics and oscillating discussions around the state between good and evil. This book aims to be a contribution to the debates as the volume gathers a number of contributions by scholars from around the world who discuss the state in this axis through various examples from different geographies and historical periods.

Philosophy as Frustration

Happiness Found and Feigned from Greek Antiquity to the Present

Series:

Bruce Silver

In Philosophy as Frustration: Happiness Found and Feigned from Greek Antiquity to Present Bruce Silver analyzes important views of happiness from Greek antiquity into the present. He argues that in many cases philosophers and positive psychologists do a poor job of defending the views of happiness they promote. Too often the philosophical approaches to what constitutes happiness are at odds with themselves and with possibilities for living happily. In some cases readers discover that the phrase “happy human being” is oxymoronic and that the most a person can expect is a life that is a measure of calm.

Work Values

Education, Organization, and Religious Concerns

Series:

Edited by Samuel M. Natale, Brian M. Rothschild, Joseph W. Sora and Tara M. Madden

This book is an important contribution to the Values literature on the meanings of work. These essays explore the philosophical, ethical, religious, and social foundations that underscore so much of the current thinking and concern about work satisfaction and the place of work in the search of meaning. Various points of view are presented and these include among others historical perspectives, empirical studies and cross-cultural explorations. The result is a compelling and critical volume which challenges many basic cultural and empirical assumptions and raises many questions about values and value-based decisions.

Series:

Edited by Thomas Magnell

The essays in Explorations of Value are drawn from work first presented at the 20th Conference of Value Inquiry. They are not mere records of conference presentations. The authors have reflected on their initial presentations. They have re-thought arguments in light of discussions at the conference. They have revised their work. All of this has combined to bring fresh ideas on important issues into carefully considered discussions. The nineteen authors of the essays do not share a common viewpoint on all problems of value inquiry. They are certainly not in agreement in their conclusions. Their concerns, however, cluster around a recognizable body of questions. Several of the authors raise fundamental questions on the nature of values and the possibility of giving them an objective status. Some of the authors raise questions about where value inquiry becomes value advocacy. They are also ready to ask whether or not advocacy is in the legitimate purview of philosophers. A number of authors set out to examine conditions of moral practice and of harming or benefiting people in general. Other authors show a concern for juxtaposing moral values and aesthetic values, in some cases to observe similarities, in some, differences. Finally, a few authors focus on particular notions such as forgiveness, intimacy, and love that are central to our lives.

Values, Work, Education

The Meanings of Work

Series:

Edited by Samuel M. Natale, Brian M. Rothschild, Joseph W. Sora and Tara M. Madden

This book is a collection of reflections and empirical studies which examine the many facets of the meanings of work. The authors are significant scholars in fields of study ranging from ethics to sociology. The book is a text which aims at balancing the academic with the practical and so the chapters often reflect the tensions implicit in such a venture. The reader will find in these pages historical, philosophical, educational, religious, entrepreneurial and many other points of view which combine to emerge as a text which is both encyclopedic in information yet engaging and lively in style. The reader will be able to understand how the meanings of work have changed over the centuries varying according to historical place and point of view. At the same time, the diligent reader will observe the centrality that work has in the lives of people both practically and in terms of life quests. Work has previously been defined as an activity that produces something of value for other people. This definition does not even begin to include the information about work that is presented in this book. The reader will feel a invigorating sense of worth from this book.

Barbarism Revisited

New Perspectives on an Old Concept

Series:

Edited by Maria Boletsi and Christian Moser

The figure of the barbarian has captivated the Western imagination from Greek antiquity to the present. Since the 1990s, the rhetoric of civilization versus barbarism has taken center stage in Western political rhetoric and the media. But how can the longevity and popularity of this opposition be accounted for? Why has it become such a deeply ingrained habit of thought that is still being so effectively mobilized in Western discourses?
The twenty essays in this volume revisit well-known and obscure chapters in barbarism's genealogy from new perspectives and through contemporary theoretical idioms. With studies spanning from Greek antiquity to the present, they show how barbarism has functioned as the negative outside separating a civilized interior from a barbarian exterior; as the middle term in-between savagery and civilization in evolutionary models; as a repressed aspect of the civilized psyche; as concomitant with civilization; as a term that confuses fixed notions of space and time; or as an affirmative notion in philosophy and art, signifying radical change and regeneration.
Proposing an original interdisciplinary approach to barbarism, this volume includes both overviews of the concept's travels as well as specific case studies of its workings in art, literature, philosophy, film, ethnography, design, and popular culture in various periods, geopolitical contexts, and intellectual traditions. Through this kaleidoscopic view of the concept, it recasts the history of ideas not only as a task for historians, but also literary scholars, art historians, and cultural analysts.

Series:

Edited by Mark Bevir and Andrius Gališanka

Wittgenstein and Normative Inquiry examines the relevance of Ludwig Wittgenstein's philosophy for ethics, aesthetics, political philosophy, and religion. It analyzes the intellectual contexts which shaped Wittgenstein's normative thought, traces his influences, and presents contemporary uses of his philosophy in normative fields.

The chapters focus on the nature of normative inquiry. Together, they present a Wittgensteinian approach to normative inquiry, which, while broad and contested, stands in contrast to dominant deductive approaches. Arguing to normative conclusions by showing family resemblances, drawing analogies, using persuasion, appealing to naturalist arguments, authors and Wittgensteinians discussed by them expand our notion of normative inquiry.

Sex, Love, and Friendship

Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love, 1977-1992

Series:

Edited by Alan Soble

This collection joins together sixty essays on the philosophy of love and sex. Each was presented at a meeting of The Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love held between 1977 and 1992 and later revised for this edition. Topics addressed include ethical and political issues (AIDS, abortion, homosexual rights, and pornography), conceptual matters (the nature, essence, or definition of love, friendship, sexual desire, and perversion); the study of classical and historical figures (Plato, Aristotle, Spinoza, Kant, and Kierkegaard); and issues in feminist theory (sexual objectification, the social construction of female sexuality, reproductive and marital arrangements). Authors include Jerome Shaffer, Sandra Harding, Michael Ruse, Richard Mohr, Russell Vannoy, Claudia Card, M.C. Dillon, Gene Fendt, Steven Emmanuel, T.F. Morris, Timo Airaksinen, and Sylvia Walsh. The editor, who is the author of Pornography (1986), The Structure of Love (1990), and Sexual Investigations (1996), has also contributed six pieces and an Introduction.

A Quarter Century of Value Inquiry

Presidential Addresses before the American Society for Value Inquiry

Series:

Richard T. Hull

This volume contains all of the presidential addresses given before the American Society for Value Inquiry since its first meeting in 1970. Contributions are by Richard Brandt*, Virgil Aldrich*, John W. Davis*, the late Robert S. Hartman*, James B. Wilbur*, the late William H. Werkmeister, Robert E. Carter, the late William T. Blackstone, Gene James, Eva Hauel Cadwallader, Richard T. Hull, Norman Bowie*, Stephen White*, Burton Leiser+, Abraham Edel, Sidney Axinn, Robert Ginsberg, Patricia Werhane, Lisa M. Newton, Thomas Magnell, Sander Lee, John M. Abbarno, Ruth Miller Lucier, and Tom Regan*. Autobiographical sketches* by all of the living contributors and one recently deceased, biographical statements of the remainder, together with photographic portraits of all the contributors*, make this volume a unique record of value inquiry during the past quarter century. (* indicates previously unpublished or unpublished in the present form; + indicates substantial new material has been added.) The addresses cover diverse topics, from broad, general ones, to value inquiry into literature, bioethics, and public policy; to philosophy of mind, to critical studies of other philosophers' work, defenses of philosophy and of applied ethics, individual-, role- and cultural-relativism of values. The American Society for Value Inquiry is nearing its 25th anniversary. Its leadership is elected annually, often with a vice president becoming president-elect, then president, then past president: a structure that serves to insure a measure of continuity. Its members are drawn to the society not by a particularly credo or ideology or philosophical position, but by a common interest in questions of value, ranging from abstract meta-value inquiry to disciplinary and trans-disciplinary value inquiry. For those who share this range of passions, the volume will preserve, collect, organize, and in a number of cases recover material in danger of being lost to them. The Presidential Address is a unique genre, resembling in some ways a sermon. Indeed, preparing a presidential address before a philosophical society is often an exercise in developing an exhortation to members to take up a neglected topic, to embrace as important a particular viewpoint; it may as well be a cautionary to avoid a particular error. It is often a dramatic moment: as a last act of the presidency, having observed closely the trends and winds blowing through the discipline, the speaker is afforded the opportunity to hold forth on a topic at once intensely personal and believed to be of wide interest. While some societies publish presidential addresses in newsletters or informal proceedings, and occasionally in professional bulletins or journals, rarely have a substantial bloc of a society's presidential addresses been collected and published under one cover. Too often the presidential address is delivered, discussed by those present, perhaps summarized in a paragraph in a newsletter to members, and filed as a fond memory of a moment of honor in the papers of the author - sometimes to be forgotten, lost, discarded, or otherwise removed from availability to scholars of the history of philosophy. This volume inaugurates a series aiming at preserving presidential and other major addresses before philosophical societies. It seeks to be a historical record, not only of the address but also of the reflections and recollections of the author. It seeks to preserve as a part of the historical record a photograph of the author. And, with the personal character of an autobiographical statement, it seeks to humanize and render lively and real the professional process and motivating passions that resulted in that set of remarks before that audience on that day in history.