Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Ancient Philosophy x
Clear All

Series:

Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-second year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2015-16. Paper topics include: Stoic constitution of bodies through blending as causal; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in the Phaedrus; perception in the Republic’s tripartite soul, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; Stoic identity, peculiar qualities and the role of the pneuma, and an alternative read of Plato’s politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events, the Republic as reconstruction of Socrates’ defense in the Apology and the Laws as a reconstruction of Plato’s idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.

Series:

Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-first year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2014-15. Paper topics include: the volatility of ἔρως in the Symposium as not self-directed to good or bad; the ‘analytical’ reading of the tripartite soul as autonomous sub-agents and whether it resembles neuroscience; holiness in the Euthyphro as misconstrued by the difficulty translating finite passives and passive participles in English; evil in Proclus as an indefinite nature redefined by privation, subcontrary and parypostasis, contrary to Plotinus’ identification of matter and evil; Plato’s literary reworking of the encounter of Odysseus with the Cyclops in the Sophist and of his struggle with the suitors in the Statesman.

Series:

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirtieth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2013-14. The paper topics include: pleasure in the Philebus under the rubric of the fourfold structure of reality; the tension between the good of the city and the good of the citizens in the Republic; the relation of self-knowledge to dialectic in Theaetetus and Alcibiades I; a close examination of the interplay of the characters in the Sophist to counter Plato’s replacement of Socrates by the Eleatic Stranger; and three autobiographical passages in different dialogues to establish philosophical practice as intellectual and emotional together.

Series:

Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-second year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2015-16. Paper topics include: Stoic constitution of bodies through blending as causal; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in the Phaedrus; perception in the Republic’s tripartite soul, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; Stoic identity, peculiar qualities and the role of the pneuma, and an alternative read of Plato’s politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events, the Republic as reconstruction of Socrates’ defense in the Apology and the Laws as a reconstruction of Plato’s idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.

Series:

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirty-third year of published proceedings, contains four papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2016-17. Paper topics include: a liar’s paradox in Parmenides’ Poem centered on the role of the goddess; Aristotelian logic as rooted in natural things, not mental entities, in Posterior Analytics; authorial freedom in Aristotle’s Poetics rooted in the ‘likely and necessary’; Callicles’ attack on philosophy as taking away one’s substance and Socrates’ concurrence to preserve its pursuit of truth and the good in Plato’s Gorgias. The comments do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others.

Contributors are Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore, Rose Cherubin, Shane Ewegen, Joseph M. Forte, Owen Goldin, Edward C. Halper, Jean-Marc Narbonne and Yale Weiss.

Series:

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirty-third year of published proceedings, contains four papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2016-17. Paper topics include: a liar’s paradox in Parmenides’ Poem centered on the role of the goddess; Aristotelian logic as rooted in natural things, not mental entities, in Posterior Analytics; authorial freedom in Aristotle’s Poetics rooted in the ‘likely and necessary’; Callicles’ attack on philosophy as taking away one’s substance and Socrates’ concurrence to preserve its pursuit of truth and the good in Plato’s Gorgias. The comments do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others.

Contributors are Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore, Rose Cherubin, Shane Ewegen, Joseph M. Forte, Owen Goldin, Edward C. Halper, Jean-Marc Narbonne and Yale Weiss.

Barbarism Revisited

New Perspectives on an Old Concept

Series:

Edited by Maria Boletsi and Christian Moser

The figure of the barbarian has captivated the Western imagination from Greek antiquity to the present. Since the 1990s, the rhetoric of civilization versus barbarism has taken center stage in Western political rhetoric and the media. But how can the longevity and popularity of this opposition be accounted for? Why has it become such a deeply ingrained habit of thought that is still being so effectively mobilized in Western discourses?
The twenty essays in this volume revisit well-known and obscure chapters in barbarism's genealogy from new perspectives and through contemporary theoretical idioms. With studies spanning from Greek antiquity to the present, they show how barbarism has functioned as the negative outside separating a civilized interior from a barbarian exterior; as the middle term in-between savagery and civilization in evolutionary models; as a repressed aspect of the civilized psyche; as concomitant with civilization; as a term that confuses fixed notions of space and time; or as an affirmative notion in philosophy and art, signifying radical change and regeneration.
Proposing an original interdisciplinary approach to barbarism, this volume includes both overviews of the concept's travels as well as specific case studies of its workings in art, literature, philosophy, film, ethnography, design, and popular culture in various periods, geopolitical contexts, and intellectual traditions. Through this kaleidoscopic view of the concept, it recasts the history of ideas not only as a task for historians, but also literary scholars, art historians, and cultural analysts.

Series:

Edited by Sharon Weisser and Naly Thaler

Strategies of Polemics in Greek and Roman Philosophy brings together papers written by specialists in the field of ancient philosophy on the topic of polemics. Despite the central role played by polemics in ancient philosophy, the forms and mechanisms of philosophical polemics are not usually the subject of systematic scholarly attention. The present volume seeks to shed new light on familiar texts by approaching them from this neglected angle. The contributions address questions such as: What is the role of polemic in a philosophical discourse? What were the polemical strategies developed by ancient philosophers? To what extent did polemics contribute to the shaping of important philosophical doctrines or standpoint?

Series:

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirtieth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2013-14. The paper topics include: pleasure in the Philebus under the rubric of the fourfold structure of reality; the tension between the good of the city and the good of the citizens in the Republic; the relation of self-knowledge to dialectic in Theaetetus and Alcibiades I; a close examination of the interplay of the characters in the Sophist to counter Plato’s replacement of Socrates by the Eleatic Stranger; and three autobiographical passages in different dialogues to establish philosophical practice as intellectual and emotional together.

Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition

Introduction to Reading Avicenna's Philosophical Works. Second, Revised and Enlarged Edition, Including an Inventory of Avicenna’s Authentic Works

Dimitri Gutas

Through close study of Avicenna's statements and major works, Dimitri Gutas traces Avicenna's own sense of his place in the Aristotelian tradition and the history of philosophy in Islam, and provides an introduction to reading his philosophical works by delineating the approach most consistent with Avicenna's intention and purpose in philosophy. The second edition of this foundational work, which has quickened fruitful research into the philosopher in the last quarter century, is completely revised and updated, and adds a new final chapter summarizing Avicenna's philosophical project. It is also enlarged with the addition of a new appendix which offers a critical inventory of Avicenna's authentic works, updating the work of Mahdavi (1954) with additional information on all manuscripts and important editions and translations. Its usefulness enhanced, the book provides primary orientation to Avicenna's philosophy and works and constitutes an indispensable research tool for their study.

Winner of the I. R. Iran World Award for the Book of the Year 2014