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El espectro de la herencia

la narrativa de Javier Marías

Series:

Isabel Cuñado

Desde el primer cuento hasta la última novela, la literatura de Javier Marías está marcada por lo espectral, eje fundamental en torno al cual se despliegan las grandes cuestiones del universo mariense: los efectos que el conocimiento y el desconocimiento tienen sobre la interpretación de la realidad, la relación entre lo real y su registro, las maneras en que el pasado sobrevive en el presente. Este libro, el primer estudio que enfoca la obra de Marías bajo una perspectiva sociológica e histórica, relaciona las múltiples experiencias del espectro con las tensiones entre el olvido y la memoria que caracterizan a la sociedad española contemporánea.

From his first short-story to his latest novel, Javier Marías’s narrative is haunted by the spectral, a fundamental axis around which Marías deploys the fundamental questions of his literary universe: the effects of knowledge and ignorance on the interpretation of reality, the relation between the real and its representation, and the ways in which the past survives in the present. This book-length study, the first to focus on Marías’s oeuvre with a sociological and historical perspective, brings into relation the multiple spectral experiences and the tension between oblivion and memory that characterize contemporary Spanish society.

Companion to Empire

A Genealogy of the Written Word in Spain and New Spain, c. 550–1550

Series:

David Rojinsky

This volume traces a genealogy of the varied conceptions and functions of alphabetic writing in Hispanic cultures of the pre-modern and early colonial periods. The historical junctures selected are those at which the written word (in grammatical, historical and legal discourse) assumed increased ideological importance for bolstering different kinds of ‘imperial’ power. In effect, Companion to Empire posits a constellation of historical scenarios, rather than a singular mythical origin, in which the alliance between writing and imperium might be discerned. The corpus of primary texts considered in the volume derives from works by foundational figures in the history of pre-modern language theories (Isidore of Seville, Alfonso X the Wise, Antonio de Nebrija) and from those identified with the early transatlantic expansion of alphabetic writing (Peter Martyr D’Anghiera, Bernardino de Sahagún, Nuño Beltrán de Guzmán). By reading these canonical texts against the grain, the author avoids the totalizing gesture of histories of the language, and instead focuses upon the relationship between prestige written languages, the creation of a ‘literate mentality’ and the need to consolidate imperium on both sides of the Atlantic. Companion to Empire will thus be of interest to those adopting a ‘post-philological’ approach to Hispanic Studies, as well as those interested in medieval and transatlantic imperium studies.

Post/Imperial Encounters

Anglo-Hispanic Cultural Relations

Series:

Juan E. Tazón Salces and Isabel Carrera Suárez

Spanish and English are two of the most widely spoken languages in today’s world, and are linked by a colonial presence in the Americas that has often provoked turbulent relations between Britain and Spain. Despite abundant exchanges between Spain and the British Isles, and evident contact in the Americas, cross-cultural analyses are infrequent, and ironically language barriers still prevail in a world the media and globalization would appear to render borderless: English and Hispanic Studies have seldom converged, the islands of the Caribbean continue to be separated by language, while the new empire, the United States, has difficulty in admitting to its Hispanic component, let alone recognizing that the name “America” encompasses a wider continent. Post/Imperial Encounters: Anglo-Hispanic Cultural Relations attempts to bridge this gap through articles on literature, history and culture that concentrate primarily on three periods: the colonial interventions of Britain and Spain in the Americas, the Spanish Civil War and the present world, with its global culture and new forms of colonialism.

The Last Good Land

Spain in American Literature

Series:

Eugenio Suárez-Galbán

Books studying the presence of Spain in American literature, and the possible influence of Spain and its literature on American authors, are still rare. In 1955 appeared a pioneer work in this field – Stanley T. Williams’ The Spanish Background of American Literature. But that book went no further than W.D. Howells’ Familiar Spanish Travels, published in 1913. The Last Good Land covers most of the twentieth century, including such groups as the Lost Generation and African American writers and exiles. It also considers then recent revolution in Spanish cultural and historical thought introduced by Américo Castro, which several American writers discussed in this volume may be said to have anticipated. Recent studies have expanded on Williams’ volumes, but in the majority of cases these works limit their scope to a single period (the nineteenth century, the Spanish Civil War), a movement (predominantly Romanticism) or authors known for their interest in Spain (Irving, Hemingway). The result is often a lack of continuum, or the exclusion of such authors as Saul Bellow, William Gaddis or Richard Wright. Within American literature itself, The Last Good Land contains revisions of traditional interpretations of certain writers, including Hemingway. The variety of authors treated, both in respect to ethnicity and gender, guarantees a varied and global view of Spanish culture by American writers.

Producing the Pacific

Maps and Narratives of Spanish Exploration (1567-1606)

Series:

Mercedes Maroto Camino

Producing the Pacific offers the reader an interdisciplinary reading of the maps, narratives and rituals related to the three Spanish voyages to the South Pacific that took place between 1567 and 1606. These journeys were led by Álvaro de Mendaña, Pedro Fernández de Quirós and Isabel Barreto, the first woman ever to become admiral of and command a fleet.
Mercedes Maroto Camino presents a cultural analysis of these journeys and takes issue with some established notions about the value of the past and the way it is always rewritten from the perspective of the present. She highlights the social, political and cultural environment in which maps and narratives circulate, suggesting that their significance is always subject to negotiation and transformation. The tapestry created by the interpretation of maps, narratives and rituals affords a view not only of the minds of the first men and women who traversed the Pacific but also of how they saw the ocean, its islands and their peoples. Producing the Pacific should, therefore, be of relevance to those interested in history, voyages, colonialism, cartography, anthropology and cultural studies.
The study of these cultural products contributes to an interpretive history of colonialism at the same time that it challenges the beliefs and assumptions that underscore our understanding of that history.

Series:

Edited by Anton H. Touber

Le rayonnement des troubadours, ce phénomène fascinant qui a fait de la lyrique troubadouresque l'élément générateur de la poésie amoureuse européenne, est encore loin d'être connu dans tous ses détails. Les voies de diffusion des poésies des troubadours se perdent souvent dans la nuit des temps.
Du point de vue chronologique, nous nous situons à une époque marquée par une véritable explosion démographique, par la mobilité croissante de la population et un certain renouveau spirituel. Telles sont les forces motrices des voyages incessants des élites spirituelle, politique et intellectuelle éuropéennes. La célèbre 'reine des troubadours', Aliénor d'Aquitaine, a contourné - quant aux kilomètres parcourus - plusieurs fois le globe. Elle a traversé toute l'Europe, et ses voyages l'ont menée jusqu'à Antioche lors de la seconde croisade. Pendant tous ces déplacements, la reine d'Aquitaine a pris soin de cultiver son rôle de protectrice et mécène des arts en général et de la poésie des troubadours en particulier; et, la plupart du temps, elle se faisait accompagner par ses poètes et musiciens attitrés. Parmi la noblesse voyageuse, beaucoup l'imitaient.
La poésie des troubadours s'est répandue en Catalogne, dans le nord de l'Italie et en Sicile, dans la France du nord, en Allemagne, en Autriche, en Suisse, en Galice et au Portugal. Cette influence a fait naître dans ces pays une lyrique nationale qui a été étudiée de différentes manières. Le présent livre se présente comme une tentative pour expliquer la naissance de la lyrique européenne, afin de poser les fondations des futures recherches.

Disremembering the Dictatorship

The Politics of Memory in the Spanish Transition to Democracy

Series:

Edited by Joan Ramon Resina

Most accounts of the Spanish transition to democracy have been celebratory exercises at the service of a stabilizing rather than a critical project of far-reaching reform. As one of the essays in this volume puts it, the “pact of oblivion,” which characterized the Spanish transition to democracy, curtailed any serious attempt to address the legacies of authoritarianism that the new democracy inherited from the Franco era. As a result, those legacies pervaded public discourse even in newly created organs of opinion. As another contributor argues, the Transition was based on the erasure of memory and the invention of a new political tradition. On the other hand, memory and its etiolation have been an object of reflection for a number of film directors and fiction writers, who have probed the return of the repressed under spectral conditions.
Above all, this book strives to present memory as a performative exercise of democratic agents and an open field for encounters with different, possibly divergent, and necessarily fragmented recollections. The pact of the Transition could not entirely disguise the naturalization of a society made of winners and losers, nor could it ensure the consolidation of amnesia by political agents and by the tools that create hegemony by shaping opinion. Spanish society is haunted by the specters of a past it has tried to surmount by denying it. It seems unlikely that it can rid itself of its ghosts without in the process undermining the democracy it sought to legitimate through the erasure of memories and the drowning of witnesses' voices in the cacaphony of triumphant modernization.

A Recipe for Discourse

Perspectives on Like Water for Chocolate

Series:

Edited by Eric Skipper

Slender and yet panoramic in scope, historical and yet relevant to current-day concerns, Laura Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate has provoked from the outset a divergent range of critical opinions. The essays in A Recipe for Discourse: Perspectives on Like Water for Chocolate represent the novel’s problematic nature in their many diverse approaches, perspectives that are certain to awaken in the reader new ways of approaching the text while challenging old ones. This volume’s ‘dialogue’ format, in which essays are grouped thematically, is particularly effective in presenting such a diverse range of viewpoints. The reader will find herein lively discussion on LWFC as it relates to such themes as gastronomy, superstition, mythology, folklore, the Mexican Revolution, magical realism, female identity, alteration, and matriarchy/ patriarchy. It is the editor’s hope that a diverse readership, from undergraduate students to seasoned scholars, will find this volume engaging and enlightening.

A Pepper-Pot of Cultures

Aspects of Creolization in the Caribbean

Series:

Edited by Gordon Collier and Ulrich Fleischmann

The terms ‘creole’ and ‘creolization’ have witnessed a number of significant semantic changes in the course of their history. Originating in the vocabulary associated with colonial expansion in the Americas it had been successively narrowed down to the field of black American culture or of particular linguistic phenomena. Recently ‘creole’ has expanded again to cover the broad area of cultural contact and transformation characterizing the processes of globalization initiated by the colonial migrations of past centuries.
The present volume is intended to illustrate these various stages either by historical and/or theoretical discussion of the concept or through selected case studies. The authors are established scholars from the areas of literature, linguistics and cultural studies; they all share a lively and committed interest in the Caribbean area – certainly not the only or even oldest realm in which processes of creolization have shaped human societies, but one that offers, by virtue of its history of colonialization and cross-cultural contact, its most pertinent example. The collection, beyond its theoretical interest, thus also constitutes an important survey of Caribbean studies in Europe and the Americas.
As well as searching overview essays, there are
– sociolinguistic contributions on the linguistic geography of ‘criollo’ in Spanish America, the Limonese creole speakers of Costa Rica, ‘creole’ language and identity in the Netherlands Antilles and the affinities between Papiamentu and Chinese in Curaçao
– ethnohistorical examinations of such topics as creole transgression in the Dominican/Haitian borderland, the Haitian Mandingo and African fundamentalism, creolization and identity in West-Central Jamaica, Afro-Nicaraguans and national identity, and the Creole heritage of Haiti
– studies of religion and folk culture, including voodoo and creolization in New York City, the creolization of the “Mami Wata” water spirit, and signifyin(g) processes in New World Anancy tales
– a group of essays focusing on the thought of Édouard Glissant, Maryse Condé, and the Créolité writers
and case-studies of artistic expression, including creole identities in Caribbean women’s writing, Port-au-Prince in the Haitian novel, Cynthia McLeod and Astrid Roemer and Surinamese fiction, Afro-Cuban artistic expression, and metacreolization in the fiction of Robert Antoni and Nalo Hopkinson.

Series:

Edited by Eduardo Gregori and Juan Herrero-Senés

This book offers a critical reinterpretation of the Spanish avant-garde, focusing on narrative, transculturality, and intermediality. Narrative, because it prioritizes the analysis of prose over poetry, against the traditional use of critical literature on the subject up to this point. Transculturality, because the Spanish avant-garde simply cannot be understood without the acknowledgement of its multi-linguistic reality and the transnational scope of the experience of Modernism in Europe – of which Spain was an integral yet underexposed component. And intermediality, because the interrelations of painting, photography, film, and literature articulate a correlation and mutual affect among different media, creating a rich cultural tapestry that needs to be addressed.

Contributors: Rosa Berland, Jennifer Duprey, Marcos Eymar, Regina Galasso, Eduardo Gregori, Juan Herrero-Senés, John McCulloch, Andrés Pérez-Simón, Lynn Purkey, Domingo Ródenas de Moya, Evelyn Scaramella and Antonio Sáez Delgado.