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Competence Oriented Teacher Training

Old Research Demands and New Pathways

Edited by Fritz K. Oser, Frank Achtenhagen and Ursula Renold

Internationally leading experts from four continents provide new views and pathways to teacher education and training. How can teachers be effectively and efficiently trained to master the complexity and the process conditions of teaching-learning situations? The chapters as a whole demonstrate that subtle knowledge of the conditions and variables of instructional processes is necessary. They provide new insight into the classroom. But the chapters also stress the necessity of reflection: Teachers have to learn how to judge and justify that knowledge and its use. Reflective behaviour, thus, is seem as the overall goal of teacher education and training The authors are aware that this goal might be classified as “idealistic” and present, therefore, complex examples for successful conducting instructional processes. They open the view on hidden or neglected dimensions of teaching and learning, discuss standards for teacher behaviour, present critical situations together with possible solutions and give hints for the use of technology. Together, these chapters present new perspectives for successful teacher actions and the corresponding preparation for successful instruction.

Umesh Sharma, John Roodenburg and Steve Rayner

Winner! - 2016 Exceptionality Education International Book Prize Award. This award is for excellence in publishing in the area of special education for the year 2015.
This award-winning book explores thinking about teaching and learning as an educative process. It is about creating a positive learning environment for all students and is different from most other books on such a topic. It is written by three experienced teachers who as academics, in the pursuit of evidence-based practice, have progressed research and teaching in special education, educational psychology and leadership. To breathe life into what is too often presented as dry theory, they share a narrative of their working experiences.
This narrative takes us on a journey where we will meet different characters. It aims to empower the reader by illustrating a range of research driven strategies through the voices of the characters. The reader will hear the lived experiences of students, parents, new and experienced teachers, teacher assistants and school leaders. In their stories the authors seek to share helpful understandings of realistic ways that can address everyday challenges conducive to positive relationships, environments and learning.

Erik Jan van Rossum and Rebecca Hamer

The Meaning of Learning and Knowing, co-authored by Erik Jan van Rossum and Rebecca Hamer, brings together empirical studies on epistemology, student thinking, teacher thinking, educational policy and staff development forging a solid and practical foundation for educational innovation. Since the 1980s they developed and published about a six-stage developmental model describing the qualitatively different ways students and teachers view learning and good teaching. A model with far reaching consequences for education, educational innovation and democratic society. Their comprehensive review of research from many disciplines underpins the empirical evidence of over 650 students and teachers. Each of the six worldviews results in a unique way of meaning making. These six Ways of Knowing, or Orders of Consciousness, are characterised by increasing complexity of thinking, with fourth level thinking—or self-authorship—representing the most common espoused goal of higher education. Ample evidence is presented that higher education is not attaining its own espoused goals. One explanation may be that many teachers in higher education have not themselves reached the minimum required way of knowing, preventing them from constructing a developmental path for their students. Van Rossum and Hamer’s epistemological model provides clear signposts on the developmental education highway and has proven its worth as an instrument for curriculum design, measurement of epistemological development and as a tool for staff development.

Totems and Taboos

Risk and Relevance in Research on Teachers and Teaching

Edited by Jeanne Adèle Kentel and Andrew Short

Totems and Taboos: Risk and Relevance in Research on Teachers and Teaching, is a compilation of selected papers from the 2007 Biennial conference of the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching (ISATT), held at Brock University. This volume contains keynote addresses and papers based on thematic presentations delivered at the conference; namely, critically investigative items which have been sacred to systems, institutions, and educational practitioners, in order to inform the theory and practice of teaching and research. While consideration of the native or aboriginal historical tradition of Canada was instrumental in developing a theme dealing with the nature of totems, it was recognized that such a heritage informs research and practice regardless of national borders. The papers included in this book reflect global perspectives on the conference theme and include thinkers from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Slovenia, Turkey, and the United States. In addition the writings of seasoned academics and well published authors, the totems of the field so to speak are situated alongside papers from academic newcomers who have broken the taboo of not speaking in the presence of more experienced company.

The central metaphor of this book is the high wire or tightrope journey across Niagara Falls upon which we oscillate between the falsely dichotomous notions of research and teaching. The tension in leaning towards one side or the other is presented as a negotiated process of balancing research and teaching which maintains our progress forward in the field. Overlooking this edgy relationship will cause one to lean too much in one direction and fall into the chasm underneath. Thus the sections of this book are designed to examine educational progress across this high wire while maintaining awareness of the risks taken on this journey. Each paper is relevant to particular phases in this high wire walk and portrays the journeys of the authors within in order to inform the path of others.

Examining Praxis

Assessment and Knowledge Construction in Teacher Education

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Edited by Matts Mattsson, Inge Johansson and Birgitta Sandström

Edited by Ángel Gutiérrez and Paulo Boero

"This volume is a compilation of the research produced by the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) since its creation, 30 years ago. It has been written to become an essential reference for Mathematics Education research in the coming years.
The chapters offer summaries and synthesis of the research produced by the PME Group, presented to let the readers grasp the evolution of paradigms, questions, methodologies and most relevant research results during the last 30 years. They also include extensive lists of references. Beyond this, the chapters raise the main current research questions and suggest directions for future research.
The handbook is divided into five sections devoted to the main research domains of interest to the PME Group. The first three sections summarize cognitively oriented research on learning and teaching specific content areas, transversal areas, and based on technology rich environments. The fourth section is devoted to the research on social, affective, cultural and cognitive aspects of Mathematics Education. Finally, the fifth section includes two chapters summarizing the PME research on teacher training and professional life of mathematics teachers.
The volume is the result of the effort of 30 authors and 26 reviewers. Most of them are recognized leading PME researchers with great expertise on the topic of their chapter. This handbook shall be of interest to both experienced researchers and doctoral students needing detailed synthesis of the advances and future directions of research in Mathematics Education, and also to mathematics teacher trainers who need to have a comprehensive reference as background for their courses on Mathematics Education.

Edited by Jinfa Cai, Gabriele Kaiser, Bob Perry and Ngai-Ying Wong

What is effective mathematics teaching? This book represents the first purposeful cross-cultural collection of studies to answer this question from teachers’ perspectives. It focuses particularly on how teachers view effective teaching of mathematics. Teachers’ voices are heard and celebrated throughout the studies reported in this volume. These studies are drawn from many parts of the world representing both Eastern and Western cultural traditions. The editors and authors have deliberately included the views of teachers and educators from different cultural backgrounds, taking into account that beliefs on effective mathematics teaching and its features are highly influenced by one’s own culture.
The book will provide readers and scholars with the stimulus to take the ideas presented and expand on them in ways that help improve mathematics education for children, teachers and researchers in both the East and the West.

Rina Zazkis and Peter Liljedahl

This book presents storytelling in mathematics as a medium for creating a classroom in which mathematics is appreciated, understood, and enjoyed. The authors demonstrate how students’ mathematical activity can be engaged via storytelling. Readers are introduced to many mathematical stories of different kinds, such as stories that provide a frame or a background to mathematical problems, stories that deeply intertwine with the content, and stories that explain concepts or ideas. Moreover, the authors present a framework for creating new stories, ideas for using and enriching existing stories, as well as several techniques for storytelling that make telling more interactive and more appealing to the learner. This book is of interest for those who teach mathematics, or teach teachers to teach mathematics. It may be of interest to those who like stories or like mathematics, or those who dislike either mathematics or stories, but are ready to reconsider their position.

Changing Teaching, Changing Times

Lessions from a South African Township Science Classroom

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Jonathan Clark and Cedric Linder

This is the story of a science teacher and her work in an over-crowded and under-resourced township secondary school in contemporary South Africa. While set firmly in the present, it is also a journey into the past, shedding fresh light on how the legacy of apartheid education continues to have a major influence on teaching and learning in South Africa.
The book has a compelling story line with extensively referenced notes at the end of each chapter. It is intended for a wide audience, which includes general readers, policy makers, teacher-educators, researchers and, most importantly, practitioners in the field. For, while it reminds us of the powerful constraining role that both context and students play in mediating a teacher’s practice, it also attests to the power of individual agency. As such it is a celebration of the actions of an ordinary teacher whose willingness to leave the well-worn paths of familiar practice stands as a beacon of possibility for contexts which seem, so often, to be devoid of hope.

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Debbie Horsfall and Sandra Grace

Writing Qualitative Research on Practice brings together key authors in the field of qualitative research to critique current trends and expand discourse about the challenges and practices of writing qualitative research. This book is located in the context of professional practice and the practice world. It scopes and maps the broad horizons of qualitative research on practice and explores writing in major qualitative research traditions. A key issue addressed in writing qualitative research, particularly the narrative forms, is finding a way to write that encapsulates the goals and genre of the research project. Writing is presented as a process and journey and also a way of thinking and creating knowledge. Within research, writing is an essential expression of the research frame of reference and a key element of the research genre. This book explores writing for a range of publications including books, chapters, theses and papers for journals. The practical and accessible style of this book makes it an invaluable resource for postgraduate research students, teachers and supervisors and scholars of qualitative research.