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Five Pedagogies, a Thousand Possibilities

Struggling for Hope and Transformation in Education

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Michalinos Zembylas

Five Pedagogies, A Thousand Possibilities aims at providing the groundwork for articulating sites of enriching pedagogies so that critical hope and the possibility of transformation may stay alive. The emotional experiences of unknowing, silence, passion, desire, forgiveness and reconciliation play an important political role in constituting critical resistance. The implications of these ideas are discussed in the context of contemporary concerns about social justice, conflict, hope and despair. These implications help us realize the potential of unknowing, silence, passion, desire, forgiveness and reconciliation as crucial pedagogical tasks and negotiate a hope that is truly critical. As an alternative to pedagogies that negate the ethical and political implications of teachers’ and students’ emotional lives, the present book demonstrates the need for pedagogies that enable the development of criticality without being overcome by despair. The book will be of interest to academics, researchers, educators, undergraduate and graduate students in the fields of social sciences and education and particularly in the subfields of philosophy of education, curriculum theory, teacher education, and multicultural education.

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Edited by Cees Klaassen and Nava Maslovaty

In the past two decades there has been a growing concern in politics and schools to pay more attention to norms and values. Teachers and schools are confronted with normative problems, school violence and students who sometimes seem to have lost their way when it comes to norms and values. Teachers play a crucial and exemplary role in the process of developing students’ awareness of norms and values in school and in society as a whole. This is a complex process that requires a great deal of moral courage of teachers. Confronted with an increase in the number of pedagogical duties the question arises what the teachers’ view is on their normative professionalism. The concept of teaching as a moral endeavour is a fundamental element in the series of studies presented in this book. One of the aims of this book is to be of importance for educational practice, educational policy and teacher education. It can be used in courses of pedagogy, curriculum studies and teacher education to stimulate the reflection about the practical consequences of the societal and educational policy debate about moral and democratic education for the daily work of the teacher. The common focus of this book is on the role of teachers, the moral courage which is demanded of them and the joint commitment with moral and democratic education.

Education and the Spirit of Time

Historical, Global and Critical Reflections

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Edited by Olli-Pekka Moisio and Juha Suoranta

The aim of this book is to raise current social, political, and moral issues in social theory by taking a critical stance towards historical, global, and educational themes in the context of culture, politics, and technology. All the contributors have written their texts in the spirit of critical Zeitgeist analysis, which, they believe, is a highly needed genre in social theory. Thus the focus of the book is critical Zeitgeist analysis, and its potential in addressing various social maladies of the present era. Methodologically, critical Zeitgeist analysis is argued to be of value in demonstrating how to both utilize and expand the possibilities of writing normative social theory. The key idea of critical Zeitgeist analysis is to reflect critically on the state of the present world. In this task it entwines analytical, political and moral languages, as well as the languages of critique and hope. In critical Zeitgeist analysis it is not only possible but also necessary to ask who we are, and what states of affairs prevail in our tragic times. The themes of the book are global and it can be used as a course book in several fields of social science like cultural studies, education and political science, as well as in sociology.

Leaders in Philosophy of Education

Intellectual Self-Portraits

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Edited by Leonard J. Waks

Since the 1960s we have witnessed the development of philosophy of education as a vital intellectual field. Beginning with the work of Israel Scheffler at Harvard, and spreading rapidly to the United Kingdom under the influence of R.S. Peters and Paul Hirst at the London Institute of Education, analytical philosophers of education worked toward a new understanding of such central educational concepts as teaching, learning, explanation, curriculum, aims and objectives, freedom and authority, equality and liberal education. They also examined theoretical issues in educational research and critiqued reigning ideas in educational psychology.
By the 1970s interest in the analysis of educational concepts and research methods had waned. A new generation of philosophers of education turned to new issues, including: intellectual and practical virtues, individual well-being, the education of girls and women, the ethics of care, creative thinking and imagination, multicultural education, globalization and many others.
In this book, 24 leading philosophers of education since 1970 who remain influential today present the fascinating stories of their lives and important new contributions to the field. They trace their early experiences, initial encounters with philosophy and philosophy of education, creative directions in their work, mature ideas, and perceptions of future directions for the field. Each chapter contains a list of works chosen by the authors as their personal favorites.

Edutopias

New Utopian Thinking in Education

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Edited by Michael A. Peters and John Freeman-Moir

Education has always been part of the search for the ideal society and, therefore, an important part of the utopian tradition in Western culture, politics and literature. Education has often served to define the ideal society or to provide the principal means of creating it. This unique collection of essays by well known scholars from around the world examines the role of edutopias in the utopian tradition, examining its sources and sites as a means for understanding the aims and purposes of education, for realizing its societal value, and for criticizing its present economic, technological and organizational modes. These essays will stimulate new thinking in ways that impinge on both theoretical and practical questions, as well as offering the reader a series of reminders of the ethical and political dimensions of education and its place in helping to build good and just societies. The collection is aimed at an audience of teachers and graduate students, although it will also be of interest to administrators, policy-makers and the general public interested in utopian thinking and its relation to education.

Environmental Education

Identity, Politics and Citizenship

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Edited by Edgar González-Gaudiano and Michael A. Peters

In Environmental Education: Identity, Politics and Citizenship the editors endeavor to present views of environmental educators that focus on issues of identity and subjectivity, and how 'narrated lives’ relate to questions of learning, education, politics, justice, and citizenship. What is distinctive about this collection is that it highlights the views of Latin American scholars alongside those of scholars from Spain, Canada, New Zealand, Taiwan, South Africa, Australia, and U. S. The result is a philosophically nuanced reading of the complexities of environmental education that begins to reshape the landscape in terms of ethics, ontology, epistemology, and politics. The collection bears the stamp of the location of its contributors and strongly reflects an activist, qualitative, and ethnographic orientation that emphasizes the ground for action, the identity of environmental actors, and the contribution that education in all its forms can make to sustainability and the cause of the environment. At the same time, contributors go beyond simple slogans and ideologies to question the accepted truths of this rapidly emerging field.
Cover picture: Edgar González-Gaudiano: Siem Reap, Cambodia, December 2007.

Beyond the Modern-Postmodern Struggle in Education

Toward Counter-Education and Enduring Improvisation

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Ilan Gur-Ze'ev

"This book is an attempt to historically and conceptually address the present human condition and the current specific role of education as a distinctively creative symbolic violence. In doing so, the book reevaluates the various manifestations and conflicting alternatives to normalizing education. The author suggests a unique, Diasporic, counter-education that transcends modern politics, postmodern philosophical assumptions and spiritual telos towards an impetus for the re-birth of what the author refers to as the "enduring improviser". It is a first step towards a new critical language that addresses the challenges of globalizing capitalism, of the cyberspace, of racism and of the new antisemitism that springs from postcolonialism. The book calls for a creative rearticulation of the relations between the aesthetic, the ethical, the intellectual and the bodily dimensions of the cosmos and human life. It is an invitation for a new Diasporic religiosity, one which turns courageously towards the exile of the gods. It addresses the ever-strengthening-and-tempting-sophistication of the anti-humanistic dimensions of "our" postmodern pleasure machine, of pre-modern "redemption" projects and of modern deceiving offers for "emancipation". The book is of special relevance for students of critical sociology, critical philosophy, Jewish philosophy, cultural studies, feminist studies, education—and for all friends of the free spirit.

Re-Reading Education Policies

A Handbook Studying the Policy Agenda of the 21st Century

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Edited by Maarten Simons, Mark Olssen and Michael A. Peters

This book collects studies with a ‘critical education policy orientation’, and presents itself as a handbook of matters of public concern. The term ‘critical’ does not refer to the adoption of a particular theoretical framework or methodology, but rather it refers to a very specific ethos or way of relating to the present and the belief that the future should not be the repetition of the past. This implies a concern about what is happening in our societies today and what could or should be happening in the future. As a consequence, the contributors to the book rely on a general notion of public policy that takes on board processes, practices, and discourses at a variety of levels, in diverse governmental and non-governmental contexts, and considers the relation of policy to power, to politics and to social regulation. Following the detailed introduction that aims at picturing the landscape of studies with a ‘critical education policy orientation’, the book presents re-readings of six policy challenges; globalization, knowledge society, lifelong learning, equality/democracy/social inclusion, accountability/control/efficiency and teacher professionalism. It seeks to contextualise these in relation to issues of current global concern at the start of the 21st century. Despite the diversity of approaches, this collection of critical education policy studies shares a concern with what could be called ‘the public, and its education,’ and represents a snapshot of education policy research at a particular time.

Leaders in Curriculum Studies

Intellectual Self-Portraits

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Leonard J. Waks and Edmund C. Short

In the 1950s and 1960s school teaching became a university-based profession, and scholars and policy leaders looked to the humanities and social sciences in building an appropriate knowledge base. By the mid-1960s there was talk about a “new” philosophy, history, and sociology of education. Curriculum thinkers such as Joseph Schwab, Dwayne Heubner and Paul Hirst initiated new intellectual projects to supplement applied work in curriculum.
By the 1970s the field was in the process of re-conceptualization, as a new generation of scholars provided deep critical insights into the social, political and cultural dynamics of school experience and templates for renewal of curriculum research and practice.
In this book, 18 leading curriculum scholars since 1970 who remain influential today present the fascinating stories of their lives and important new contributions to the field. They trace their early experiences in teaching and curriculum development, creative directions in their work, mature ideas and perceptions of future directions for the field. Each chapter contains a list of works chosen by the authors as their personal favorites.

Shaping the Future

Critical Essays on Teacher Education

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Edited by John Freeman-Moir and Alan Scott

World wide the production of teachers has become a sharp political issue during the early years of the twenty first century. Current systems for ensuring a supply of capable and knowledgeable teachers have come sustained under attack from politicians, economists, parents’ organisations and social critics alike. There is less agreement now about teacher education than in any time over the pass fifty years. Much of the debate in the public and political arenas has been driven by narrow and expedient consideration and too much of it demonstrates a poor grasp of the deep and complex issues which teacher education in a democracy must confront. At the same time there has been a serious educational debate which has focused on what a well trained teacher ought to be able to do, and what methods of training and education can produce competent teachers. The chapters of this book address these issues in a critical way asking what should the objectives of teacher education be. The authors demonstrate the international reach of the debate over teacher education and they ground their discussions within the national contexts of their own experience. All the authors share the view that teacher education involves much more than acquiring a set of skills and techniques. Important as these are the well trained teacher needs, for example, to have an understanding of the contexts of teaching, of the reasons why we teach, of the role of schools as institutions within political environments, as well as a coherent perspective on curriculum and the relevant bodies of theory which give overall point to what is being done. What teacher education entails will probably never be beyond contestation, at least not so long as it takes place within capitalist democracies. These democracies, with their tensions running between liberal ideals and economic imperative, push and pull teacher education in contradictory directions. At present educational ideals seems too quickly and too dogmatically to be traded for immediate fiscal policy. The authors of these chapters articulate the reasons why such short-term thinking will be detrimental to any approach to teacher education which commits itself to producing well rounded and comprehensively professional teachers.