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Len Cairns and John Stephenson

Capable Workplace Learning is about Capable people, Capable Organisations and an underlying belief in the applicability of the concept of Capability to Work, Place and Learning.
In this book, Cairns and Stephenson present a case for the development of human Capability, in life, in work, and in the lifespace. They trace the development of the Capability concept arguing that it embraces and goes beyond competence. They draw on over 35 years of experience of direct involvement in enhancing adult Capability through education at all levels.
Capability, they also argue, applies as much to organisations and working practices as it does to the individuals involved and call for synergy between organisational and personal capability. Further, the book presents a case that learning through work, whereby people utilise their work experiences and activities as the opportunity, process, place and content of what they are learning whilst they are “working” has, they suggest, established itself as a creditable way of looking at the knowledge development we all encounter and engage with whilst working.
The authors explore a range of examples of Capable practice in business and higher education and present a number of portraits of individuals whose lifework, personifies the Capability at work concept. In addition, they suggest, governments should go beyond the rather narrow aspiration of raising skills levels, to encouraging more people to experience formulating and solving the problem of their own development.

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Edited by Audrey Collin

It has long been lamented that, although several disciplines contribute to career scholarship, they work in isolation from one another, thus denying career theory, research, and practice the benefits that multidisciplinary collaboration would bring. This constitutes a lost opportunity at a time when new understandings and approaches are needed in order to respond effectively to global changes in society and work. This book takes a major step towards remedying this situation by bringing together two key perspectives on career, the vocational psychological and the organisational (interpreted broadly to include organisation behaviour and human resource management).
Written by international experts, the book opens by identifying some of the “tributaries” that flow into the “great delta of careers scholarship”, and noting the need to link what are at present separate “islands” of scholarship. It is structured to allow comparison between the ways in which the two perspectives address career development and career management theory, research and interventions. It concludes by pointing to the possibilities for dialogue, and even collaboration, between these perspectives, and suggesting ways in which these could be brought about.
The book will be essential reading for career scholars because, with its potential to stimulate new thinking and developments in theory and research and also, importantly, in practice (with beneficial spin-offs for policy-makers), this dialogue could open a new phase in career scholarship.
With its overviews of the history, theory, research and practice of both perspectives, the book will also be a valuable resource for students of both perspectives.

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Edited by Celia Popovic

In Learning from Academic Conferences, the editor combines research findings and practical advice aimed at ensuring organizers, attendees and administrators get the most from academic conferences. Contributors from the UK and Canada have pooled their experience and research findings to produce a guide in three parts. Starting with a focus on participants, moving onto presenters and finally addressing organizers, the authors provide comprehensive advice. Conferences are expensive in terms of time and resources; this book will ensure that investment is put to best effect.

Developing Practice Capability

Transforming Workplace Learning

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Edited by Narelle Patton, Joy Higgs and Megan Smith

Developing Practice Capability: Transforming Workplace Learning explores a Crucible Model for Professional Development as a means for better understanding workplace learning as a place for capability development. Professional practice is presented as a dynamic phenomenon that is embedded in practice contexts, embodied in and transformed through individual performances and ethically grounded. Workplace learning is examined in relation to development of a broad range of capabilities including qualities, judgement and potential for ethical action. The potential of the Crucible Model to enhance workplace learning is explored and narratives of professional practice capability development in action are provided. The discussions generate a range of implications and recommendations for workplace learning relevant to workplace learning educators and supervisors, academic educators, practitioners and students.

Notational Knowledge

Developmental and Historical Perspectives

Edited by Eva Teubal, Julie Dockrell and Liliana Tolchinsky

Permanent external representations in the form of drawings, maps, musical scores, figures, graphs, writing, numerals, hallmarks and signatures are part of our daily landscape and permeate most social activities almost from the moment we are born. This book is about humans’ appropriation, understanding and use of external representations.
The authors, all established researchers, present first hand research in the domain of notational knowledge. They reflect on the peculiar features and representational mechanisms of notational systems based on cultural conventions such as musical notation, graphs, writing, numerals and mathematical notation as well as on unique notations that children create in new situations. There are two chapter clusters in the book. The first cluster considers these systems from a historical perspective. Authors focus on the characteristics of these systems in different cultures and at different times and analyze the ways in which notation systems evolve and transform our social interactions, our ideas about language and about other domains of knowledge. The second cluster of chapters takes a developmental perspective. In these chapters the authors focus on the individual appropriation of these systems and highlight the interest for studying permanent external representation as a domain of human development. In particular, authors explore the ways in which notation systems are acquired, the extent to which children are sensitive to their distinguishing constraints and to the particular contents they come to represent and question the future of notations. Both the historical and the developmental perspectives are crucial for understanding the relations between culture and cognition. We can learn about the human mind through analyzing the social processes of invention and transformations of cultural artifacts and also through the individual and social process of appropriation of the cultural artifacts already created.
A common theme in the book is that permanent external representations are not just instruments for expressing given information or tools for communication, they are objects to think with. They not only keep record of existing knowledge but are themselves instrumental in the creation of new knowledge. There are conceptual, linguistic and esthetic distinctions that may be unattainable without notational means.
The book will be useful for students of psychology, philosophy, linguistics and education and for every one interested in understanding ways in which knowledge is generated, recorded and scrutinized.
Although there are other volumes on writing, literacy, and numeracy, and some chapters are available in other volumes on the history of writing, mathematics or musical notation, the present proposal is unique and timely for the range of notational systems it embraces, for including both an historical and a developmental perspective and for the number of theoretical frameworks it discusses.

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Debbie Horsfall and Sandra Grace

Writing Qualitative Research on Practice brings together key authors in the field of qualitative research to critique current trends and expand discourse about the challenges and practices of writing qualitative research. This book is located in the context of professional practice and the practice world. It scopes and maps the broad horizons of qualitative research on practice and explores writing in major qualitative research traditions. A key issue addressed in writing qualitative research, particularly the narrative forms, is finding a way to write that encapsulates the goals and genre of the research project. Writing is presented as a process and journey and also a way of thinking and creating knowledge. Within research, writing is an essential expression of the research frame of reference and a key element of the research genre. This book explores writing for a range of publications including books, chapters, theses and papers for journals. The practical and accessible style of this book makes it an invaluable resource for postgraduate research students, teachers and supervisors and scholars of qualitative research.

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Edited by Wolff-Michael Roth and Pei-Ling Hsu

Non scholae sed vitae discimus, we learn for life rather than for school. In this Roman saying, the ultimate reason for school is recognized as being a preparation for life. High school science, too, is a preparation for life, the possible careers students identify, and for defining possible future Selves. In this book, the contributors take one dataset as their object of scholarship informed by discursive psychology, Bakhtin, and poststructural positions to investigate the particulars of the language used in interviews about possible careers conducted both before and after an internship in a university science laboratory. Across this collection, some contributors focus on data driven analyses in which the authors present more macro-perspectives on the use of language in science career talk, whereas others see the data using particular lenses that provide intelligible and fruitful perspectives on what and how students and interviewer talk careers in science. Other contributors propose to transform the database into different representations that allows researchers to single out and demonstrate particular dimensions of discourse. Thus, these contributions roughly fall into three categories that are treated under the sections entitled “Discourse Analyses of Career Talk,” “Discursive Lenses and Foci,” and “Innovations in Theory, Method, and Representation of Career Talk Research.”