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Rosalind E. Hurworth

Over the past two decades there has been a plethora of book for students about how to tackle Qualitative Research (QR), but absolutely nothing on how to teach it! This book attempts to redress the imbalance by presenting a history of what is known about QR teaching, as well as to bring alive current QR teaching and learning through a set of Australian and British case studies. Courses visited were located within a variety of disciplines (including Education, Sociology, Anthropology, Nursing, Psychology, Communications and Evaluation), were taught by both experienced and inexperienced lecturers, were either presented alone or in pairs, took place in a range of institutions. lasted from seven weeks to a year and involved from 15 to over 100 students.
It emerged, however that, no matter what the context, several common issues were raised such as: Should you teach theory, practice or both? How do you determine a curriculum for a QR course? What is the best way to manage student projects? How should students of QR be assessed? In what ways can the constraints of University structures be confronted? and How can lecturer deficiencies in training and experience be overcome? To answer such questions, Professor Hurworth draws deftly from personal observations and rich conversations with both lecturers and students from all the courses described. As a result many practical ideas for moving the teaching and learning of QR forward, are suggested.

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Edited by Celia Popovic

In Learning from Academic Conferences, the editor combines research findings and practical advice aimed at ensuring organizers, attendees and administrators get the most from academic conferences. Contributors from the UK and Canada have pooled their experience and research findings to produce a guide in three parts. Starting with a focus on participants, moving onto presenters and finally addressing organizers, the authors provide comprehensive advice. Conferences are expensive in terms of time and resources; this book will ensure that investment is put to best effect.

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Debbie Horsfall and Sandra Grace

Writing Qualitative Research on Practice brings together key authors in the field of qualitative research to critique current trends and expand discourse about the challenges and practices of writing qualitative research. This book is located in the context of professional practice and the practice world. It scopes and maps the broad horizons of qualitative research on practice and explores writing in major qualitative research traditions. A key issue addressed in writing qualitative research, particularly the narrative forms, is finding a way to write that encapsulates the goals and genre of the research project. Writing is presented as a process and journey and also a way of thinking and creating knowledge. Within research, writing is an essential expression of the research frame of reference and a key element of the research genre. This book explores writing for a range of publications including books, chapters, theses and papers for journals. The practical and accessible style of this book makes it an invaluable resource for postgraduate research students, teachers and supervisors and scholars of qualitative research.

The Quest for Meaning

Narratives of Teaching, Learning and the Arts

Edited by Mary Beattie

The Quest for Meaning: Teaching, Learning and the Arts presents a narrative, arts-based approach to pedagogy and research in higher education. Through narratives of experience, the book offers revealing, poignant examples of the transformative power of the arts and of narrative inquiry in learners’ lives, and of the centrality of story in their ongoing quest for meaning.
The Quest for Meaning will be valuable in a wide range of graduate and undergraduate settings. It provides a framework for the development of new pedagogies which integrate the theory and practice of narrative, arts-based approaches to education. The work makes a contribution to the fields of narrative and arts-based inquiry and pedagogy, qualitative research methods, holistic and integrated studies, and self-directed inquiry. It will appeal to a range of audiences who are interested in this creative, integrative approach to education, and who want to gain insights into how students learn, from their own unique perspectives.
Grounded in Dr. Beattie’s interconnected approach to research and pedagogy, the book begins with her own story of teaching, learning, research and the arts. This provides the backdrop to an account of a collaborative pedagogy designed to enable students to conduct in-depth narrative inquiries into their lives, and to learn how to do narrative, arts-based research with others. The author provides insights into the practices and processes of solitary and collaborative inquiry, and the interaction and integration that take place within the three kinds of dialogue she proposes; the dialogue with the self, the dialogue with others, and the dialogue between the dialogues.
The book’s other twelve narratives show from learners’ unique perspectives, how the creation and re-creation of their ways of ways of knowing and being is a distinctively individual process involving all aspects of their humanity. Individually, these narratives provide valuable glimpses into the challenges, the joys, the frustrations and emotionality, and the important personal satisfactions involved in the processes of learning, unlearning and re-learning. In their own voices, these learners tell of the diverse ways in which they became more responsive to their own inner lives, to the perspectives and understandings of others, and to the creation of more meaningful narratives for their current and future lives.
Collectively, the narratives highlight the importance of recognizing personal experience in settings of higher education. They also present compelling evidence for acknowledging the significance of inquiry, creativity, imagination, dialogue, interaction, and integration in enabling learners to bring the whole of their being to the learning process, to the exploration of the stories by which they live, and to the creation of new narratives for their future lives.