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Edited by Michael J. Meyer

It can safely be said that when literary texts are utilized or adapted by a musician to create a new work of art, it is seldom that a diminished or lessened product results. Rather, such a merging usually enlarges and enhances both text and tune, perhaps significantly changing the message of the original. Discovering exactly what the new form has to offer and how it relates to the text or melody that preceded it is often a daunting task, requiring a close examination of both the author’s and the composer’s intent.
The essays in this collection offer an analysis of several adaptations, some successful, some not so successful, and attempt to assess just what the musicians or writers have modified or changed from to the original as they re-form it into an altogether different media. Ranging from Pasternak’s appropriation of Tchaikovsky to Britten’s operatic versions of Billy Budd and the Turn of the Screw, from Celan’s use of fugal technique in his “Todesfuge” to the way that the musicianship of several women writers found voice in their writing, a broad spectrum of collaborations is examined. As readers examine an author’s respect for a long dead musician (Hopkins’ admiration of Purcell) or as they discover how John Harbison worked to transform Fitzgerald’s musicality in The Great Gatsby, it will be evident that musical adaptations often provide a richness that the originals did not possess and that the potential for greatness is heightened when the arts intersect.

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Edited by David Francis Urrows

The twelve essays presented in this volume are drawn from the Fifth International Conference on Word and Music Studies held at Santa Barbara, CA, in 2005. The conference was organized and sponsored by The International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA) and in its central section explored the theme of “Word/Music Adaptation”. In these wide-ranging papers, a great variety of cases of intermedial transposition between music, literature, drama and film are examined. The music of Berlioz, Biber, Chopin, Carlisle Floyd, Robert Franz, Bernard Herrmann, Liszt, Richard Strauss, Verdi, and pop singer Kate Bush confronts and commingles with the writings of Emily Brontë, Goethe, Nancy Huston, George Sand, and Shakespeare in these cutting-edge adaptation studies. In addition, four films are discussed: Wuthering Heights, Fedora, Otello, and The Notebook. The articles collected will be of interest not only to music and literary scholars, but also to those engaged in the study of adaptation theory, semiotics, literary criticism, narrative theory, art history, feminism or postmodernism.

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Catriona Firth

For decades postwar Austrian literature has been measured against and moulded into a series of generic categories and grand cultural narratives, from nostalgic ‘restoration’ literature of the 1950s through the socially critical ‘anti- Heimat’ novel to recent literary reckonings with Austria’s Nazi past. Peering through the lens of film adaptation, this book rattles the generic shackles imposed by literary history and provides an entirely new critical perspective on Austrian literature. Its original methodological approach challenges the primacy of written sources in existing scholarship and uses the distortions generated by the shift in medium as a productive starting point for literary analysis. Five case studies approach canonical texts in post-war Austrian literature by Gerhard Fritsch, Franz Innerhofer, Gerhard Roth, Elfriede Jelinek, and Robert Schindel, through close readings of their cinematic adaptations, concentrating on key areas of narratological concern: plot, narrative perspective, authorship, and post-modern ontologies. Setting the texts within the historical, cultural and political discourses that define the ‘Alpine Republic’, this study investigates fundamental aspects of Austrian national identity, such as its Habsburg and National Socialist legacies.

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Edited by Kwok-bun Chan

While aspiring to escape from the drudgery and alienation which seem to be the fate of manual workers, professionals have long realized to their distress that their professionalism and work commitment by no means reduce the stressfulness of their work. Such an awareness of the impact of work on their physical and emotional well-being has led the professionals to make efforts to maximize their person-environment fit and to enhance their coping and adapation, knowing, sometimes helplessly, that society, bureaucracy, and work organization continue to be a potent source of work stress. This book offers deep analyses of work stress and coping among professionals by a multidisciplinary research team of sociologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and human resources experts. The work lives of seven groups of professionals are profiled and compared in this book: doctors, lawyers, engineers, nurses, teachers, police officers, and life insurance agents. Based on a large-scale survey, in-depth interviews, and comparative analyses, this book suggests practical recommendations and policy measures for personal, organizational as well as societal intervention. Work stress is a social problem--as such it requires a societal solution. Meanwhile, individual professionals cope and adapt in the way they know best, which is certainly not a satisfactory response.

Books in Motion

Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship

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Edited by Mireia Aragay

Books in Motion addresses the hybrid, interstitial field of film adaptation. The introductory essay integrates a retrospective survey of the development of adaptation studies with a forceful argument about their centrality to any history of culture—any discussion, that is, of the transformation and transmission of texts and meanings in and across cultures. The thirteen especially composed essays that follow, organised into four sections headed ‘Paradoxes of Fidelity’, ‘Authors, Auteurs, Adaptation’, ‘Contexts, Intertexts, Adaptation’ and ‘Beyond Adaptation’, variously illustrate that claim by problematising the notion of fidelity, highlighting the role played by adaptation in relation to changing concepts of authorship and auteurism, exploring the extent to which the intelligibility of film adaptations is dependent on contextual and intertextual factors, and making a claim for the need to transcend any narrowly-defined concept of adaptation in the study of adaptation. Discussion ranges from adaptations of established classics like A Tale of Two Cities, Frankenstein, Henry V, Le temps retrouvé, Mansfield Park, Pride and Prejudice, ‘The Dead’ or Wuthering Heights, to contemporary (popular) texts/films like Bridget Jones’s Diary, Fools, The Governess, High Fidelity, The Hours, The Orchid Thief/Adaptation, the work of Doris Dörrie, the first Harry Potter novel/film, or the adaptations made by Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and Walt Disney. This book will appeal to both a specialised readership and to those accessing the dynamic field of adaptation studies for the first time.

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Edited by Gudrun Held

The papers in this volume study the relationship between language use and the concept of the “tourist gaze” through a range of communicative practices from different cultures and languages. From a pragmatic perspective, the authors investigate how language constantly adapts to contextual constraints which affect tourism discourse as a strategic meaning-making process that turns insignificant places into desirable tourist destinations. The case studies draw on both, in situ interactions with visitors, such as guided tours and counter information, old and new mediatized genres, i.e. guide books, travelogues, print advertising as well as TV-commercials, service web-sites and apps. Despite the diversity of data, one of the common findings in the volume is that staging the sensory ‘lived’ tourist experience is the lynchpin of all communicative practices. Hence, the use of tourism language reveals itself as the mirror of how ‘people on the move’ continuously enact as ‘tourists’ and ‘places’ are constructed as must-see ‘sights’.

Edited by Edward Bander

The first complete abstracting of this trial since publication of The Pickwick Papers in 1836, this adaptation includes the origin of the case, Pickwick's dealings with his solicitor and Mrs. Bardell's firm of Dodson and Fogg, the aftermath of the trial, debtor's prison, and the denouement.

De la lettre à l'écran

Les Liaisons dangereuses

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Brigitte E. Humbert

Un panorama des différentes approches critiques sur le transfert de la page à l'écran offre ici un contexte à la comparaison entre le roman de Laclos et plusieurs de ses adaptations filmiques: Les Liaisons dangereuses 1960 (1959) de Roger Vadim, Dangerous Liaisons (1988) de Stephen Frears, Valmont (1989) de Milos Forman et Cruel Intentions (1999) de Roger Kumble. Prenant en considération le rôle de la lettre en tant qu'agent narratif, cette étude compare les techniques narratives employées dans l'original et dans les adaptations, avant d'examiner le rôle de la lettre en tant qu'agent de l'intrigue et d'analyser chacune des oeuvres.
Examinant pour la première fois les problèmes spécifiques posés à l'adaptateur par la forme épistolaire, ce livre, qui propose aussi bien une historique et un état présent de la relation entre les deux genres que de nouveaux aperçus sur cette relation, ne manquera pas d'intéresser, par ses analyses comparées des différentes oeuvres et la documentation qu'elle propose dans ses appendices, les spécialistes de littérature comme de cinéma. Elle offre aussi un précieux outil aux enseignants souhaitant apporter, par le biais de l'adaptation, une nouvelle perspective à leur enseignement de la littérature en général et du roman de Laclos en particulier.

Opera and the Novel

The Case of Henry James

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Michael Halliwell

Opera and the Novel: The Case of Henry James offers the first full-length study of the theory and practice of the adaptation of fiction into opera: the transference of a work from one medium to another – metaphrasis – is its point of departure. Starting with a survey of the current thinking regarding the nexus between words and music with specific reference to operatic adaptation of existing literary works, it traces the four-hundred-year history of opera, demonstrating that the novel has become increasingly attractive to librettists and composers as an operatic source. As the resources of modern music theatre have increased in sophistication, so too have the possibilities for an expanded engagement with complex fictional works. The intricate relationship between fictional and musical narrative is examined: the proposition that the orchestra assumes much of the function of the narrator in fiction is explored. The second section is a detailed examination of eight operatic works based on Henry James’s fiction. It is opera’s unique capability to present the intense emotional and psychological situations central to James’s fiction as well as the ability to engage with his synthesis of melodrama and psychological ambiguity which makes James’s work peculiarly amenable to operatic adaptation. Composers who have used James as a source include Douglas Moore, Benjamin Britten, Thomas Pasatieri, Donald Hollier, Thea Musgrave, Philip Hagemann and Dominick Argento. The operas discussed represent a contemporary critical and often self-conscious engagement with the art form itself as well as illustrating current adaptive strategies, and suggest ways in which new operatic paths may be forged. This volume is of relevance to students and scholars of English literature and opera as well as readers who take an interest in intermedial research and the question of adaptation in general.