The focus of this series is to gradually build a picture of the mental structure in China and East Asia. All volumes analyse the instances of affective experiences over a wide variety of Chinese or other East Asian texts from the same underlying database. The truly multi-disciplinary research method guarantees new and unexpected insights into the representation of the ‘mental-structure’ in Chinese and other East Asian societies from the angles of cultural anthropology, linguistics, psycholinguistics, literary criticism, history, and sociology. Aim of the series is, besides deepening our knowledge on the various shades of meaning in the imagery of the times, to reduce the subjectivity and cultural bias of researchers' analyses. The accompanying glossaries are invaluable reference material for any student of Chinese. This is an encyclopedic series.

The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.
The series will collect the most important theoretical statements on such topics as: readers and the reading process; intertextuality, metaphor, semiotics. The series Texto y Teoría: Teoría Literaria hopes to trace the development of theory and criticism in original essays, readers, monographs, from international scholars, raising fundamental questions about the status of the literary text and different types of discourse - be it rhetorical, semiotic and structuralist, phenomenological, subjective and psychoanalytic, sociological and historical, or hermeneutic.
A complete, up-to-date bibliography, both theoretical and applied, will make of the anthologies excellent guides for scholars and students. Each reader of the series will be a valuable text for courses in literary criticism and theory, as well as a superior reference work for scholars and students of literature, critical theory, and the philosophy of art. In an introduction, the editors will redefine each problem placing it in historical perspective, providing a sort of short history to the subject.
Since no such collections exist in Spanish, it can become an important guide to show the directions in which North American and European literary criticism have evolved.

Ediert von Thomas Mical

This new book series investigates innovative ways to think about and design our built environment. The premise of Architectural Intelligences is that theories of design can generate innovative design methods and novel design projects. Architectural Intelligences seeks synthesis, hybridity, or tensions between architectural theory with other knowledge disciplines, to produce new insights, new speculations, and new design protocols. Architectural thought and production becomes thereby active and uniquely transformative. Books in this series will unfold new forms of order, organization, innovation, and experimentation that can shape and redirect current architectural thought, in dialogue with other disciplines, as game-changers.

Prospective authors in the disciplines of architecture, interiors, and urban spaces are encouraged to submit truly trans-disciplinary proposals (for single authored, co-authored, or edited volumes). Brill welcomes scholarly works that examine the area of applied architectural theory, drawing expertise in another knowledge discipline, such as:
• Architecture + Game Theory
• Architecture + Hypermodernity
• Architecture + New Ecologies
• Architecture + New Materiality
• Architecture + New Forms of Pleasure
• Architecture + Media-Philosophy
• Architecture + New Subjectivities
• Architecture + New Networks
• Architecture + Posthumanism

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.

Cultural studies provides an analytical toolbox for both making sense of educational practice and extending the insights of educational professionals into their labors. In this context Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education provides a collection of books in the domain that specify this assertion. Crafted for an audience of teachers, teacher educators, scholars and students of cultural studies and others interested in cultural studies and pedagogy, the series documents both the possibilities of and the controversies surrounding the intersection of cultural studies and education. The editors and the authors of this series do not assume that the interaction of cultural studies and education devalues other types of knowledge and analytical forms. Rather the intersection of these knowledge disciplines offers a rejuvenating, optimistic, and positive perspective on education and educational institutions. Some might describe its contribution as democratic, emancipatory, and transformative.

The editors and authors maintain that cultural studies helps free educators from sterile, monolithic analyses that have for too long undermined efforts to think of educational practices by providing other words, new languages, and fresh metaphors. Operating in an interdisciplinary cosmos, Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education is dedicated to exploring the ways cultural studies enhances the study and practice of education. With this in mind the series focuses in a non-exclusive way on popular culture as well as other dimensions of cultural studies including social theory, social justice and positionality, cultural dimensions of technological innovation, new media and media literacy, new forms of oppression emerging in an electronic hyperreality, and postcolonial global concerns. With these concerns in mind cultural studies scholars often argue that the realm of popular culture is the most powerful educational force in contemporary culture. Indeed, in the twenty-first century this pedagogical dynamic is sweeping through the entire world. Educators, they believe, must understand these emerging realities in order to gain an important voice in the pedagogical conversation.

Without an understanding of cultural pedagogy's (education that takes place outside of formal schooling) role in the shaping of individual identity—youth identity in particular—the role educators play in the lives of their students will continue to fade. Why do so many of our students feel that life is incomprehensible and devoid of meaning? What does it mean, teachers wonder, when young people are unable to describe their moods, their affective affiliation to the society around them. Meanings provided young people by mainstream institutions often do little to help them deal with their affective complexity, their difficulty negotiating the rift between meaning and affect. School knowledge and educational expectations seem as anachronistic as a ditto machine, not that learning ways of rational thought and making sense of the world are unimportant.

But school knowledge and educational expectations often have little to offer students about making sense of the way they feel, the way their affective lives are shaped. In no way do we argue that analysis of the production of youth in an electronic mediated world demands some "touchy-feely" educational superficiality. What is needed in this context is a rigorous analysis of the interrelationship between pedagogy, popular culture, meaning making, and youth subjectivity. In an era marked by youth depression, violence, and suicide such insights become extremely important, even life saving. Pessimism about the future is the common sense of many contemporary youth with its concomitant feeling that no one can make a difference.

If affective production can be shaped to reflect these perspectives, then it can be reshaped to lay the groundwork for optimism, passionate commitment, and transformative educational and political activity. In these ways cultural studies adds a dimension to the work of education unfilled by any other sub-discipline. This is what Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education seeks to produce—literature on these issues that makes a difference. It seeks to publish studies that help those who work with young people, those individuals involved in the disciplines that study children and youth, and young people themselves improve their lives in these bizarre times.

This book series is dedicated to the radical love and actions of Paulo Freire, Jesus “Pato” Gomez, and Joe L. Kincheloe.