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Kees Versteegh

Eventually to be completed in six volumes Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.

Matatu

Journal for African Culture and Society

Edited by Gordon Collier, Geoffrey V. Davis, Aderemi Raji-Oyelade and Frank Schulze-Engler

Matatu is a journal on African literatures and societies dedicated to interdisciplinary dialogue between literary and cultural studies, historiography, the social sciences and cultural anthropology.
Matatu is animated by a lively interest in African culture and literature (including the Afro-Caribbean) that moves beyond worn-out clichés of “cultural authenticity” and “national liberation” towards critical exploration of African modernities. The East African public transport vehicle from which Matatu takes its name is both a component and a symbol of these modernities: based on “Western” (these days usually Japanese) technology, it is a vigorously African institution; it is usually regarded with some anxiety by those travelling in it, but is often enough the only means of transport available; it creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.
Matatu is firmly committed to supporting democratic change in Africa, to providing a forum for interchanges between African and European critical debates, to overcoming notions of absolute cultural, ethnic, or religious alterity, and to promoting transnational discussion on the future of African societies in a wider world.
Matatu will be published as journal as of 2016. All back volumes are still available in print.

Matatu

Journal for African Culture and Society

Matatu is a journal on African literatures and societies dedicated to interdisciplinary dialogue between literary and cultural studies, historiography, the social sciences and cultural anthropology.
Matatu is animated by a lively interest in African culture and literature (including the Afro-Caribbean) that moves beyond worn-out clichés of “cultural authenticity” and “national liberation” towards critical exploration of African modernities. The East African public transport vehicle from which Matatu takes its name is both a component and a symbol of these modernities: based on “Western” (these days usually Japanese) technology, it is a vigorously African institution; it is usually regarded with some anxiety by those travelling in it, but is often enough the only means of transport available; it creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.
Matatu is firmly committed to supporting democratic change in Africa, to providing a forum for interchanges between African and European critical debates, to overcoming notions of absolute cultural, ethnic, or religious alterity, and to promoting transnational discussion on the future of African societies in a wider world.
Matatu will be published as journal as of 2016. All back volumes are still available in print.

Edited by Longxi Zhang and Wiebke Denecke

With the increasing international importance of East Asia in economic, political, and cultural terms, more and more readers are interested in better understanding this part of the world which can boast long-standing histories and traditions as well as vibrating modern cultures. This book series publishes substantial comparative research on the literary and cultural traditions of premodern and modern East Asia and their relation to the world. It welcomes in particular forms of comparative analysis that combine the depth of area-study-expertise and philology with theoretical acumen and a courageous orientation towards fundamental questions.
The series aims to showcase original research on the methodology and practice of comparison in three main areas: intra-Asian comparisons of China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam; East-West comparisons that examine Western alongside East Asian traditions and explore their historical encounters and cultural interactions; and multi-polar studies that examine East Asian literatures and cultures in light of their relations with India, the Middle East, Africa, or Latin America. The series focuses on the core humanities such as literature, history, religion, philosophy and thought, art history, and archaeology, but also welcomes contributions adopting culturally-informed approaches in anthropology, political science, sociology, or linguistics.
The series is directed at scholars and graduate students of East Asia and, more broadly, comparatists engaged in the study of various literary and cultural traditions around the world. We publish English-language monographs, conference volumes, and, occasionally, English translations of outstanding scholarship in other languages.

The series has published an average of 2,5 volumes per year since 2014.