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Edited by Pierre Jolivet, Jorge Santiago-Blay and Michael Schmitt

There are an estimated 40,000 species of chrysomelids, or leaf beetles, worldwide. These biologically interesting and often colorful organisms, such as the tortoise beetles, have a broad range of life histories and fascinating adaptations. For example, there are chrysomelids with shortened wings (brachypterous) and elytra (brachelytrous), other species are viviparous, and yet other leaf beetles have complicated anti predator-parasitoid defenses. Some species, such as corn rootworms (several species in the genus Diabrotica) constitute major agricultural crop pests. Research on Chrysomelidae 1 is a the first of an intended series of volumes on the Chrysomelidae edited by Jolivet, Santiago-Blay, and Schmitt.

Edited by Geert Lernout

No other modernist writer in English has attracted more or broader international attention than James Joyce. Translations, adaptations, and imitations as well as works of criticism are being published in increasing numbers and frequency, and show a proliferating diversity of approaches and perspectives on the work, life, and influence of Joyce.
In view of the internationalism of Joyce studies, and the current dissemination of literary-critical pluralism, this peer-reviewed series hopes to offer a platform for specifically "European" perspectives on Joyce's works, their adaptations, annotation, and translation, studies in biography, the history of and current debates in Joyce criticism, Joyce's place in literary history, matters of influence and the transmission of ideas etc.
In calling this series "European" in the broadest sense, we aim at soliciting not only the submission of articles by European contributors, but more generally all essays and research focusing on issues of European concern such as language, nationality and culture, literary-historical movements, ideology, politics, and distribution, as well as literary-critical perspectives with European roots.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Geert Lernout

No other modernist writer in English has attracted more or broader international attention than James Joyce. Translations, adaptations, and imitations as well as works of criticism are being published in increasing numbers and frequency, and show a proliferating diversity of approaches and perspectives on the work, life, and influence of Joyce.
In view of the internationalism of Joyce studies, and the current dissemination of literary-critical pluralism, this peer-reviewed series hopes to offer a platform for specifically "European" perspectives on Joyce's works, their adaptations, annotation, and translation, studies in biography, the history of and current debates in Joyce criticism, Joyce's place in literary history, matters of influence and the transmission of ideas etc.
In calling this series "European" in the broadest sense, we aim at soliciting not only the submission of articles by European contributors, but more generally all essays and research focusing on issues of European concern such as language, nationality and culture, literary-historical movements, ideology, politics, and distribution, as well as literary-critical perspectives with European roots.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Carl Lamberg-Karlovsky, David Pilbeam and Ofer Bar-Yosef

The American School of Prehistoric Research (ASPR) Monographs in Archaeology and Paleoanthropology present a series of documents covering a variety of subjects in the archaeology of the Old World (Eurasia, Africa, Australia, and Oceania). This series encompasses a broad range of subjects—from the early prehistory to the Neolithic Revolution in the Old World, and beyond including: hunter-gatherers to complex societies; the rise of agriculture; the emergence of urban societies; human physical morphology, evolution and adaptation, as well as; various technologies such as metallurgy, pottery production, tool making, and shelter construction. Additionally, the subjects of symbolism, religion, and art will be presented within the context of archaeological studies including mortuary practices and rock art. Volumes may be authored by one investigator, a team of investigators, or may be an edited collection of shorter articles by a number of different specialists working on related topics.

Edited by Ernest Mathijs

Contemporary Cinema is a series of edited volumes and single-authored texts focusing on the latest in film culture, theory, reception and interpretation. There is a concentration on films released in the past fifteen years, and the aim is to reflect important current issues while pointing to others that to date have not been given sufficient attention.

Projected themes and volumes:
- Contemporary cinema
- Contemporary authors
- Film festivals
- Film studies today
- Intertexuality
- Postmodern filmmaking
- Practices of adaptation
- New directions in film style and aesthetics
- New developments in film technology
- Nightmare Japan: contemporary Japanese horror cinema
- The contemporary horror film
- Gender / cinema
- Art / avant-garde / experimental / underground cinema
- Animation
The Learner’s Perspective Study provides a vehicle for the work of an international community of classroom researchers. The work of this community will be reported in a series of books of which this is the second. The documentation of the practices of classrooms in other countries causes us to question and revise our assumptions about our own practice and the theories on which that practice is based. International comparative and cross-cultural research has the capacity to inform practice, shape policy and develop theory at a level commensurate with regional, national or global priorities. International comparative research offers us more than insights into the novel, interesting and adaptable practices employed in other school systems. It also offers us insights into the strange, invisible, and unquestioned routines and rituals of our own school system and our own classrooms. In addition, a cross-cultural perspective on classrooms can help us identify common values and shared assumptions, encouraging the adaptation of practices from one classroom for use in a different cultural setting. As these findings become more widely available, they will be increasingly utilised in the professional development of teachers and in the development of new theory.

Edited by Billy K.L. So and Madeleine Zelin

The economic emergence of East Asia—first Japan, followed by the Little Dragons and Southeast Asia, and the recent rise of China, has produced a paradigm shift in the study of the East Asian regions. Not only has an earlier understanding based on adaptation to Western models given way to a re-evaluation of the interface between the local and the global, but scholarship itself has become increasingly transnational. This is evidenced in hitherto unseen levels of transnational collaboration, conferences and research programs, and the creation of on-line archives and virtual intellectual communities. East Asia, broadly defined to include both northeast and southeast Asia, has contributed greatly to this shift. This series aims at providing a platform for the products of this scholarship, encouraging interdisciplinary, transnational and comparative research on the countries and peoples of the East Asian region, and their regional and global interactions. In an effort to reflect the full range of collaborations that are now taking place across the globe this series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works that explore the global processes of change in East Asia and the historical role of East Asia in the creation of the institutions, ideas, and practices that constitute our contemporary world.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
From the origins of Christianity sermons have been the primary vehicles for combating popular beliefs and practices, for educating the laity in the basics of Christian doctrine and for motivating them to self-improvement. As time went on the education, inspiration, and indoctrination of preachers became a primary concern of Christian reforming movements, governments and the church. Hitherto sermons have largely been studied for the information which they contain on theological or exegetical method. Yet preaching in the history of the Church was an interactive process, shaped not only by the wishes of civil and ecclesiastical powers but also, more importantly, by the expectations and demands of parishioners themselves -- which they often freely expressed.
The volumes of essays in this series examine this social dialectic of preaching - both orthodox and heterodox - in early Christianity and the Byzantine world, in Medieval and Early Modern Europe and in the period of the rapid expansion of Christianity beyond Europe in the 16th to 18th centuries. Themes discussed include the world views and pastoral concerns of preachers and their audiences, the composition of such audiences, the circumstances of preaching, the subject-matter of sermons, the different genres of sermons, their preparation and transmission, the dynamic we can discern between a preacher and his congregation, the use of tropes from other literary genres, how oral and written cultures meet in sermons, and the adaptations made to style and presentation in differing political communities and social landscapes.
It is hoped that the series will fill many of the lacuna which exist in the critical/analytical study of sermons and throw light on a range of unexplored areas in the history Christian experience.

Editor-in-Chief Volkhard Krech

The so-called world religions and other religious traditions are not, and have never been, homogenous, nor have they formed or evolve in isolation. Trying to overcome cultural stereotypes and their ideological misuse, the series "Dynamics in the History of Religions" focuses on the crucial role of mutual encounters in the origins, development, and internal differentiation of the major religious traditions. The primary thesis of the series consists in the assumption that interconnections of self-perception and perception by the other, of adaptation and demarcation are crucial factors for historical dynamics within the religious field.

The series includes exemplary and comparative studies on the formation of the major religious traditions via diachronic and synchronic cultural contact, on interactions essential to the process of institutionalization and spread of religions, on interreligious encounters under the condition of colonialism and globalization, and on the stimulus provided by such contacts to the development of basic religious notions.

Presenting studies on such contact-driven dynamics of the history of religions and of its reflection, both case studies and studies using a comparative perspective, the series creates systematic points of references which allow for the integration of diachronically and synchronically heterogenous material in a general history of religions. Theories and concepts are developed abductively in an interplay of hypothetical conceptualization and empirical studies, of object language and meta language. By bridging and reconciling scientific meta-discourse on religion with religious discourses and religious self-descriptions, both unempirical scientism and un-theoretical positivism can be avoided.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Leo Tak-hung Chan, Gabriela Saldanha, Şebnem Susam-Sarajeva, Tom Toremans and Michaela Wolf

Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.