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Edited by Hubert van den Berg, Axel Goodbody and Marcel Wissenburg

The series Nature, Culture and Literature is dedicated to publications approaching literature and other forms of text-based communication from an ecological standpoint. It provides a platform for the practice of ecocriticism in the broadest sense, understood as an issue-driven field of cultural enquiry comprising critical textual analysis and theorising on human/nature relations.
The series publishes single-author monographs and thematically focused collections of essays, on literature across languages, cultures and periods, and on other forms of writing. It is open to scholars working in green media studies, environmental history, philosophy, social and cultural theory, and linguistics, as well as national literatures and comparative literature.
Nature, Culture and Literature embraces a range of different approaches, and explores phenomena observable in Europe, America and beyond in their international extension as well as in their national and regional peculiarities.
Individual volumes focus on a specific area of research. They may examine the work of a single author or the characteristics of the environmental imagination in a particular culture; they may map one of the themes central to popular understandings of nature and explore their creative reconfiguration (e.g. nature and national/regional identity, human/ animal relations, or climate change); or they may develop and illustrate a particular theoretical approach (for instance in ecolinguistics, energy humanities, or econarratology / ecopoetics).

The series aims to publish an average two volumes per year. All volumes are peer reviewed.

Edited by Loukas Mitselis and Nikos Lavranos

Call for submissions
- Young Practitioners and Scholars Essay Competition 2020.
- Papers for the 2020 issue with a focus on the theme “The changing face of European investment law and arbitration” .

With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while others fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is the first law periodical specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’. The timing could not be better. The first EU integrated investment treaties with Canada (CETA), US (TTIP) and Singapore (EU-SING) are either negotiated or about to be signed and ratified by the EU and its Member States. These are “integrated” investment treaties in that they combine free trade agreement provisions with international investment agreement norms. Moreover, the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) is about to deliver its first judgments and Opinions directly relating to intra-EU BITs and the EU-SING FTA. More generally, the public debate and discussions within academic and practitioner circles about the pros and cons of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) and investment treaties in general is intensifying almost on a daily basis.
The Review will cover all these issues, but also goes beyond that by offering space for more innovative approaches and themes.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.

Edited by Adam Lucas and Steven A. Walton

The role played by technology in transforming human societies has been a preoccupation of the modern period. Technology and Change in History is a peer-reviewed* series of monographs which surveys the development of technology from a variety of different historical perspectives. Each volume aims to present to scholars, graduate students and non-specialists alike the current state of knowledge in the field. Earlier volumes in the series have focused on the Ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman World, as well as the medieval and early modern periods. Over the coming years, the time period and geographical coverage of the series will be extended to encompass the prehistoric and modern periods, as well as Asia, Africa, the Americas and Oceania.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors: Adam Lucas (University of Wollongong) or Steven A. Walton (Michigan Technological University).

*For the Brill Author Guide which also includes information on Brill's peer review process click here.

Edited by Giulio Bartolini, Dug Cubie, Marlies Hesselman and Jacqueline Peel

The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives.

Volume One features a thematic section on the Draft Articles of the ILC on the “Protection of Persons in the Event of Disasters” as well as a general selection of articles, and an international and regional review of International Disaster Law in Practice, plus book reviews and bibliography.

The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.