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Edited by Katie Barclay, Andrew Lynch and Giovanni Tarantino

EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. The journal aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualized and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

EHCS is interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. The journal also invites papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts, and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Finally, Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

Following an initial review process by the editors, EHCS sends acceptable submissions to two expert independent readers outside the author’s home institution, employing a double-blind review procedure.

EHCS is published on behalf of the Society for the History of Emotions.

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Frans B.M. de Waal

Behaviour is interested in all aspects of animal (including human) behaviour, from ecology and physiology to learning, cognition, and neuroscience. Evolutionary approaches, which concern themselves with the advantages of behaviour or capacities for the organism and its reproduction, receive much attention both at a theoretical level and as it relates to specific behaviour.

The journal Behaviour has its roots in ethology and behavioural biology (see historical note), in which the emphasis is not so much on how animals compare with humans under strictly controlled conditions (as in comparative psychology), but more on tracing the phylogeny and evolution of natural behaviour as shown under naturalistic or natural conditions. Specialized cognition and communication are part of this approach. Well-controlled laboratory experiments are needed and welcome, but by no means the only approach. Behaviour has a long tradition of publishing systematic observations of spontaneous behaviour.

Behaviour covers the whole animal kingdom, from invertebrates to fish, and from frogs to primates. The study of animal behaviour remains vibrant and keeps attracting young, talented scientists, who will find Behaviour a journal with a quick turn-around time (we strive for first reviews within a month) read by a wide range of students and researchers of animal behaviour.

Historical note: Behaviour was founded by Nobel Prize winner Niko Tinbergen together with W. H. Thorpe, in 1948. In a classical 1963 paper—dedicated to the 60th birthday of that other animal behaviour Nobelist, Konrad Lorenz—Tinbergen proposed that questions relating to why an animal behaves in a particular way can be viewed through four prisms. At the proximate level, we have 1) the causation of behaviour (its underlying motivation, cognition, and emotions), and 2) the behaviour's ontogeny, such as how it develops or is acquired. At the ultimate level, we have 3) the behavior's survival value, and 4) its evolution and phylogeny. Behaviour seeks to cover all four prisms equally.

2018 Impact Factor: 1.401
5 Year Impact Factor: 1.4

The editorial board of Behaviour wishes to state unequivocally that it is not our policy to influence the Impact Factor in any way that could be regarded unethical.

Online submission: Articles for publication in Behaviour can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here. As of July 1st 2017, full colour images and figures are published free of charge.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

Alternatively, you may submit your manuscript through Behaviour’s site at the Peerage of Science community. Peerage of Science features Open Engagement, allowing any qualified, non-affiliated scientist to engage to peer-review your work. The end result includes revision recommendations, and standardized quantitative evaluation of the revised version, in addition to the reviews. Peerage of Science is free of any charges. Click here to submit your work to the journal, using Peerage of Science.

Finn Collin

The Danish Yearbook of Philosophy is a peer-reviewed journal published annually for the Danish Philosophical Association. Reflecting the broad interpretation of philosophy institutionalized at Danish Universities, the Yearbook aims to cover a broad ground in relation to philosophical schools, styles and traditions. The journal publishes in English, German and French.

The Danish Yearbook of Philosophy was founded in 1964 to stimulate the professional interaction between Danish philosophers and their international colleagues. The journal now has a broad focus and welcomes all submissions of general philosophical interest. Still it has as its particular mission the publication of articles of a high international standard relating to Danish academic philosophy in the following senses:

1.) The theme or subject of the contribution is a Danish philosopher or a school of philosophy that has, or has had, a significant representation in Denmark. 2.) The activity behind the contribution is linked to Denmark, typically in the form of a presentation originally delivered in Denmark, e.g. as a keynote address, an invited guest lecture, a contribution to a seminar etc. 3.) The author of the contribution is a Danish philosopher, a philosopher based in Denmark, or connected to Denmark in some other way.

The Yearbook may dedicate a section or a whole issue to a specific theme. Prospective guest editors are encouraged to write to the Editor-in-Chief.

The Yearbook also has as its special mission to review books published in English, German or French by Danish philosophers, or philosophers with strong ties to Denmark. Reviewers must be non-Danish philosophers.