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Paragone: Past and Present

A Journal on Rivalry in the Arts

Sarah Lippert

THE RELEASE OF THE FIRST ISSUE OF THIS JOURNAL IS DELAYED TILL 2021 DUE TO THE UNEXPECTED AND TRAGIC DEATH OF THE SERIES EDITOR, SARAH LIPPERT.

Paragone: Past and Present is dedicated to featuring scholarship on the history of competition between the arts from antiquity into the present. Rivalry is interpreted in the broadest terms from all global contexts. For instance, scholars consider rivalries between individual artists, patrons of the arts, nationalistic competition, aesthetic theory, arts-related organisations, debates over the superiority of one art versus another, ut pictura poesis and word/image studies, etc. Examples of relevant artistic media include graphic design, animation, painting, sculpture, performance, conceptual art, music, literature, theatre, dance, film, and others. Many scholarly disciplines in the humanities will represent the study of these media, such as literary history, philosophy, critical theory, visual communications, art history, and musicology.

Journal of the Society for Paragone Studies.
Brill Research Perspectives in Classical Poetry (RPCP) is a peer-reviewed journal presenting review articles with commentary on the current state of the field of Classical Poetry. Articles provide synthetic reviews of Classical Poetry that reflect the latest research in the field. They cover periods, genres and authors from Homer through Late Antiquity. Authors combine historical, formal, and theoretical analysis, and they present extensive bibliographies of relevant scholarship. In containing both broad overviews of subject areas and detailed advanced criticism, articles are designed to be useful to scholars, teachers, and students alike.

Studi Magrebini

North African Studies

Studi Magrebini. North African Studies is a peer-reviewed international scholarly journal, which has been published since 1966. The areas of interest of the magazine range from history, religion, law, and literatures to epigraphy, philosophy, philology, art, archaeology, and economics. It welcomes synchronic and diachronic perspectives, beginning from the historical origin of North Africa to the present day.
Brill Research Perspectives in Ancient History (RPAH) is a peer-reviewed journal presenting review articles with commentary on the current state of the field of Ancient History. Articles draw on the latest interdisciplinary research in historical, cultural, political, social, and theoretical analysis to provide useful, up-to-date review and commentary for scholars, teachers, and students. Focused on Ancient History, the RPAH has a broad scope in geographic and chronological terms encompassing the Greco-Roman world, including the Mediterranean basin and Europe, from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity.

Demanding the highest standard for submissions of its articles, RPAH provides cutting-edge scholarly surveys of each topic presented and international scholars from diverse fields will contribute solicited articles long enough to provide comprehensive treatment on an array of topics within their expertise. Published in print and on-line, issues will be updated periodically by authors to revitalize their commentary and analysis and to ensure currency of citations.
Published since 1971, the African Review hosts intellectual debates and discussions on African politics, development and international affairs. It welcomes theoretical and empirical submissions which are provocative in analyzing the social, economic and political forces that shape the present and future of the continent. Being an interdisciplinary journal, theAfrican Review covers a wide range of fields such as political science, international relations, strategic studies, law, public administration, sociology, gender studies, history, economics, political geography, demography, and development studies. The African Review has for many years established itself as a peer reviewed academic journal of repute in Africa and beyond.;
This is a multidisciplinary journal dedicated to conceptualizations of criticality in media literacy. The focus is on articles that engage with media in ways that disrupt the normative discourses perpetuated through market logics and dominate institutions, promote ways of thinking critically about and with digital media culture, and present opportunities for analyzing and interpreting the codes, conventions, and ideologies implicit in our media saturated lives. It also centers on the ways in which critical media literacy is absent in today’s standardized educational curriculum. JCML has two issues per volume. It is a peer refereed journal and is available as hard copy and online. The hard copy issues can include artwork, and photographs. The on-line version can include artwork, photographs, audio and videos. Manuscripts can cover but are not limited to such topics as: the history of the field of critical media literacy, the state of critical media literacy studies and the urgency of critical media literacy knowledge at the present historical moment, critical media literacy in classrooms, etc.

For questions and/or submissions please contact the Editors, Bill Reynolds and/or Brad Porfilio.

Editor-in-Chief Harm Kaal and Jelle van Lottum

The Journal of Applied History (JOAH) is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed scholarly journal concerned with the application of historical knowledge and insights to current matters. As such it seeks to promote long-term thinking when considering the causes and implications of present affairs and issues.

The use of the concept of ‘applied history’ enables us to move away from the rather broad and diverse field of 'public history'. JOAH promotes interventions in contemporary policy making as well as in contemporary discussions about key social issues that are based on thorough historical research. We therefore do not aim at a broad and often ill-defined audience beyond academia, but on a rather well-defined public of professional (academic) historians, policy makers, civil servants and other professionals in think tanks, government agencies and (semi-)public authorities.

JOAH encourages contributions from specialists in all branches of the humanities and social sciences who adopt a historical approach: from historians and anthropologists, to political scientists and sociologists, and from experts in the history of antiquity to those working on the very recent past, thus bringing together long-term perspectives and various approaches and methodologies. The journal seeks to inform scholars and policy makers interested in connecting past and present through publishing relatively short articles of approximately 4,000 words.

Bridging Humanities

Platform for Alternatives Methodologies

Edited by Mirjam de Bruijn

Bridging Humanities – Platform for Alternatives Methodologies is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary and multi-area online publication. The scope of Bridging Humanities is to publish original projects that include visuals and other kinds of digital sources as an integral part of the publication. Bridging Humanities includes original research from the humanities intended as an open field that is connected with other disciplines. Each publication is an interactive online space in which text and visuals are used as sources to produce and present knowledge from their field. Using this new format, Bridging Humanities encourages researchers to experiment with new methodologies for publication in which the importance of the digital is recognized as an integral part of the publication and research process. The website publishes at least one new project per year and is hosted externally: www.bridginghumanities.com

Edited by Katie Barclay, Andrew Lynch and Giovanni Tarantino

EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. The journal aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualized and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

EHCS is interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. The journal also invites papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts, and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Finally, Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

Following an initial review process by the editors, EHCS sends acceptable submissions to two expert independent readers outside the author’s home institution, employing a double-blind review procedure.

EHCS is published on behalf of the Society for the History of Emotions.
The Journal of Religion in Africa, founded in 1967 by Andrew Walls, is interested in all religious traditions and all their forms, in every part of Africa, and it is open to every methodology. Its contributors include scholars working in history, anthropology, sociology, political science, missiology, literature and related disciplines. It occasionally publishes religious texts in their original African language.

Presenting a unique forum for the debate of theoretical issues in the analysis of African religion past and present, the Journal of Religion in Africa also encourages the development of new methodologies. It reviews a very wide range of books and regularly publishes longer review articles on works of special interest. It prides itself on being highly international and is the only English-language journal dedicated to the study of religion and ritual throughout Africa. In an effort to highlight emerging themes in the study of religion in Africa, and promote the outstanding work of younger scholars, it regularly publishes special issues on current topics.

European Science Foundation Ranking A.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the Journal of Religion in Africa can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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