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Editor-in-Chief Stephen W. Angell and Pink Dandelion

This wide-ranging and fascinating series supplements a growing catalogue of historical, sociological, and theological scholarship in the thriving and interdisciplinary field of Quaker Studies. Individual articles will speak to the broad spectrum of Quaker belief and practice, to the significance of the history of Quaker traditions, and to the many areas in which Quaker Studies contributes to other fields in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Work on Quakerism impacts both wider church history and theological debate, as well as current themes in the sociology of religion. The Quaker attitude to spiritual equality also engages women’s studies scholars, and the Quaker commitment to peace and social justice relates to wider issues of political theory and peace studies. As the field of Quaker Studies continues to grow and redefine itself, this series will make a significant contribution to making up-to-date scholarship accessible to specialists as well as to a broad academic community.
Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, Ecology is an international academic journal that studies the relationships between religion, culture, and ecology worldwide. The journal addresses how cultural and ecological developments influence the world's major religions, giving rise to new forms of religious expression, and how in turn religious belief and cultural background can influence peoples' attitudes toward ecology.

To receive a free sample copy of Worldviews, please send an email to marketing@brill.com

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, Ecology can be submitted online through Editorial Manager. Please click here.

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Religion & Human Rights

An International Journal

Religion & Human Rights provides a unique academic forum for the discussion of issues which are of crucial importance and which have global reach. The Journal covers the interactions, conflicts and reconciliations between religions or beliefs on the one hand; and systems for the promotion and protection of human rights, international, regional and national, on the other.

The Journal tackles these issues fearlessly, and draws its materials from all relevant disciplines - theology, anthropology, history, international relations, human rights, religious studies, and many others - but with special emphasis on legal frameworks. It is an indispensable source for all those concerned with monitoring, studying, teaching, analysing or developing policies on the relationship between religion and human rights today.

Religion & Human Rights is a peer-reviewed, academic journal, published by Brill | Nijhoff - the world’s leading imprint for international Human Rights books and periodicals. Brill | Nijhoff is an imprint of Brill in Leiden, The Netherlands, which is itself internationally renowned for the strength of its publishing programmes, inter alia, in the field of religious studies.

Online submission: Articles for publication in Religion & Human Rights can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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Edited by Christof Heyns

Contrary to popular belief, there is a vast body of law dealing with human rights in Africa in existence today. The first priority at the moment is consequently not the adoption of new norms, or the creation of even more structures, the most immediate challenge lies in making the existing structures work and ensuring compliance with the norms already accepted by African societies. Access to the relevant material constitutes a necessary precondition for any other gains in this field. The aim of this reference work is, therefore, to make African human rights law accessible to all those involved in or interested in human rights law on the continent, in order to strengthen its impact. Primary documents are introduced and reproduced and presented in a coherent framework. The main institutions - public and private - dealing with human rights in Africa are identified and discussed. Comprehensive overviews of the international human rights legal regimes applicable to Africa, as well as country reports are provided. Access to this body of law will enable judges, practicing lawyers, academics and other researchers, as well as law reformers, NGOs, activists and students, to both ascertain and assert these rights. It will also serve to ensure the development of a stronger indigenous African human rights jurisprudence, rooted in local experience, history, culture and practices. This book consequently tries to contribute towards documenting, systemising and anchoring the African human rights system. This publication replaces and updates the earlier Human Rights Law in Africa Series, which appeared on an annual basis from 1996 to 1999. In order to make the publication accessible in Africa, the Centre for Human Rights and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute in Sweden have undertaken a targeted distribution campaign on the continent.
Review of Religion and Chinese Society is an international peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles and book reviews in social sciences and certain humanities disciplines. All articles will be in English, and Chinese titles and abstracts will be provided as well.
• “Religion” is understood in the broadest sense, including various spiritualities and meaning-making systems of beliefs and practices.
• “Chinese society” includes those in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, and Chinese diasporic communities in Asia, North America, Europe, and elsewhere throughout the world.
• It welcomes studies that compare religion in Chinese and some other societies.
• The journal is multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary in its outlook and presents theoretical and empirical studies of religion in disciplines such as anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, sociology, and history.
• The preferred articles are theoretically driven empirical studies, although it also publishes articles that are primarily empirical or primarily theoretical.
• It also publishes review essays of particular fields, symposia of particular topics, interviews with renowned scholars, and reports of academic conferences relevant to the themes of this journal.
• Submissions of articles and proposals for special issues are welcome.
• The journal will publish reviews of books that have been published in English, Chinese, and other languages.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the Review of Religion and Chinese Society can be submitted online through Editorial Manager. Please click here.

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Diplomatica

A Journal of Diplomacy and Society

Editor-in-Chief Giles Scott-Smith and Kenneth Weisbrode

Individuals are eligible for free access to Diplomatica until 31 December 2020, using access token DIPL4U. Click here for more information.

Diplomatica: A Journal of Diplomacy and Society addresses the broad range of work being done across the social sciences and the humanities that takes diplomacy as its focus of investigation. The journal explores and investigates diplomacy as an extension of social interests, forces, and environments. It is multidisciplinary, providing a space to unite perspectives from diplomatic history (humanities) and diplomatic studies (social sciences) in particular. It is interdisciplinary, expanding beyond its disciplinary foundation of history to enrich historical perspectives with innovative analyses from other disciplines. It seeks to broaden the study of diplomacy temporally, contributing to a re-appraisal of diplomacy across the modern and early modern eras and beyond, in this way bridging temporal divides and introducing debate between scholars of different periodizations. It is determinedly global in orientation, providing a space for inter-regional comparisons. The journal is published in cooperation with the New Diplomatic History (NDH) Network.

Diplomatica seeks to merge diplomatic history and diplomatic studies through three main approaches:
1. Habitat: Exploring the multiple identities, behaviors, rituals, and belief systems of diplomats and how they change according to time, place, and space;
2. Actors: Challenging the centrality of the nation-state as the principal actor framing an understanding of what diplomacy is by focusing equally on the role of non-state actors;
3. Disciplines: Introducing appropriate methodologies from the social sciences, such as prosopography, network analysis, gender studies, economics, geography, and communications, in order to broaden the analytical study of diplomatic habitats, actors, and interactions through time.

Broadly speaking, Diplomatica covers the study of diplomatic process more than the study of diplomatic product. It questions, investigates, and explores all aspects of the diplomatic world, from interactions between the professionally diplomatic and the non-diplomatic to the arrangement of summits and banquets, the architecture of ministries and residences, and the identities, roles, practices, and networks of envoys, policy entrepreneurs, salonnières, and all other private and quasi-private individuals who affect the course of diplomacy.

The journal welcomes submissions dealing with any period and locale from across the humanities and social sciences. Submissions should be standard article length (approximately 8,000 words including footnotes) and written for a general, scholarly audience.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Diplomatica Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Haakon Ikonomou.

The Mattingly Award
Brill, the editorial board of Diplomatica, and the New Diplomatic History Network are pleased to provide an annual award of €500 for excellence and originality in an essay on diplomatic society or culture, broadly defined. The Mattingly Award is named for the American historian, Garrett Mattingly (1900-62), an esteemed writer, scholar, and professor at Columbia University. Best known for his history of the Spanish Armada (1959), which won the Pulitzer Prize, and his biography of Catherine of Aragon (1941), Mattingly pioneered the study of diplomatic institutions, practices, norms, and personalities, notably in his classic history of early modern Europe, Renaissance Diplomacy (1955).

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Diplomatica can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Tim Hutchings

Individuals are eligible for free access to the Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture until 31 December 2019, using access token RMDC4U. Click here for more information.

The Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture (RMDC) is a peer-reviewed academic journal, publishing three issues per year. RMDC is published in cooperation with the International Society for Media, Religion and Culture (ISMRC).

To understand religion today, we must understand how religious ideas and practices are communicated, learned, represented, enacted and resisted through media. Religion circulates through social media, is discussed in the news and becomes a source of imagery for film and television. Popular understandings of religious belief and practice are formed by encounters with their representations in journalism and entertainment media. Religious institutions produce their own media, too, from radio and TV preachers to religious videogames. This journal seeks to provide a venue for sharing new empirical research and theoretical analysis of these and other intersections between religion, media and culture.

RMDC publishes original work that contributes to social-scientific discussion of the relationship between religion, media and culture. Studies of any religious tradition, medium or geographical region are welcome. The journal’s primary focus is on recent and contemporary media, but historical studies may also be considered. Theological writings will not normally be accepted for publication.

ISMRC is a worldwide association for the academic study of religion and media. Its meetings began in 1994, and a biennial series of International Conferences on Media, Religion and Culture has been organized since 1996. These conferences have now been held in North and South America, Europe and Asia, and affiliated conferences have also been arranged in many countries. RMDC received the official endorsement of this society in 2017 and seeks to continue this global scholarly conversation.

RMDC publishes peer-reviewed articles (6-8000 words), non-reviewed research reports (up to 5000 words), book reviews (up to 1200 words) and review articles (2-3000 words, comparing two or more recent books on a common theme). Submissions should conform to the Instructions for Authors, available below as a downloadable PDF.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the editor-in-chief, Tim Hutchings.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Ruth Tsuria.

Online submission: Articles for publication in the Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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Secular Studies publishes original research on secularity, both historical and contemporary, and secular issues and agendas from multi-disciplinary and international perspectives. Historical, literary, cultural, political, anthropological, sociological, psychological, and philosophical studies of secular thought and living are sought, along with research on nonreligion, atheism, agnosticism, humanism, and naturalism. Also welcome are comparative, intersectional, and cross-cultural studies of secularity and secular people, investigations into types of secularism and patterns to secularization, and explorations of church-state relations around the world. Suitable submissions will receive double-blind peer review. All articles are published in English.

Medieval Encounters

Jewish, Christian and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue

Editor-in-Chief Ryan Szpiech

Celebrating 25 Years of Medieval Encounters
To celebrate the 25th volume of Medieval Encounters, selected articles from the past 25 volumes will be available for free downloading during 2019. See the free articles here.

In addition, a reflection piece on Medieval Encounters, written by Editor-in-Chief Professor Ryan Szpiech (University of Michigan) to celebrate the journal’s 25th anniversary, is available throughout the year.

Medieval Encounters promotes discussion and dialogue across cultural, linguistic and disciplinary boundaries on the interactions of Jewish, Christian and Muslim cultures during the period from the fourth through to the sixteenth century C.E.

Culture is defined in its widest form to include art, all manner of history, languages, literature, medicine, music, philosophy, religion and science. The geographic limits of inquiry will be bounded only by the limits in which the traditions interacted. Confluence is also understood broadly, to allow explorations of indirect intercultural interactions and exchange, and comparative approaches are also encouraged.

Articles may deal with specific texts, events or phenomena, as well as theories of interpretations and analysis. The journal will actively promote a representative spread across all the humanistic disciplines and scholarly communities. All articles will be refereed by members of the editorial board and other scholars on the basis of their scholarly merit and the degree to which they promote our understanding of Jewish, Christian and Muslim relations in the Middle Ages. Articles may be written in English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish.

Managing editor
Ryan Szpiech
Associate Professor, Romance Languages & Judaic Studies
University of Michigan
4108 MLB, 812 E. Washington St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1275
USA
szpiech@umich.edu

to whom enquiries may be sent.

Online submission: Articles for publication in Medieval Encounters can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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For Brill's Open Access options, please click here.

Edited by Gregor Schwarb

The Index Islamicus consists of the following publications: Index Islamicus Online, the full-text searchable electronic database. Index Islamicus, the annual journal (print edition in 1 yearbook, previously 4 single issues). Index Islamicus Yearbooks , the annual yearbook (print edition available individually or as set). Supplements to the Index Islamicus, specialized bibliographies in print.

The Index Islamicus is the international classified bibliography of publications in European languages on all aspects of Islam and the Muslim world from 1906 onwards until present day. Material cited in the Index Islamicus includes not only work written about the Middle East, but also about the other main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, plus Muslim minorities elsewhere. The Index Islamicus is edited by Gregor Schwarb, Heather Bleaney, Pablo García Suárez and Susan Sinclair.

Presently, Index Islamicus contains over 575,000 records, covering all the main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, as well as Muslims living elsewhere, and their history, beliefs, societies, cultures, languages and literatures. It includes material published by Western scholars in the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences, specialist area- and subject-based areas, and by Muslims writing in European languages. Publications recorded are in the form of articles, books and book chapters. All essays and papers contained in multi-author volumes are recorded, classified and indexed separately.

Periodicals
Over 3,000 journals are surveyed for inclusion in the database, together with conference proceedings, monographs and multi-authored works. Journals and books are indexed down to the article and chapter level. Newspapers, news magazines, and government or official “grey” literature are excluded.

Requests for inclusion of a publication need to be made via this link.

Classification
The well-known Index Islamicus classification scheme, uniquely and carefully geared to the field of Islamic Studies, allows one to quickly find all literature headed under a particular, broader subject area (e.g., Education, Philosophy, Shīʿism, Sudan, Palestine, Israel, as well as their subcategories).

Extensive indexes
Those who prefer more specific queries, have in the print edition at their disposal two elaborate indexes, facilitating quick and effective searches: the subject index guides the user to material on specialised subjects not covered by the classification scheme (e.g. Al-Azhar, mawlids, railways), and also to items relevant to one subject but classified under another. The name index lists not only authors, but also editors, translators, reviewers and personal subjects. So researchers interested in, for instance, Ibn Khaldūn or Muhammad Iqbal or the Ayatollah Khomeini can quickly find publications both by and about them. The online edition offers a full text and advanced search opportunities.

The Editorial Offices are located in the Library, SOAS, University of London, http://www.soas.ac.uk and the Instituto de Lenguas y Culturas del Mediterráneo y Oriente Próximo (CCHS, CSIC) in Madrid, http://www.ilc.csic.es.

Users who would like to bring a missing item to the attention of the editors are invited to send a file with complete metadata in BibTeX, RIS, Zotero RDF, Mendeley or any other commonly used citation format to ixis[at]soas.ac.uk. Inclusion of submissions is at the discretion of the editors.