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Perspectives on Nicolas of Cusa
Editor: Inigo Bocken
This book deals with one of the main themes in the life and thinking of Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1464), the experience of conflict and the need to realise reconciliation and tolerance. The essays in this volume are discussing not only the various conflicts in which this important philosopher, theologian, mathematician and politician of the 15th century was involved, but also try to interpret the main speculative themes in his philosophical and theological works in the perspective of his historical experiences. As such, the book also delivers a contribution to a better understanding of intellectual, religious and cultural life of the 15th Century as an era of transition between late Middle Ages and Early Modernity.

Contributors include: Inigo Bocken, Tilman Borsche, Gerald Christianson, Jean-Michel Counet, Jos Decorte (†), Wilhelm Dupré, Stephan van Erp, Maarten J.F.M. Hoenen, William Hoye, Thomas Izbicki, Frans Maas, Markus Riedenauer, Nikolaus Staubach, and Anton G. Weiler.
Restraint, Stabilisation and Peace
Editor: Patrick Mileham
Jus Post bellum: Restraint, Stabilisation and Peace seeks to answer the question “is restraint in war essential for a just and lasting peace”? With a foreword by Professor Brian Orend who asserts this as “a most commendable subject” in extending Just War Theory, the book contains chapters on the ethics of war-fighting since the end of the Cold War and a look into the future of conflict. From the causes of war, with physical restraint and reconciliation in combat and political settlement, further chapters written by expert academics and military participants cover international humanitarian law, practicalities of the use of force and some of the failures in achieving safe and lasting peace in modern-day theatres of conflict.
Gender Relations in an Indonesian Society offers a comprehensive ethnography of Bugis marriage through an exploration of gender identity and sexuality in this bilateral, highly competitive, hierarchical society.

Nurul Ilmi Idrus considers the fundamental concept of siriq (honour; shame) in relation to gender socialization, courtship, sex within marriage, the regulation of sexuality between genders, the importance of kinship and status in marriage, and the dynamics of marriage, divorce, and reconciliation. This analysis considers the practical combination of Islamic tenets with local adat (custom; customary law) and the effect of contemporary Indonesia’s national ideology on cultural practices specific to Bugis society.
Editors: Yoram Meital and Paula Rayman
In these times of growing insecurity, widening inequities and deepening crisis for civilized governance, Recognition as Key for Reconciliation offers meaningful and provocative thoughts on how to advance towards a more just and peaceful future. From the intractable Israeli-Palestinian conflict we learn of “thin” and “thick” recipes for solutions. Beyond the Middle East region we learn from studies around the globe: South Africa, Northern Ireland and Armenia show the challenges to genuine recognition of our very human connection to each other, and that this recognition is essential for any sustainable positive security for all of us.

Contributors are Deina Abdelkader, Gregory Aftandilian, Dale Eickelman, Amal Jamal, Maya Kahanoff, Herbert Kelman, Yoram Meital, Victoria Montgomery, Paula M. Rayman, Albie Sachs and Nira Yuval-Davis.
In New Perspectives on Healing, Restoration and Reconciliation in John, Jacobus (Kobus) Kok investigates the depth and applicability of Jesus’ healing narratives in John’s gospel. Against the background of an ancient group-oriented worldview, it goes beyond the impasse of most Western approaches to interpreting the Biblical healing narratives to date.

He argues that the concept of healing was understood in antiquity (as in some parts of Africa) in a much broader way than we tend to understand it today. He shows inter alia why the interaction between Jesus and the Samaritan woman could be interpreted as a healing narrative, illustrating the ancient interrelationship between healing, restoration and reconciliation.
Editors: Mia Swart and Karin van Marle
The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission was a noble attempt to begin to address the continuing traumatic legacy of Apartheid. This interdisciplinary collection critiques the work of the TRC 20 years since its establishment.
Taking the paralysing political and social crises of the mid-1990s in South Africa as starting point, the book contains a collection of responses to the TRC that considers the notions of crisis, judgment and social justice. It asks whether the current political and social crises in South Africa are linked to the country’s post-apartheid transitional mechanisms, specifically, the TRC.
The fact that the material conditions of the lives of many Apartheid victims have not improved, forms a major theme of the book. Collectively, the book considers the ‘unfinished business’ of the TRC.
The Death of Christ in Graeco-Roman Metaphors
How did the first Christians interpret the death of Christ? The answer lies within the earliest Christian documents, primarily within the Pauline letters. Before the users of a modern language could hope to come near an adequate description of what was expressed in these Greek texts of the first Christians, they have to deconstruct layers of later dogmatic interpretation. They need to keep to descriptive terminology reflecting the Greek of the sources and to trace the origin of the metaphoric language early Christians like Paul used. This volume sets out to construct some of the Jewish and Greco-Roman patterns of thought which were initially utilised to express the meaning of the death of Christ.
In ordinary circumstances, one could be forgiven for assuming that sport unites rather than divides people. But, as this first in-depth study of inter-Korean sporting life and competition over more than six decades clearly demonstrates, sport has in fact been held hostage to the ups and downs of inter-Korean political relations.

The two Koreas have devoted considerable resources to developing sporting systems and securing sporting achievement globally, with important ramifications for both national pride and inter-Korean rivalry. And while the author accepts that sport and politics are close allies wherever one travels in the world, it remains the case that for the two Koreas sport plays a more significant central role in the context of the vicissitudes of the relationship across the 38th parallel and has considerable repercussions on sporting ambitions and development for both countries.

This book has wide inter-disciplinary relevance in the context of Korean studies in particular and East Asian politics and international relations in general – with special reference to the phenomenon of ‘two-state rivalry’ as was or still is the case for Germany, Yemen, Vietnam and China/Taiwan. Those pursuing sports studies in an international context will also find this volume invaluable.
This book reveals the social logic of the medieval rituals of reconciliation as showcased by the most potent rite, the kiss of peace. Ritual is presented as a contested ground on which individuals, groups, and political and moral authorities competed for and appropriated political sovereignty. The thesis of the study is that by employing ritual and bodily mnemonics as strategic tools, the forces of order and official morality strove to organize personality structures around a hegemonic value system. Researching three analytical fields—the legal bonds of peace, the emotional economy of ritual, and the building of identity—the book highlights the contents and evolution of ritual reconciliation in diverse cultural contexts in the period between the eleventh and the sixteenth centuries.