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Edited by Phillipp Mayring, Günter L. Huber, Leo Gürtler and Mechthild Kiegelmann

Mixed Methodology is a new star in the social science sky. More and more researchers are discontent with mono-method concepts for their research projects. They are trying new ways in combining or integrating different methods and methodological approaches. There are two debates in this field: the qualitative * quantitative controversy and the one-method * multi-method discourse. This book discusses those controversies and tries to give some reasons and examples for overcoming mono-method research in psychology. We think the discussion of methodological topics should not be divided from specific research projects. Only in the context of a concrete research question it makes sense to consider adequate research methods. So the volume presents examples of mixed methodologies from different fields in psychology and education, from psychiatry to organisational psychology, from learning studies to media analysis. The studies are grouped into four sections: combining qualitative methods, combining qualitative and quantitative methods, access to individual experience by mixed methods and deeper understanding of findings by mixing methods The book is adressed to all students, researchers and methodological interested people in social sciences and especially in psychology.

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Edited by Jason N. Blum

The traditions and institutions that we call religions abound with references to the supernatural: ancestral spirits, karma, the afterlife, miracles, revelation, deities, etc. How are students of religion to approach the behaviors, doctrines, and beliefs that refer to such phenomena, which by their very nature are supposed to defy the methods of empirical research and the theories of historical scholarship? That is the question of methodological naturalism. The Question of Methodological Naturalism offers ten thoughtful engagements with that perennial question for the academic study of religion. Contributors include established senior scholars and newer voices propounding a range of perspectives, resulting in both surprising points of convergence and irreconcilable differences in how our shared discipline should be conceptualized and practiced.

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Relebohile Moletsane, Ann Smith and Linda Chisholm

Methodologies for Mapping a Southern African Girlhood in the Age of Aids is located within the new and broader area of Girlhood Studies. Girls have long been considered a rich feminist memory-site for examining the genesis of women’s sense of self in the developed world. To date, however, only a few scholars have focused on Southern African girlhoods. Even fewer focus on methodologies for researching girlhood. This is despite the particular vulnerability of girls to gender-based violence and HIV and Aids, and the relative complexity of doing research with girls in diverse cultural contexts in this region. Thus, the book aims to take this agenda forward and to investigate a range of participatory methodological and theoretical approaches that can be adapted to study girls and girlhood in Southern Africa. These methodologies, which look at research with girls, about girls and for girls, include policy research, writing, fictional practice, and visual arts-based methods, to be used as analytical tools that should, can, and have been used to examine the lives of girls, particularly in the age of HIV and Aids in Southern Africa.

Investigating Classroom Interaction

Methodologies in Action

Edited by Kristiina Kumpulainen, Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver and Margarida César

This book adds a new perspective to existing research methodology literature on analyzing social interactions in the classroom. Not only does this book introduce multiple research methodologies for analyzing classroom interactions but it also demonstrates these methodologies at work in different empirical research studies. The authors of this book are all internationally well recognized for their research work on the social life of classrooms, and now, for the first time, they provide concrete accounts of the ways in which the theories and methodologies they have chosen to guide their research work function in action. These 'black boxes’ or 'tacit knowledge' of conducting different types of analyses on classroom interaction have seldom been opened up in such a concrete way in the existing research literature.
This book is an edited collection of papers introducing strands of research on classroom interaction whose logic of inquiry illuminate different approaches, analyses, and interpretations of social interactions and discourses in contemporary classroom settings. The methodological approaches discussed draw on studies of language and discourse, ethnography, as well as on sociological, psychological, and domain-specific analyses. In recognizing the complexity and challenges in mapping out the complex research territory focusing on classroom interactions, the prime goal of the book is to build a complimentary context for discussion of the ways in which different approaches to classroom interaction are realized and how they produce different analyses because of their purpose, conceptual framework, and methodological choice. The illumination of diverse approaches to classroom interaction and discourse is believed to demonstrate the potential and challenges each strand of research is likely to bring towards understanding the psychological, social and cultural life of the classroom and how these mediate the situated practice of teaching and learning in today’s schooling.
This book is targeted towards researchers and graduate students working within the field of social sciences, education and psychology. It also makes an excellent text for courses in research methodology, education, and related fields.

Following Marx

Method, Critique and Crisis

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Michael Lebowitz

What does it mean to follow Marx? In this examination of Marx’s methodology combined with specific applications on topics in political economy such as neo-Ricardian theory, analytical Marxism, the falling rate of profit, crisis theory, monopoly capital, Paul Sweezy, advertising and the capitalist state, this volume argues that the failure to understand (or explicit rejection of) Marx’s method has led astray many who consider themselves Marxists. By focusing particularly upon the concept of a totality and the necessary form of appearance of capital as many capitals in competition, Following Marx both demonstrates why Marx insisted that ‘in competition everything is reversed’ and provides a guide for following Marx.

Methods and Methodologies

Aristotelian Logic East and West, 500-1500

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Edited by Margaret Cameron and John Marenbon

Methods and Methodologies explores two questions about studying the Aristotelian tradition of logic. The first, addressed by the chapters on methods in the first half of the book, is directly about the medieval logical commentaries, treatises and handbooks. How did medieval authors in the different traditions, Latin and Arabic, go about their work on Aristotelian logic? In particular, how did they themselves conceive the relationship between logic and other branches of philosophy and disciplines outside philosophy? The second question is about methodologies, the subject of the chapters in the second half of the book: it invites writers to reflect on their own and their colleagues’ practice as twenty-first century interpreters of this medieval writing on Aristotelian logic.
Contributors are Sten Ebbesen, Christopher J. Martin, Christophe Erismann, Andrew Arlig, Simo Knuuttila, Amos Bertolacci, Jennifer Ashworth, Paul Thom, Gyula Klima, Matteo di Giovanni and Margaret Cameron.

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Edited by Cynthia A. Lassonde and Sally Galman

Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators is a comprehensive text that delineates a range of research methodologies. This edited volume, with many chapters written by self-study scholars who are noted in the field for particular methodological and epistemological perspectives, helps fill the gap in the literature on self-study research methods. It provides readers with an opportunity to examine various methodologies which will not only help them deepen their understanding of research but also, will allow them to select one that best suits their needs. Both new and experienced researchers will find this text valuable. We consider Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators a valuable contribution to the field of teacher education.

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Edited by Marcin Będkowski, Anna Brożek, Alicja Chybińska, Stepan Ivanyk and Dominik Traczykowski

This book examines the tension between formal and informal methods in philosophy. The rise of analytic philosophy was accompanied by the development of formal logic and many successful applications of formal methods. But analytical philosophy does not rely on formal methods alone. Elements of broadly understood informal logic and logical semiotics, procedures used in natural sciences and humanities, and various kinds of intuition also belong to the philosopher’s toolkit. Papers gathered in the book concern the opposition formality–informality as well as other pairs, such as methodology versus metaphilosophy, interdisciplinarity versus intradisciplinarity, and methodological uniformity versus diversity of sciences. Problems of the nature of logic and the explanatory role of mathematical theories are also discussed.

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Edited by Massimo Pendenza

Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism defends classical sociology from the accusation of ‘methodological nationalism’. To reject such accusation, the volume presents three arguments. The first contends that classical sociology has not failed to deal with the global world (Part I). The second, that classical sociology has more frequently dealt with the transnational category of the ‘social’, rather than with the ‘national’ (Part II). The third, that where classical sociology has analysed national society, the latter has never been envisaged as a rigidly confined entity within its political boundaries (Part III). The outcome is a re-evaluation of classical sociological thought as a more functional tool for analysing the political forms of modernity in the era of globalisation.

Contributors include: Vittorio Cotesta, David Inglis, Austin Harrington, Massimo Pendenza, Michael Schillmeier, Emanuela Susca, Dario Verderame, and Federico Trocini.

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Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).