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Der Ursprung des Begriffes der besten aller möglichen Welten in der Metaphysik der Willensfreiheit zwischen Antonio Perez S.J. (1599-1649) und G.W. Leibniz (1646-1716)
Author: T. Ramelow
This study investigates the origins of the concept of "the best of all possible worlds". It exemplifies the character of modern metaphysics, which thinks mainly in terms of freedom and possibility. The book contains three parts. The first part tries to reconstruct this concept both historically and systematically; it deals with the concept of possibility beginning with High Scholasticism. The second part investigates the origins of this idea in the Jesuit theory of "scientia media", which is concerned with human freedom and divine foreknowledge. The third part deals with the question, whether there is any necessity to choose the best - a main theme in late scholastic thought of the 17th century.
This investigation of a concept unknown before the time of Leibniz, reveals many new sources and fills a gap in the history of ideas.
The Non-Filamentous Species of Inland Waters
The Netherlands are a small country, characterized by a large diversity of fresh to slightly brackish, oligo- to hypereutrophic stagnant and flowing inland waters. This diversity is reflected in a remarkable richness of phytoplankton species with blue-green algae as an important component.
Identification of phytoplankton frequently brings on serious problems, due to the scarcity of up-to-date floras. This book, written by an acknowledged Dutch phytoplankton expert, presents a new modern approach to the identification of phytoplankton of The Netherlands.
• treats 95 species belonging to 23 genera of non-filamentous blue-green algae in the plankton of Dutch inland waters including one new genus and 15 new species
• nomenclature according to modern insights and in agreement with international rules
• 500 original black-and-white photographs show all the details necessary for light-microscopical identification
• contains an identification key to the species and comparing every species to similar forms
• information on ecology and occurrence in different water types
• relevant literature references
The Intersection of International Law, Agricultural Biotechnology, and Infectious Disease is an indispensable resource for practitioners and scholars interested in public health, food safety, or biotechnology. It provides a comprehensive overview of the science behind, and the general environmental frameworks addressing, GMOs. The book examines legal frameworks and perspectives for infectious disease and GMOs, as well as public health legislation, international trade legislation, and regulatory regimes. Finally, it provides critiques and proposals, arguing for a more connective approach for future regulation.
Author: Lars T. Lih
Lenin’s What is to Be Done? (1902) has long been seen as the founding document of a 'party of a new type'. For some, it provided a model of ‘vanguard party’ that was the essence of Bolshevism, for others it manifested Lenin’s élitist and manipulatory attitude towards the workers.
This substantial new commentary, based on contemporary Russian- and German-language sources, provides hitherto unavailable contextual information that undermines these views and shows how Lenin's argument rests squarely on an optimistic confidence in the workers' revolutionary inclinations and on his admiration of German Social Democracy in particular. Lenin's outlook cannot be understood, Lih claims here, outside the context of international Social Democracy, the disputes within Russian Social Democracy and the institutions of the revolutionary underground.
The new translation focuses attention on hard-to-translate key terms. This study raises new and unsettling questions about the legacy of Marx, Bolshevism as a historical force, and the course of Soviet history, but, most of all, it will revolutionise the conventional interpretations of Lenin.
Approaching the Role of Food and Drink in Isaiah's Structure and Message
In Eating in Isaiah Andrew Abernethy employs a sequential-synchronic approach to explore the role of eating in the structure and message of the book of Isaiah. By focusing on 'scaffolding' chapters (Isaiah 1; 36–37; 55; 65-66), avenues open for exploring how eating operates within the major sections of Isaiah and how the motif enhances the book's coherence. Furthermore, occurrences of eating in Isaiah create networks of association that grant perspective on significant topics in the book's message, such as Zion, YHWH’s kingship, and YHWH's servants. Amidst growing scholarly interest in food and drink within biblical literature, Eating in Isaiah demonstrates how eating can operate at a literary level within a prophetic book.
Author: Adrian T. Smith
In The Representation of Speech Events in Chariton's Callirhoe and the Acts of the Apostles, Adrian T. Smith summarizes cross-linguistic research on how and why narrators vary the formulae that introduce direct speech. This research is applied to Chariton and to Acts. The findings demonstrate that narrators vary quotation formulae for numerous pragmatic purposes, including the tracking of conversational dynamics via a set of 'marked' and 'unmarked' quotation devices.