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Anti-Judaism and Antisemitism in Medieval and Early Modern Visual Culture
In thirteen essays by leading art historians, and a critical introduction by the editor, Beyond the Yellow Badge seeks to reframe the relationship between European visual culture and the changing aspect of the Christian majority’s negative conceptions of Jews and Judaism during the Middle Ages and early modern periods. By situating their subjects within a broad continuum of historical and critical issues, the authors inquire into such questions as the shifting politics of toleration and intoleration; the role played by anti-Judaic legends in the formation of Christian cults; the role of positive evaluations of Hebrew, Jewish learning and Christian hopes for Jewish conversion; and the transformation of religious anti-Judaism into its modern racial and nationalistic counterparts. The book will be of special interest to art historians, cultural historians, students of Christian theology and Jewish history, and to educated general readers.

This book is also available in paperback.
Anti-Semitic Trials and the Press in the Early German Empire
Historians have generally assumed that the French Dreyfus Affair had no counterpart in turn-of-the-century Germany. However, while no single anti-Semitic trial in Germany had the social and political impact of the Dreyfus Affair, a series of sensational court cases did have a significant influence on the growth and development of anti-Semitism in Imperial Germany. These trials, which included prominent libel cases and several ritual murder accusations, frequently spurred debates in the German press about the nature of Judaism and the role and influence of Jews in German society. This book examines the nature of these anti-Semitic affairs, assesses their role in German politics, and evaluates their effect on the overall development of German anti-Semitism.
This book describes a circle of Eastern European Kabbalists that established Hasidism, an important movement that has influenced Jewish Mysticism, Yiddish culture and Hebrew literature. It uncovers the messianic motivation, concealed in Hasidic writings after the failure of their 1740-1781 attempts to hurry redemption.
The book opens with the Besht, the legendary founder of Hasidism, and continues with the first Hasidic court, founded by one of his prominent disciples, the preacher of Zlotshov. The group’s redemptive activities are revealed through their mystical rituals, their self-image as representatives of the ten Sefirot, and the status of their leader, “the Righteous One,” as a vivid symbol of the divine influx.
The book is especially important for scholars and students of Judaism as well as scholars of mysticism and messianism, seeking to comprehend the transformation of a messianic circle of devotees into a mass movement that changes the culture of an entire nation.
King Manuel I and the End of Religious Tolerance (1496-7)
In 1496-7, King Manuel I of Portugal forced the Jews of his kingdom to convert to Christianity and expelled all his Muslim subjects. Portugal was the first kingdom of the Iberian Peninsula to end definitively Christian-Jewish-Muslim coexistence, creating an exclusively Christian realm. Drawing upon narrative and documentary sources in Portuguese, Spanish and Hebrew, this book pieces together the developments that led to the events of 1496-7 and presents a detailed reconstruction of the persecution. It challenges widely held views concerning the impact of the arrival in Portugal of the Jews expelled from Castile in 1492, the diplomatic wrangling that led to the forced conversion of the Portuguese Jews in 1497 and the causes behind the expulsion of the Muslim minority.
Essays in Honor of the 75th Birthday of Professor Antony Polonsky
Warsaw was once home to the largest and most diverse Jewish community in the world. It was a center of rich varieties of Orthodox Judaism, Jewish Socialism, Diaspora Nationalism, Zionism, and Polonization. This volume is the first to reflect on the entire history of the Warsaw Jewish community, from its inception in the late 18th century to its emergence as a Jewish metropolis within a few generations, to its destruction during the German occupation and tentative re-emergence in the postwar period. The highly original contributions collected here investigate Warsaw Jewry’s religious and cultural life, press and publications, political life, and relations with the surrounding Polish society. This monumental volume is dedicated to Professor Antony Polonsky, chief historian of the new Warsaw Museum for the History of Polish Jews, on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

This book is also available in paperback.
This book represents a multi-disciplinary approach to the problem of the Jews and the German Reformation. The contributions come from both senior and emerging scholars, from North America, Israel, and Europe, to ensure a breadth in perspective. The essays in this volume are arranged under four broad headings: 1. The Road to the Reformation (late medieval theology and the humanists and the Jews), 2. The Reformers and the Jews (essays on Luther, Melanchthon, Bucer, Zwingli, Calvin, Osiander, the Catholic Reformers, and the Radical Reformers), 3. Representations of Jews and Judaism (the portrayal of Judaism as a religion, images of the Jews in the visual arts, and in sixteenth-century German literature), and 4. Jewish Responses to the Reformation.

Contributors include: Dean Phillip Bell, Jay Berkovitz, Robert Bireley, Stephen G. Burnett, Elisheva Carlebach, Achim Detmers, Yaacov Deutsch, Maria Diemling, Michael Driedger, R. Gerald Hobbs, Joy Kammerling, Thomas Kaufmann, Hans-Martin Kirn, Christopher Ocker, Erika Rummel, Petra Schöner, Timothy J. Wengert, and Edith Wenzel.