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  • Languages of Continental South-East Asia x

Statecraft and Classical Learning

The Rituals of Zhou in East Asian History

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Edited by Benjamin Elman and Martin Kern

Statecraft and Classical Learning is devoted to the Rituals of Zhou, one of the ancient Chinese Classics. In addition to its canonical stature in classical learning, the massive text was of unique significance to the pre-modern statecraft of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam where it served as the classical paradigm for government structure and was often invoked in movements of political reform. The present volume, with contributions from twelve leading North American, European, and East Asian scholars, is the first in any language to illuminate the Rituals in both dimensions. It presents a multi-faceted and fascinating picture of the life of the text from its inception some two millennia ago to its modern political and scholarly discourse.

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Edited by Gülru Necipoğlu

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Muqarnas 28 contains articles on a number of topics including shadow puppets, the concept of fann, Byzantine and Ottoman architecture, and seventeenth-century Persian painting. The "Notes and Sources" section includes a discussion of an early fifteenth-century Khamsa in the Bryn Mawr College Library.

Contributors include: Alain George, Marcus Milwright, Adam Mestyan, Amy S. Landau, Lisa Golombek, Suna Çağaptay, Doris Behrens-Abouseif, Filiz Çağman and Zeren Tanındı, Yael Rice, and †Oleg Grabar

Dressing up for War

Transformations of Gender and Genre in the Discourse and Literature of War

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Edited by Aránzazu Usandizaga and Andrew Monnickendam

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Edited by Gülru Necipoğlu

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Muqarnas 29 features a subset of articles involving cross-cultural interactions between East and West as manifested in the visual culture of the region. Articles addressing this theme include “Visual Cosmopolitanism and Creative Translation: Artistic Conversations with Renaissance Italy in Mehmed II’s Constantinople,” by Gülru Necipoğlu, and “The Bride of Trebizond: Turks And Turkmens on a Florentine Wedding Chest, circa 1460,” by Cristelle Baskins. The “Notes and Sources” section highlights new research on the medieval town of Hulbuk in Central Asia.

Contributors include: Gülru Necipoğlu, Cristelle Baskins, Ana Pulido-Rull, Matt D. Saba, Jasmin Badr, Mustafa Tupev, Ünver Rustem, Ethem Eldem and Pierre Siméon.

Muqarnas, Volume 8

K. A. C. Creswell and His Legacy

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Edited by Grabar

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In Muqarnas articles are published on all aspects of Islamic visual culture, historical and contemporary, as well as articles dealing with unpublished textual primary sources.

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Mor Altshuler

This book describes a circle of Eastern European Kabbalists that established Hasidism, an important movement that has influenced Jewish Mysticism, Yiddish culture and Hebrew literature. It uncovers the messianic motivation, concealed in Hasidic writings after the failure of their 1740-1781 attempts to hurry redemption.
The book opens with the Besht, the legendary founder of Hasidism, and continues with the first Hasidic court, founded by one of his prominent disciples, the preacher of Zlotshov. The group’s redemptive activities are revealed through their mystical rituals, their self-image as representatives of the ten Sefirot, and the status of their leader, “the Righteous One,” as a vivid symbol of the divine influx.
The book is especially important for scholars and students of Judaism as well as scholars of mysticism and messianism, seeking to comprehend the transformation of a messianic circle of devotees into a mass movement that changes the culture of an entire nation.

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Edited by Oleg Grabar

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In Muqarnas articles are published on all aspects of Islamic visual culture, historical and contemporary, as well as articles dealing with unpublished textual primary sources.

Muqarnas, Volume 6

An Annual on Islamic Art and Architecture

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Oleg Grabar

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In Muqarnas articles are published on all aspects of Islamic visual culture, historical and contemporary, as well as articles dealing with unpublished textual primary sources.

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Edited by Oleg Grabar

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by The Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In Muqarnas articles are published on all aspects of Islamic visual culture, historical and contemporary, as well as articles dealing with unpublished textual primary sources.

"And Never Know the Joy"

Sex and the Erotic in English Poetry

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Edited by C.C. Barfoot

“And Never Know the Joy” : Sex and the Erotic in English Poetry promises the reader much to enjoy and to reflect on: riddles and sex games; the grammar of relationships; the cunning psychology of bodily fantasies; sexuality as the ambiguous performance of words; the allure of music and its instruments; the erotics of death and remembrance, are just a few of the initial themes that emerge from the twenty-five articles to be found in this volume, with many an invitation “to seize the day”. Reproduction, pregnancy, and fear; discredited and degraded libertines; the ventriloquism of sexual objects; the ease with which men are reduced to impotence by the carnality of women; orgasm and melancholy; erotic mysticism and religious sexuality; the potency and dangers of fruit and flowers; the delights of the recumbent male body and of dancing girls; the fertile ritual use of poetic texts; striptease and revolution; silent women reclaimed as active vessels, are amongst the many engaging topics that emerge out of the ongoing and entertaining scholarly discussion of sex and eroticism in English poetry.