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The Assessment of Individual Complaints by the European Court of Human Rights under Article 3 ECHR and the United Nations Committee against Torture under Article 3 CAT
This volume offers a comprehensive analysis and comparison of the case law and practice of the European Court of Human Rights and the United Nations Committee against Torture in individual cases concerning the principle of non-refoulement. It covers both procedural and material aspects relevant in expulsion and extradition cases submitted by individuals under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) or Article 3 of the United Nations Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT).

The book is a particularly helpful tool for asylum lawyers, human rights advocates, and other practitioners. It is also a reference work of significant value to scholars interested in non-refoulement under both conventions and in the context of human rights or refugee law in general.

The Practice of International Criminal Tribunals
Judicial Dialogue on Human Rights offers a critical legal perspective on the manner in which international criminal tribunals select, (re-)interpret and apply the principles and standards formulated by the European Court of Human Rights. A part of the book is devoted to testing the assumption that the current practice of cross-referencing, though widespread, is incoherent in method and erratic in substance. Notable illustrations analysed in the book include the nullum crimen principle, prohibition of torture, hearsay evidence and victims’ rights. Another section of the book seeks to devise a methodologically sound ‘grammar’ of judicial dialogue, focussing on how and when human rights concepts may be transferred into the context of international criminal justice.
Autonomy, Identity and Integrity under the European Convention on Human Rights
Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights provides a right to respect for one’s private life. The European Court of Human Rights has interpreted this provision broadly to include a right to personal autonomy, identity and integrity. The book examines these concepts by interconnecting case law from the Court with the philosophical debates, including those in feminism, in four parts: (1) personal freedom and human rights law (2) privacy and personal autonomy (3) personal identity (4) bodily and moral integrity. The author notes, through her analysis of the Court’s case law, that different versions of freedom are evident in the jurisprudence, including one which may restrict human freedom rather than enhance it through human rights law. This book will be invaluable to scholars of the Court, human rights and issues of the self.
Standards on Judicial Scrutiny and Evidence in International and European Asylum Law
What do international and EU law require from the national asylum judge with regard to the intensity of judicial scrutiny to be applied and evidentiary issues? To answer that question, an analysis is made of the provisions on national judicial proceedings contained in the Refugee Convention (RC), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the UN Convention against Torture (CAT), the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights. In addition, the assessment as performed by the UN Human Rights Committee, the UN Committee against Torture and the European Court of Human Rights in cases concerning the expulsion of asylum seekers is analysed.
Community asylum law is becoming ever more essential to asylum law in Europe. But many intricate questions about this new body of law remain to be resolved. Do the Community rules weaken or improve the position of asylum seekers? Would a future Community asylum law have to observe international norms? What role should the Court of Justice play in asylum matters? And does the communautarisation of asylum law affect the possibilities of asylum seekers to approach domestic courts, or the European Court of Human Rights? These and other questions are addressed in this book. It offers, besides an in-depth study of the relation between European and international asylum law, a practical manual for European asylum law. It discusses the content and meaning of all Community regulations and directives on asylum, as well as their possible use (and reliability) in domestic proceedings.
A Spanish Perspective
This work offers a Spanish perspective on contemporary practice in international law and European Community law by genuine practitioners such as registrars, judges and magistrates serving on national and international courts, as well as advocates practicing in these courts, senior international officials, government advisers and academics. In five parts this book deals with the practice in international courts; practice in international organizations; the European Community practice and; Spanish practice in matters of public and private international law. The last part contains an article on evidence in international practice and a general overview for further research. The book offers a very useful insight in matters otherwise available in Spanish, such as the applications against Spain lodged with the European Court of Human Rights, a comparison between the Spanish Constitutional Court and the Court of Justice of the European Communities, public international law before Spanish domestic courts and the Spanish practice on investment treaties.
Between Collective Enforcement of Human Rights and International Dispute Settlement
The Inter-State Application under the European Convention on Human Rights provides the first comprehensive monograph about the State-to-State human rights enforcement mechanism. The functions of the mechanism include also dispute settlement aspects, which are related to the compulsory jurisdiction of the Strasbourg Court. The study provides a full account of the development of the Inter-State Application under Article 33 ECHR and puts its case law in the relevant historical and institutional context. The analysis concludes with detailed reform considerations which are situated within the discussion about the role of the European Court of Human Rights. The focus lies on the possibility to address and improve systemic human rights deficits beyond the single case. The Court’s growing inter-State docket evidences the need for legal certainty.

In this study, Eman Hamdan examines the protection against refoulement under the European Convention on Human Rights and the UN Convention against Torture, with the aim to determine which of those Conventions affords better protection for international protection seekers.
Hamdan explores the scope and content of the principle of non-refoulement under both Conventions and the application of the principle to the immigration control measures and the extraordinary rendition operations.
The author provides a comprehensive and comparative analysis of the case-law of both the European Court of Human Rights and the UN Committee against Torture on the procedural and substantive aspects of the principle of non-refoulement, in order to help practitioners to determine which of these human rights treaty bodies is more favorable for their specific non-refoulement case.

This book was chosen to participate in the Professor Walther Hug Prize 2014-2015, which is a prize for the best legal researches in Switzerland for each academic year.
Liber Amicorum Lucius Caflisch
Editor: Marcelo Kohen
This Liber Amicorum is published at the occasion of Judge Lucius Caflisch’s retirement from a distinguished teaching career at the Graduate Institute of International Studies of Geneva, where he served as Professor of International Law for more than three decades, and where he has also held the position of Director. It was written by his colleagues and friends, from the European Court of Human Rights, from universities all around the world, from the Swiss Foreign Affairs Ministry and many other national and international institutions.
The Liber Amicorum Lucius Caflisch covers different fields in which Judge Caflisch has excelled in his various capacities, as scholar, representative of Switzerland in international conferences, legal adviser of the Swiss Foreign Affairs Ministry, counsel, registrar, arbitrator and judge. This collective work is divided into three main sections. The first section examines questions concerning human rights and international humanitarian law. The second section is devoted to the international law of spaces, including matters regarding the law of the sea, international waterways, Antarctica, and boundary and territorial issues. The third section addresses issues related to the peaceful settlement of disputes, both generally and with regard to any particular means of settlement. The contributions are in both English and French.
Essays in Honour of Budislav Vukas
For the Liber Amicorum, dedicated to Professor Budislav Vukas, his colleagues and former students have contributed essays on topical issues of contemporary international law, primarily in the fields that were the focus of Professor Vukas’s interest during his long-lasting academic and international career at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Law, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, the International Labour Organization, the Institut de Droit International and many other law schools and international institutions and organizations. The essays in this collection, thus, deal with current developments concerning the subjects of international law (i.a. jurisdictional immunities of states, responsibility of states, international organizations, other non-state entities), the law of the sea (i.a. jurisdictional zones, delimitation, piracy, underwater cultural heritage protection, fisheries, land-locked states), human rights law, including minorities’ protection (i.a. European Court of Human Rights, humanitarian assistance, protection in the event of disasters, social and labour rights, rights of the child), and dispute settlement (i.a. International Court of Justice, International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, arbitration, diplomatic means). Of the 49 essays written by scholars and practitioners from different parts of the world six are in French.