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The Cambridge Colloquia
Editor: T.J. Cribb
This book is the record of a colloquium held at Churchill College, Cambridge. It pursues lines of discussion radiating out from the core theme of the power of the image (understood in its pictorial, iconic, sensory and verbal senses). Writers, scholars and artists are grouped in pairs representing the two language-cultures (English and French). Central topics covered include the manifold ways in which our readings of pictorial images old and contemporary can bridge cultures, language politics and the politics of culture, the limitless and instructive senses of the concept of the ‘word’, the relation between orality and the written text, the implications of the act of writing, history and opera, the word in theatre, the influence of the Nobel Prize…. The terms of discussion universally urbane, effortlessly wide-ranging and deeply probing. Most importantly – and a reminder of how best to ensure literate wisdom in intercultural debate – is the fact that the contributors gathered here have avoided all ‘pre-packaging’ of their reflections in the shibboleth ‘discourses' (whether Freudian, poststructuralist, postmodern or postcolonial) of our time.
Contributors are: Anthony Kwame Appiah, Biyi Bandele, Jacques Chevrier, Tim Cribb, Irène d’Almeida, Casimir d’Angelo, Assia Djebar, Akin Euba, Christiane Fioupou, Lorna Goodison, Wilson Harris, Marika Hedin, Gerard Houghton, Abiola Irele, Anny King, John Kinsella, Henri Lopés, Daniel Maximin, Femi Osofisan, Niyi Osundare, Ato Quayson, Alain Ricard, Tracy Ryan, Julien Sinzogan, Alioune Sow, Wole Soyinka, George Steiner, Véronique Tadjo, Maria Tippett, Olabiyi Yaï
On Reduplication is a study of the logical properties of reduplicative propositions, that is, of propositions having qualifications, like 'Christ qua God is a creature' and 'being qua being is the subject of metaphysics'. The focus is on what ways qualifications change the truth value and the inference patterns of simple, categorical propositions. The central class of reduplications is that in which the qualifications are introduced by a qua connective like ' qua', 'insofar as', 'under the concept of', or 'in virtue of the fact that'. Reduplicative propositions occur frequently and importantly in both traditional and contemporary philosophical works, but there has been little modern analysis of them.
This study presents, compares and analyzes the different theories of reduplication that have arisen in Western philosophy. Texts are presented and explicated, and their significance is weighed relative to modern logical theory. Throughout this study, some important applications of theories of reduplication are noted, such as Leibniz's qualification of the principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles, Ockham's reduction of abstract entities, and Aquinas's view on the Incarnation.
Studies of Evidence for Private Religion and its Material Environment in the City of Ostia (100-500 AD)
This study deals with hitherto unpublished evidence of private religious practice, found in the ruins of Ostia. The selected environment consists of domus, rented apartments, workshops, depots, shops, bars, markets, hotels, and also all mithraea and the compita. These chapters contain concise introductions to the categories of buildings, including lists, notes on the dates, appearance, lay-out, size and distribution, and notes on the owners, inhabitants, visitors, workers and personnel.
Editor: R.T. Griffiths
During the 1950's the West European Socialist parties found themselves divided on the question of "European integration". This cleavage not only separated different national parties from each other but caused deep and painful rifts within national parties themselves. The related controversies form the core of this volume, consisting of a synthetic analysis, thirteen national case studies, and testimonies of three "eyewitnesses" (Marinus van der Goes van Naters, Christian Pineau, Mario Zagari) closely involved with the events described. The collection deals with an important aspect of the pre-history of the European Economic Community and provides a useful tool for its comparative study.
In the eighth book of his treatise Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie, Richard Hooker defends the royal headship of the Church of England in a remarkable series of theological arguments. His apologetic intention was 'to resolve the consciences' of the Disciplinarian-Puritan critics of the Elizabethan Settlement by a demonstration that the Royal Supremacy was wholly consistent with the principles of doctrinal orthodoxy as understood and upheld by the Magisterial Reformation.
This study commences with a look at some current problems of interpretation and then examines Hooker's apologetic aim and methodology. Subsequent chapters demonstrate Hooker's reliance on the teaching of the Magisterial Reformers in the formulation of both the soteriological foundations of his political thought and his ecclesiology. Hooker's appeal to the authority of Patristic Christological and Trinitarian Orthodoxy in support of the Royal Supremacy is also discussed.
The purpose of this book is to uncover the theological roots of a central aspect of Hooker's political thought, and thereby to attempt to shed new light on an important Elizabethan controversy.
Bushido and Barbed Wire
This is the first in-depth study to examine the history, treatment and conditions of more than 2500 Japanese prisoners of war who were captured by British forces on the Burma front and kept in India during the period 1942-46. Drawing on original sources, including the National Archive of India, the International Committee of the Red Cross, as well as limited government records in the UK, USA and Japan, together with some former Japanese POWs’ first-hand accounts, the author has been able to provide a detailed picture of the way of life of these prisoners, the organization of camp life, as well as the policies that governed their incarceration. In so doing, the author fills a significant gap both in Pacific War studies and prisoner-of-war history. The manner of the capture and surrender of the Japanese was unique, in that they were captured, for the most part, when they were either seriously wounded or sick, or had become unconscious due to hunger or disease while fighting on the Arakan, Imphal and Kohima (Burma) fronts. A few in good health gave themselves up; but there was no mass surrender, even by a single regiment or unit, ever took place, thus giving rise to the myth that no Japanese soldier ever became a prisoner of war. This account sets the history straight and will be widely welcomed by the generalist and specialist alike, particularly those studying the history of this period, including POW history, as well as students of international law and the work of international agencies, such as the Red Cross.