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The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established for further in-depth research in the area of international law.
The topic for 2005 was: The Cultural Heritage of Mankind.
Swedish Perspectives on the Rule of Law
Editor: Per Sevastik
Since the early 1960s an essential ingredient of Sweden's international development aid has been focused on democracy and human rights issues and Sweden has been refining its policy continuously within this area. Today this policy has reached a certain degree of sophistication and therefore a natural focal point is on the development of the rule of law in various recipient countries. When and why was it introduced in Swedish development assistance? What does it actually entail? These and other issues related to assistance within the legal sector are discussed in this anthology written by university professors, researchers and lecturers from various law faculties and institutions in Sweden familiar with the developmental work which is channelled through the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency (SIDA). It encapsulates both actual conditions and ideas outlining future perspectives.
The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations froms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established to further in-depth research in the area of international law. The topic for 1995 was The International Aspects of Natural and Industrial Catastrophes/ Les aspects internationaux des catastrophes naturelles et industrielles.
The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established for further in-depth research in the area of international law.
The topic for 2007 was: Rules and Institutions of International Humanitarian Law Put to the Test of Recent Armed Conflicts .
The Politics of Socio-Economic Rights in South Africa
What are the prospects and means of achieving development through a democratic politics of socio-economic rights? Starting from the position that socio-economic rights are as legally and normatively valid as civil and political rights, this anthology explores the politics of acquiring and transforming socio-economic rights in South Africa. The book brings together an interdisciplinary group of leading scholars in an examination of the multifaceted politics of social and economic policy-making, rights-based political struggles and socio-economic rights litigations. The post-apartheid South African experience shows that there is no guarantee that democracy will eliminate poverty or reduce social inequality, but also that democratic institutions and politics may provide important means for asserting interests and rights in regard to development. Thus it is argued that democratic politics of socio-economic rights may democratise development while also developing democracy.
Collected Essays
This volume comprises thirteen articles each written to provide an exposition and analysis of a specific topic drawn from the European Convention on Human Rights. Many of these topics are either explored for the first time or from a novel perspective. All the topics are examined and presented from a critical standpoint and some important judgments of the European Court of Human Rights are taken to task. Some of the essays have been previously published in a variety of legal periodicals, and have been reproduced in this volume in order to make them more widely accessible.
Geographical Implications for the United States
In 1986, Lewis M. Alexander, a world-renowned marine geographer, prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense a report, Navigational Restrictions within the New LOS Context: Geographical Implications for the United States.

Edited by J. Ashley Roach, the reformatted report is presented in five sections and includes 20 maps, illustrating the world’s international straits and major ocean navigation routes. Forty-three tables present the most comprehensive descriptions of the world’s straits used for international navigation, as well as identify various categories of maritime claims. What made the Report extraordinarily valuable in 1986, and which makes it equally valuable today, is the compilation of geographic data - not available elsewhere - describing the world’s straits used for international navigation and illustrations of the chokepoints and major international shipping trade routes.

Roach has faithfully reproduced Alexander’s seminal work by retaining the original structure and references. A table of defined terms and an index have been added.
In a relatively short time the concept of “sustainable development” has become firmly established in the field of international law. The World Commission on Environment and Development concisely defined sustainable development as follows: “development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. This definition takes into account the needs of both the present and future generations as well as the capacity of the earth and its natural resources which by clear implication should not be depleted by a small group of people (in industrialized countries).
The aim of this book is threefold : to review the genesis and to clarify the meaning of the concept of sustainable development, as well as to assess its status within public international law. Furthermore, it examines the legal principles that have emerged in the pursuit of sustainable development. Lastly, it assesses to what extent the actual evolution of law demonstrates the balance and integration with all pertinent fields of international law as urged by the Rio, Johannesburg, and World Summit documents. This is the second volume in the Hague Academy of International Law Pocket Book series; it contains the text of the course given at the Hague Academy by Professor Schrijver.

Cet ouvrage répond à trois objectifs : examiner la naissance du concept de développement durable, clarifier sa signification et évaluer son statut dans le droit international public. Il examine également les principes juridiques nés de la poursuite du développement durable. Enfin, il examine l’évolution actuelle du droit par rapport aux exigences énoncées à Rio, à Johannesburg et au cours du dernier sommet mondial en ce qui concerne l’intégration du concept de développement durable dans tous les domaines pertinents du droit international.
The secession of States is subject to legal regulation. The arguments presented by States in the advisory proceedings on Kosovo confirm that
there are rules of international law that determine whether the secession of a State in the post-colonial world is permissible. These rules derive
from the competing principles of self-determination and territorial integrity. In deciding whether to recognize a secessionist entity as a
State, or to admit it to the United Nations, States must balance these competing principles, with due regard to precedent and State practice.
These lectures examine cases in which secession has succeeded (such as Israel and Bangladesh), in which it has failed (such as Biafra and
Chechnya) and in which a determination is still to be made (Kosovo, Abkhazia and South Ossetia).