Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Art History x

Series:

Edited by Chibueze C. Udeani, Friedrich Reiterer and Klaus Zapotoczky

Religion is today mainly present in the consciousness of people through keywords like fundamentalism, global conflict or violence. But as what is religion understood and how does it affect the society are questions that need to be examined separately. The contributions in this volume will examine the sub-questions that pose themselves in this light: 1) What influence does religion exercise on our social life forms? 2) What are the religious societal prerequisites? And how is visible religion affected by these? 3) How do these questions present themselves both externally and internally in the contemporary perception?

Series:

Andrew T. Coates

What is Protestant Art? presents an introduction to Protestant visual culture from the Reformation to the present. Examining historical images as evidence of changing practices and attitudes, Andrew T. Coates explores three major themes in the history of Protestant visual culture: 1) the religious work of images, 2) the relationship between word and image, 3) the power of the Bible and its visual representation. The book analyses images such as prints, paintings, maps of the ‘Holy Land,’ and Bible illustrations to demonstrate the broad range of images that could be classified as Protestant ‘art.’ This work argues that the variety of images and visual practices throughout Protestant history might better be described by the term ‘visual culture’ than ‘art.’

Series:

Laura Rediehs

Quakerism (the Religious Society of Friends) emerged in the seventeenth century, during a time when philosophical debates about the nature of knowledge led to the emergence of modern science. The Quakers, in conversation with early modern philosophers, developed a distinctive epistemology rooted in their concept of the Light Within: a special internal sense giving access to divine insight. The Light Within provided illumination both to properly understand the Bible and to ‘read’ the Book of Nature. In , L. Rediehs argues that Quaker epistemology can be thought of as an expanded experiential empiricism, integrating ethical and religious knowledge with scientific knowledge. This epistemology has carried through in Quaker thought to the present day and can help address today’s epistemological crisis. This work will be of great interest to both philosophers interested in the epistemological implications of Quaker thought, and scholars of Quaker Studies interested in connecting Quaker thought to philosophical historical epistemology.

Quaker Studies: An Overview

The Current State of the Field

Series:

C. Wess Daniels, Robynne Rogers Healey and Jon R. Kershner

In this introductory volume to the Brill Research Perspectives series on Quaker Studies, Quaker Studies, An Overview: The Current State of the Field, C. Wess Daniels, Robynne Rogers Healey, and Jon Kershner investigate Quaker Studies, divided into the three fields of history, theology and philosophy, and sociology. With a focus on schisms, transatlantic networks, colonialism, abolition, gender and equality, and pacifism from Quaker origins onward, Healey explores the rich diversity and complexity of research and interpretation that has emerged in Quaker history. Kershner explores comparisons and divergences in contemporary Quaker theology and philosophy. Special attention is paid to Quaker biblical hermeneutics, mysticism, ethics, epistemology and Global Quakerism. Daniels looks at the sociology of Quakerism as a new field of study that has only recently begun to be explored and developed. He surveys the field of sociological work done within Quakerism from the 1960s to the present day.

Pentecostal Theology and Ecumenical Theology

Interpretations and Intersections

Series:

Edited by Peter Hocken, Tony L. Richie and Christopher A. Stephenson

Pentecostal Theology and Ecumenical Theology: Interpretations, Intersections, and Inspirations brings together globally recognized and newer scholars to address the complex relationship between Pentecostalism and the Ecumenical Movement. Historical essays address topics such as early Pentecostal responses to and participation in ecumenism, explicit convergences between Pentecostal and ecumenical initiatives, and the particular contributions of Pentecostals and ecumenists outside North America and Europe. Constructive theological essays address intersections between ecumenical theology and systematic loci in Pentecostal perspective, in the hope that mutual exchange and criticism will lead to ways to improve both. Never before have this many scholars of Pentecostalism combined their efforts in order to focus on the relationship between Pentecostal theology and ecumenical theology past, present, and future.

Anthropology and Biblical Studies

Avenues of Approach

Edited by Louise J. Lawrence and Mario I. Aguilar

Presents the findings of an international research symposium, held at St Andrews University, Scotland, in July 2003. Contributors include both biblical scholars and anthropologists. The essays presented variously explore and review interdisciplinary links, innovations and developments between anthropology and biblical studies in reference to interpretation of both the OT and NT and pseudepigraphal works. Explored are methodological issues, the use of anthropological concepts in biblical studies (identity; purity boundaries; virtuoso religion; spiritual experience; sacred space) and more ‘field orientated’ work of bible translators in different cultures.

Series:

Ilsup Ahn

In an age of global migration, how should Christian theologians and church leaders respond to its various challenges and problems? What is a fundamental theological framework with which we are to engage in them? In this volume, Ilsup Ahn attempts to answer these questions by presenting a “Trinitarian theology of migration.” In doing so, he first provides an overview of recent theological works on migration by introducing their key theological insights. A Trinitarian theology of migration becomes possible as we begin to see that the three Sacred Persons (the Son, the Father, and the Holy Spirit) are distinctively, yet intrinsically involved with the phenomenon of human migration within God’s grand vision of liberation and redemption. From a Trinitarian theological perspective, in all stages of human migration from taking leave to getting integrated, migrants and citizens are called to join in God’s liberative and redemptive works for all the people of God.

Series:

Scott Blakemore

Scholars are seeking to identify how to constructively integrate faith into diplomacy. Proponents of faith-based diplomacy recognise that incorporating faith into peacemaking activities assists in managing identity-based conflict and religiously motivated violence in the contemporary international system. A promising strategy within the scope of faith-based diplomacy is interfaith dialogue. The study and practice of interfaith dialogue has been reinvigorated since the advent of 9/11, and yet the link between interfaith dialogue and diplomacy remains underdeveloped. The cases of Indonesia and the United States present lessons on how states can effectively use interfaith dialogue to achieve policy objectives, while recognising that some policies are detrimental to achieving diplomatic goals. This paper seeks to provide some framework for bringing interfaith dialogue into the scope of diplomacy by illuminating how faith-based diplomacy and interfaith dialogue can be innovative diplomatic perspectives useful in addressing contemporary global issues.

Faith in African Lived Christianity

Bridging Anthropological and Theological Perspectives

Series:

Edited by Karen Lauterbach and Mika Vähäkangas

Faith in African Lived Christianity – Bridging Anthropological and Theological Perspectives offers a comprehensive, empirically rich and interdisciplinary approach to the study of faith in African Christianity. The book brings together anthropology and theology in the study of how faith and religious experiences shape the understanding of social life in Africa. The volume is a collection of chapters by prominent Africanist theologians, anthropologists and social scientists, who take people’s faith as their starting point and analyze it in a contextually sensitive way. It covers discussions of positionality in the study of African Christianity, interdisciplinary methods and approaches and a number of case studies on political, social and ecological aspects of African Christian spirituality.

Series:

Peter H. Sedgwick

In The Origins of Anglican Moral Theology Peter H. Sedgwick shows how Anglican moral theology has a distinctive ethos, drawing on Scripture, Augustine, the medieval theologians (Abelard, Aquinas and Scotus), and the great theologians of the Reformation, such as Luther and Calvin. A series of studies of Tyndale, Perkins, Hooker, Sanderson and Taylor shows the flourishing of this discipline from 1530 to 1670. Anglican moral theology has a coherence which enables it to engage in dialogue with other Christian theological traditions and to present a deeply pastoral but intellectually rigorous theological position. This book is unique because the origins of Anglican moral theology have never been studied in depth before.