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Damages in Investor-State Arbitration

Current Issues and Challenges

Series:

Irmgard Marboe

Damages in Investor-State Arbitration: Current Issues and Challenges addresses specificities of the assessment of damages in investor-state disputes, reflecting the tensions between the sovereignty and self-determination of states and their legal obligations towards foreign investors. These tensions are primarily present in the context of compensation for expropriation, but other commitments of host states undertaken in bilateral investment treaties and contracts with foreign investors may also be in conflict with changing political and economic circumstances. With this background, the calculation of damages becomes a complex endeavor in each case. The lack of valuation principles that are uniformly accepted and implemented leads to uncertainty and unpredictability in practice. The present analysis tries to identify the most important issues and challenges, such as the choice of the valuation date, appropriate valuation methods, moral damages, and the awarding of interest.

Navigational Restrictions within the New LOS Context

Geographical Implications for the United States

Series:

Alexander M. Lewis

Edited by J. Ashley Roach

In 1986, Lewis M. Alexander, a world-renowned marine geographer, prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense a report, Navigational Restrictions within the New LOS Context: Geographical Implications for the United States.

Edited by J. Ashley Roach, the reformatted report is presented in five sections and includes 20 maps, illustrating the world’s international straits and major ocean navigation routes. Forty-three tables present the most comprehensive descriptions of the world’s straits used for international navigation, as well as identify various categories of maritime claims. What made the Report extraordinarily valuable in 1986, and which makes it equally valuable today, is the compilation of geographic data - not available elsewhere - describing the world’s straits used for international navigation and illustrations of the chokepoints and major international shipping trade routes.

Roach has faithfully reproduced Alexander’s seminal work by retaining the original structure and references. A table of defined terms and an index have been added.

Series:

John Dugard

The secession of States is subject to legal regulation. The arguments presented by States in the advisory proceedings on Kosovo confirm that
there are rules of international law that determine whether the secession of a State in the post-colonial world is permissible. These rules derive
from the competing principles of self-determination and territorial integrity. In deciding whether to recognize a secessionist entity as a
State, or to admit it to the United Nations, States must balance these competing principles, with due regard to precedent and State practice.
These lectures examine cases in which secession has succeeded (such as Israel and Bangladesh), in which it has failed (such as Biafra and
Chechnya) and in which a determination is still to be made (Kosovo, Abkhazia and South Ossetia).

The Quest for World Order and Human Dignity in the Twenty-first Century

Constitutive Process and Individual Commitment

Series:

W.M. Reisman

Also available as an e-book

International law’s archipelago is composed of legal “islands”, which are highly organized, and “offshore” zones, manifesting a much lower degree of legal organization. Each requires a different mode of decisionmaking, each further complicated by the stress of radical change. This General Course is concerned, first, with understanding and assessing the aggregate performance of the world constitutive process, in present and projected constructs; second, with providing the intellectual tools that can enable those involved in making decisions to be more effective, whether they are operating in islands or offshore; and, third, with inquiring into ways the international legal system might be improved. Reisman identifies the individual as the ultimate actor in international law and explores the dilemmas of meaningful individual commitment to a world order of human dignity amidst interlocking communities and overlapping loyalties.

Series:

Robert Kolb

Also available as an e-book

L’article 103 de la Charte des Nations Unies touche à la priorité, pour les membres de l’Organisation, des obligations en vertu de la Charte des
Nations Unies par rapport aux obligations découlant de tout autre accord. Cette disposition a constamment gagné en importance dans la pratique
internationale et nationale de ces dernières années. On pense évidemment à la concurrence entre les régimes de sanction des Nations Unies
par rapport aux obligations contenues dans des traités de droits de l’homme. A vrai dire, cette disposition pose toutefois déjà en elle-même
toute une série de questions et de problèmes d’interprétation. Que signifie avoir la primauté? Quelles sont les obligations visées? Qu’en est-il
d’obligations contenues dans des textes juridiquement liés à la Charte? Qu’en est-il d’obligations issues du droit international coutumier? Et
ainsi de suite. Le présent ouvrage cherche en tout premier lieu à donner des éléments d’exégèse de cette disposition importante et difficile du
point de vue juridique, dans les multiples directions dans lesquelles son champ d’application est susceptible de rayonner.

Emmanuel Gaillard

Review excerpts from the book on Scribd

International arbitration readily lends itself to a legal theory analysis. The fundamentally philosophical notions of autonomy and freedom are at the heart of its field of study. Similarly essential are the questions of legitimacy raised by the parties’ freedom to favor a private form of dispute resolution over national courts, to choose their judges, to tailor the procedure and to choose the applicable rules of law, and by the arbitrators’ freedom to determine their own jurisdiction, to shape the conduct of the proceedings and to choose the rules applicable to the dispute.

The present work, based on a Course given at The Hague Academy of International Law in the Summer 2007, identifies the philosophical postulates that underlie this field of study and shows their profound coherence and the practical consequences that follow from these postulates in the resolution of international disputes.

Between Ordinary and Extraordinary

The Normativity of the Singular Case in Art and Law

Series:

Angela Condello

What is the relationship between the general, abstract norm and the singular, concrete case that sometimes affirms a parallel, contrasting, norm? The present essay engages with this question. The argument stems from an analysis of extraordinary singular cases that sometimes emerge, sometimes are “produced” or “promoted” as exemplary (for strategic reasons, like in law). In this essay Angela Condello argues that approaching normativity in art and law from the perspective of the singular case also illustrates the theoretical importance of interdisciplinary legal scholarship, since the singularity creates room for extra-legal values to emerge as legitimate demands, desires, and needs.

What is Art?

The Question of Definition Reloaded

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Tiziana Andina

‘What is art?’ is one of the classic questions that philosophy has addressed over the ages, from the ancients to today. Taking as its starting point debates over the various definitions of art found in history, this article presents and discusses some of the major theories offered by both the analytic and continental traditions. It then looks at the theoretical reasons that led twentieth-century philosophy to reopen the question of definition, and in many cases inquire into the ontology of art itself. Finally, a series of considerations are addressed to help shift the problem of definition onto a new plane, one that is able to respond to the challenges of the performing and participatory arts, which more than any other form of art present particularly unconventional ontologies.

Transboundary Offshore Aquifers

A Search for a Governance Regime

Series:

Renee Martin-Nagle

In Transboundary Offshore Aquifers: A Search for a Governance Regime, Renee Martin-Nagle explains the geologic origins of offshore freshwater aquifers and proposes a governance regime for offshore aquifers that are shared by two or more nations. While the existence of freshwater offshore aquifers under continental shelves has been known for decades, none discovered thus far straddle an international border. In the event that an offshore aquifer shared by two or more nations is identified and targeted for development, selection of a governance regime for the aquifer will present a unique challenge, and several current legal systems could provide valuable guidance. While laws addressing transboundary land-based aquifers are still in a nascent stage, customary international law for surface water has evolved over centuries and could provide analogous rules for development of another freshwater resource. This monograph explores principles for sharing natural resources and proposes a governance regime for transboundary offshore aquifers.

Series:

Emmanuel Gaillard

Also available as an e-book

Le droit de l’arbitrage, plus encore que le droit international privé, se prête à une réflexion de philosophie du droit. Les notions, essentiellement philosophiques, de volonté et de liberté sont au coeur de la matière. La liberté des parties de préférer aux juridictions étatiques une forme privée de règlement des différends, de choisir leur juge, de forger la procédure qui leur paraît la plus appropriée, de déterminer les règles de droit applicables au différend, quitte à ce qu’il s’agisse de normes autres que celles d’un système juridique donné, la liberté des arbitres de se prononcer sur leur propre compétence, de fixer le déroulement de la procédure et, dans le silence des parties, de choisir les normes applicables au fond du litige, soulèvent autant de questions de légitimité.
Le présent ouvrage s’attache à identifier les postulats philosophiques qui sous-tendent la matière, à montrer leur profonde cohérence et les conséquences pratiques qui en découlent dans la résolution des grands contentieux du commerce international.