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L. de Vries and R. de Vries-Wiersma

In this book an outline is given of the morphology of Wambon with an emphasis on placing the data in the wider context of the present typological knowledge about Papuan languages. The descriptions are amply illustrated by examples. These examples, mostly taken from recorded texts, have been provided with word-for-word glosses and English translations. Four Wambon texts complete the description.

Directions for Historical Linguistics

Reprint of the 1968 original

Edited by Winfred Philip Lehman and Yakov Malkiel

This book, a reprint of one of the classics of historical linguistics, contains five papers originally presented at a 1966 symposium at the University of Texas at Austin. The individual contributions cover a broad range of topics, from Ferdinand de Saussure’s influence on historical linguistics to the connection between inflectional paradigms and sound change to language change in contemporary linguistic communities. Each of the contributions has had a sizable effect on the development of linguistics; the final paper, by Uriel Weinreich, Marvin Herzog, and William Labov, for instance, laid the foundation for contemporary historical sociolinguistics. The volume has long been out of print; this new edition will make it accessible to a new generation of linguists.

Series:

Edited by Bart Hollebrandse, Angeliek van Hout and Co Vet

This Cahiers Chronos volume reports on new and ongoing research on tense, aspect and modality in which a variety of languages has been gathered. The languages discussed by the authors include (in alphabetical order): Brazilian Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian and Spanish.
The articles form a selection of the papers presented at the 5th Chronos Conference that took place at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands, in June 2002. We have categorized the papers into three sections: Tense, Aspect and Modality. Obviously, this ordering is somewhat arbitrary given that some of the papers cross these rather rigid boundaries, as they discuss the interplay of tense and aspect or tense and modality.
This book is of interest for scholars in the field of semantics, logic, syntax, and comparative linguistics.

Corpora and Cross-Linguistic Research

Theory, Method, and Case Studies

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Edited by Stig Johansson and Signe Oksefjell

In recent years there has been increasing interest in the development and use of bilingual and multilingual corpora. As Karin Aijmer writes in this book, 'The contrastive or comparative perspective ... makes it possible to dig deeper and to ask new questions about the relationship between languages with the aim of sharpening our conceptions of cross-linguistic correspondences and adding to our knowledge of the languages compared.'
The papers in this volume are a showcase of the great variety of purposes to which bilingual and multilingual corpora can be put. They do not only lend themselves to descriptive and applied approaches, but are also suitable for theory-oriented studies. The range of linguistic phenomena covered by the various approaches is very wide; the papers focus on fields of research like syntax, discourse, semantics, information structure, lexis, and translation studies. The range of languages studied comprises English, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch, and Portuguese. In addition to purely linguistic papers, there are contributions on computer programs developed for the compilation and use of bilingual and multilingual corpora.

Lexis and Texts in Early English

Studies presented to Jane Roberts

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Edited by Christian J. Kay and Louise M. Sylvester

These papers reflect the long and distinguished career of Professor Jane Roberts in the field of medieval English studies, and especially her pioneering work on A Thesaurus of Old English, which provides novel source material for several of the contributions to the volume. Many of the papers deal with aspects of early lexicology and lexicography, while others focus on linguistic and literary features of Old and Middle English texts and their interpretation. They will thus be of interest to researchers in many areas of early English. A special introductory article describes the interlinked development of A Thesaurus of Old English, The Historical Thesaurus of English, and the proposed Thesaurus of Middle English.
Contributors include: Rosamund Allen, Janet M. Bately, Carole P. Biggam, Michelle Brown, Julie Coleman, Janet Cowen, Jodi-Ann George, Joyce Hill, Rosemary Huisman, Giovanni Iarmartino, George Kane, Éamonn Ó Carragáin, Michiko Ogura, Peter Orton, Jeremy J. Smith, E.G. Stanley, Paul Szarmach, Ronald Waldron.

Bells Chiming from the Past

Cultural and Linguistic Studies on Early English

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Edited by Isabel Moskowich-Spiegel and Begoña Crespo-García

To understand the characteristics of present-day English language and culture we must have some understanding of the earlier stages of language use. Bells Chiming from the Past investigates the early development of English and covers different aspects of English medieval studies, from traditional philological concerns, to the most recent perspectives of modern linguistics applied to early English texts. Most of the papers are based on empirical research in English Historical Linguistics, and will contribute substantially to our theoretical and descriptive understanding of English varieties, both written and spoken.
The book focuses on the relationship and interaction of language and culture during the Middle English period. Some of the articles are clearly linguistically-oriented, but most could be included under a wider philological perspective since they study both language and the cultural milieu in which linguistic events took place.
Bells Chiming from the Past is aimed at an international readership and makes a desirable addition to the field of Historical Linguistics, featuring as it does contributions from an array of well-known professionals from different academic and scientific institutions.

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Edited by Emmanuelle Labeau, Carl Vetters and Patrick Caudal

Le système verbal du français contemporain résulte d’une évolution séculaire et l’examen diachronique des valeurs de chacune des formes contribue à la compréhension de la sémantique verbale contemporaine. Parallèlement, l’étude diachronique du système verbal français ne peut se dispenser d’examiner la répartition des valeurs sémantiques sur les formes (avec la diversité d’interprétations contextuelles qu’elles engendrent) au cours de leur évolution. Toutefois, bien que complémentaires, sémantique et diachronie sont rarement conjointes dans la recherche.
Par sa conjonction entre études sémantiques et diachroniques, ce volume présente une meilleure idée des tendances qui caractérisent l’évolution des formes verbales du français, et de l’impact que l’observation de ces tendances peut avoir sur notre compréhension de la sémantique de ces formes en synchronie.

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Edited by Ton Hoenselaars and Marius Buning

The thirty essays in English Literature and the Other Languages trace how the tangentiality of English and other modes of language affects the production of English literature, and investigate how questions of linguistic code can be made accessible to literary analysis. This collection studies multilingualism from the Reformation onwards, when Latin was an alternative to the emerging vernacular of the Anglican nation; the eighteenth-century confrontation between English and the languages of the colonies; the process whereby the standard British English of the colonizer has lost ground to independent englishes (American, Canadian, Indian, Caribbean, Nigerian, or New Zealand English), that now consider the original standard British English as the other languages the interaction between English and a range of British language varieties including Welsh, Irish, and Scots, the Lancashire and Dorset dialects, as well as working-class idiom; Chicano literature; translation and self-translation; Ezra Pound's revitalization of English in the Cantos; and the psychogrammar and comic dialogics in Joyce's Ulysses, As Norman Blake puts it in his Afterword to English Literature and the Other Languages: There has been no volume such as this which tries to take stock of the whole area and to put multilingualism in literature on the map. It is a subject which has been neglected for too long, and this volume is to be welcomed for its brave attempt to fill this lacuna.

Aoristes et parfaits

En français, latin, corse, estonien et polonais

Series:

Edited by Pierre-Don Giancarli and Marc Fryd

Le présent volume regroupe onze contributions centrées sur le parfait et l’aoriste dans cinq langues : Joffre expose l’ambiguïté fondamentale du passif périphrastique et des déponents latins, tandis que Dalbera propose un invariant à son parfait. Giancarli vérifie l’existence d’une corrélation entre la variation d’auxiliaire et celle du participe passé du verbe corse. Le statut de parfait de la construction polonaise avoir + participe + objet est mis en doute successivement par Nowakowska et par Sikora. Treikelder se concentre sur l’émergence du parfait estonien en contexte atypique. En français, Lindschouw & Schøsler envisagent les relations entre circonstants temporels, passé compose et passé simple ; Vetters retrace la dérive aoristique de ce dernier tandis que Apothéloz se refuse à parler d’aoriste.

This volume is a collection of eleven contributions dealing with perfect and aorist tenses in five languages: Joffre shows the fundamental ambiguity of the periphrasis of Latin passive and deponent verbs, while Dalbera proposes an invariant meaning for its perfect. Giancarli tests the hypothesis of a correlation between the variation of auxiliaries and that of past participles in Corsican. The perfect status of the Polish have + participle + object construction is questioned in turn by Nowakowska and Sikora. Treikelder focuses on the Estonian perfect in atypical contexts. Concerning French, Lindschouw & Schøsler look at the relationships between time adjuncts, passé compose and passé simple; Vetters describes the aoristic evolution of the latter, while Apothéloz explains why it should not be considered an aorist.

Contributors are: Denis Apothéloz, Joseph Dalbera, Pierre-Don Giancarli, Marie-Dominique Joffre, Jan Lindschouw, Małgorzata Nowakowska, Lene Schøsler, Dorota Sikora, Anu Treikelder, Carl Vetters.


The Politics of English as a World Language

New Horizons in Postcolonial Cultural Studies

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Edited by Christian Mair

The complex politics of English as a world language provides the backdrop both for linguistic studies of varieties of English around the world and for postcolonial literary criticism. The present volume offers contributions from linguists and literary scholars that explore this common ground in a spirit of open interdisciplinary dialogue.
Leading authorities assess the state of the art to suggest directions for further research, with substantial case studies ranging over a wide variety of topics - from the legitimacy of language norms of lingua franca communication to the recognition of newer post-colonial varieties of English in the online OED. Four regional sections treat the Caribbean (including the diaspora), Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and Australasia and the Pacific Rim.
Each section maintains a careful balance between linguistics and literature, and external and indigenous perspectives on issues. The book is the most balanced, complete and up-to-date treatment of the topic to date.