Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Art History x
  • Public International Law x
Clear All

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established to further in-depth research in the area of international law. The topic for 1992 was La dette extérieure/ The External Debt.
The contents of this volume include:- Bilan de recherches de la section de langue française du Centre d'Étude et de Recherche de l'Académie, par Dominique CARREAU, professeur à l'Université de Paris I.- The Present State of Research carried out by the English speaking Section of the Centre for Studies and Research, by Florentino P. FELICIANO, Associate Justice at the Supreme Court of the Philippines. - Annexe. Liste des participants et sujets traités. - Annex. List of Participants and Subjects Treated.

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established to further in-depth research in the area of International Law. The topic for 1991 was The Legal Implications of 1993 for Member and Non-Member Countries of the EC.
The content of this volume includes:- The Present State of Research Carried Out By the English-Speaking Section of The Centre for Studies and Research, by Alan Dashwood. - Bilan de recherches de la Section de langue française du Centre d'Etudes et de Recherche de l'Académie, par Daniel Vignes. - Annex. List of Participants and Subjects Treated. - Annexe. Liste de participants et sujets traités.

Juricultural Pluralism vis-à-vis Treaty Law

State Practice and Attitudes

Series:

Sandra L. Bunn-Livingstone

The way in which 'legal' culture has been defined in the past has limited comparative processes to law itself. The author proposes a new term, 'juriculture', defined as 'the axiological and behavioural formula which pertains to the law.' This new definition provides a comparative tool which focuses on ontological and epistemological bases of law and concomitant legal theories which are distilled from these philosophical bases, in addition to primary and secondary rules, and written laws. This book tackles the crucial issue of how divergent individual, State, and Regional cultures impact the international legal system in the law and State practice vis-à-vis treaty interpretation and reservations.
An empirical analysis of cases in the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal and six human rights' treaties demonstrate that beyond weak juricultural pluralism, which the international legal system provides for, there is also strong juricultural pluralism, which is not envisaged by the system. This highlights the tension between universality and diversity in both primary and secondary rules, and international law itself. This book is a must for those interested in human rights, treaty law, culture, and legal theory.
'It is very much to Dr. Bunn-Livingstone's credit that she has both seen this crucial problem of modern international treaty law and has set about studying it and dissecting its implications for practice, and the ways in which a degree of legal pluralism in both its weak and strong forms are present in the current international legal system. It is not a task which many international lawyers have shown much appetite to tackle. But that renders this contribution to our knowledge the more important.'
From the Foreword by Sir Robert Y. Jennings, QC

Series:

Edited by Ferdinand J.M. Feldbrugge

This special issue of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW compiles the material published under the head `Russian Federation Legislative Survey' in the six 1993 issues of the journal. It covers Russian legislation from the date of the Declaration of the State of Sovereignty of the RSFSR (12 June 1990) until the end of 1992. The principal watershed in this period was the disappearance of the USSR. This event had far-reaching consequences for Russian law, because of the two-tier character of law in the former Soviet Union: USSR law at the top, and underneath the subordinate legal systems of the individual union republics, including the RSFSR. These consequences can still be felt in many areas, and it will take considerable time and major efforts to replace all USSR law by new Russian enactments.
The Institute of East European Law and Russian Studies intends to bring this survey up to date as soon as possible. This is of course desirable for the practitioner, as well as for the academic user. It is felt, however, that it was imperative to build on a solid foundation, even if it meant some delay in the beginning. As new official sources of legislation emerge, as some already have in 1993, they will be included in the issues of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW. The present survey is a reprint of the fourth issue of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW (1994) and is available gratis to subscribers.

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established for further in-depth research in the area of international law.
The topic for 2006 was: Terrorism and International Law.

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managaing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established for further in-depth research in the area of international law. The topic for 2001 was Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit International et de la Relations Internationales 2001/ Centre for Studies and research in International Law and International Relations 2001.

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established for further in-depth research in the area of international law.
The topic for 2005 was: The Cultural Heritage of Mankind.

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations froms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established to further in-depth research in the area of international law. The topic for 1995 was The International Aspects of Natural and Industrial Catastrophes/ Les aspects internationaux des catastrophes naturelles et industrielles.

Series:

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit

The Centre for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations forms part of the Hague Academy of International Law, and operates under the authority of its managing board and within the framework of its teaching. The Centre was established for further in-depth research in the area of international law.
The topic for 2007 was: Rules and Institutions of International Humanitarian Law Put to the Test of Recent Armed Conflicts .

Series:

Edited by Merris Amos, Jackie Harrison and Lorna Woods

Freedom of expression – particularly freedom of speech – is, in most Western liberal democracies, a well accepted and long established, though contested constitutional right or principle. Whilst based in ethical, rights-based and political theories, such as those of justice, the good life, personal autonomy, self determination, and welfare, as well as arrangements over legitimate government, pluralism and its limits, democracy and the extent and role of the state, there is always a lack of agreement over what precisely freedom of expression entails and how it should be applied. For the purposes of this book we are concerned with freedom of expression and the media with regard to the current application of legal standards and self-regulation to journalistic practice.

Justifications for freedom of expression do, in the end, inevitably involve the conduct of the media and it is this that concerns our authors. This book is concerned with these issues as they affect the contemporary media, the practice of journalism and why imposed constraints and the extent of the freedoms attached to freedom of expression are managed, and why they may or may not be ultimately regarded as legitimate or not legitimate. It is the practical matter of contemporary journalism and freedom of expression that concerns us. Consequently this is not a philosophical work so much as a work concerned with the way that freedom of expression is evoked and applied and those arguments that support or refute such evocation and application, focussing on areas of tension between freedom of expression and other considerations. In short, this is a book concerned with what the various authors regard as good practice as well as what they regard as problematic and why.

Most of the chapters in this book assume a UK regulatory framework, which, influenced by the EU requirements, imposes a differentiated burden on the broadcast media by comparison with the press and, to some degree, content on the Internet.