Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Art History x
  • Air & Space Law x
  • Brill | Nijhoff x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All
In our post-9/11 world, the laws of aviation are under intense scrutiny. From torts law and victim compensation to passenger screening, pilots with guns, and international aviation agreements, the practice of aviation law is burgeoning.
The book, AVIATION LAWS: Cases, Laws, and Related Sources, fills a gap in legal literature. It is directed to both practicing lawyers and to law students. The book introduces all the major areas of air law: International air law regime, crimes involving aircraft, economic regulation of domestic and international air carriage, litigation management, domestic and international liability regimes, governmental immunity from liability, airport law, airline travel restrictions, airport law, insurance, NTSB accident investigation, aircraft financing, FAA regulation of air safety, and airline labor relations. These subjects are presented not only in explanatory text, but also in cases and related source materials. The most important texts are annexed.
The authors, Professors Larsen and Gillick, have regularly taught the course in Air Law at Georgetown University Law Center for more than 30 years. They have long time hands-on experience at the Department of Transportation and in private practice. Professor Sweeney, John D. Calamari Distinguished Professor of Law, has taught the course at Fordham University Law School for 30 years. He also has extensive transportation practice background.

Classroom adoption: $85/copy for 10 or more copies.
Student Edition : 1–57105–340-9, $95/copy

Published under the Transnational Publishers imprint.
Commercial Utilisation from a European Legal Perspective
Currently, perhaps the most complicated and challenging undertaking in outer space is the building of the International Space Station, the ISS. The recent decision to use the ISS also as a facility for pre-commercial research and development in a microgravity environment, inviting commercial enterprise on board, only enhanced such complications and challenges. As a consequence, the major question arises to what extent these are held in check by a sound and effective legal and regulatory regime, e.g. pertaining to criminal liability or intellectual property rights. The present book offers the first overview of applicable law and regulation which is not merely superficial, as well as some directions for future legislative and regulatory developments, written by a number of highly reputed experts in space law. The analysis, finally, is with a clear focus on the European situation in view of the particularities which increasing ESA and EU involvement in space activities bring with them.
Issues of Authorisation of Private Space Activities in the Light of Developments in European Space Cooperation
The increasing involvement of private enterprise in the conduct of space activities raises key issues with respect to international space law which has left it to national law to implement relevant rules vis-à-vis private enterprise. Almost unavoidably, such national implementation regimes differ largely across individual states. This is also true in Europe, where the issue is further compounded by the fundamental – but fundamentally different – roles of ESA and the European Union. Focusing on Europe, the present book thus represents the first comprehensive effort to discuss national authorisation schemes not country by country but theme by theme, so as to allow for a real comparison of the lack of harmonisation or even coordination, and the possible problems which may result.
Second Edition
The flying public, airlines, and governments will all agree on one date that changed commercial flying: that was September 11, 2001. The first edition of Aviation Law: Cases, Laws and Related Sources, described early consequences of that event, particularly compensation of victims and early tightening of aviation security. Subsequently laws and regulations affecting all aspects of aviation changed so rapidly that it became difficult to set a cut-off date for the second edition. The rapid flow of events made an update urgent.

Several gaps in the materials of the first edition became evident as the book was used. The authors filled those gaps, pruned old materials and added much new material describing not only the later developments, but also evolving economics and flight technology.

The objective of the case book is to offer a basic handbook for air law practitioners providing them with a starting point for almost any subject they may encounter. For example, a lawyer specializing in liability law will quickly be able to find basic materials on the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), air carrier licensing, FAA certification, and labor law.
The book continues to present aviation law from the American point of view. Thus the book will be valuable for foreign air lawyers who are guiding foreign airlines in service to the very important North American pool of air traffic. The book also explains the international scene to American air lawyers so that they may guide their clients who provide foreign service.
New chapters on liability for cargo damage and for ground damages have been added and new materials on the legal rights of lessors, successors, actual carriers and code-shares. A chapter on environmental regulation of aviation noise and emissions is also new. All the main subjects listed in the first edition are significantly updated.

The three authors are veteran transportation lawyers and continue their activities in this field.
Assessing the Present and Charting the Future
While decades of space ventures have led to significant technological advances, space activities have also brought increasing environmental problems. This book examines the current international legal regimes in space law and environmental law in order to ascertain their applicability and efficacy in addressing environmental threats in the space sector. The research suggests mechanisms which could improve environmental protection in the sector and strengthen the environmental element in space law. These mechanisms include a variety of norm-setting strategies used in international environmental management. Special attention is drawn to the potential of environmental impact assessment in the space sector and to dispute resolution procedures. Like other areas of human activities, the space sector should accommodate both economic interests and environmental protection in line with the principle of sustainable development
Law of the Sea, Outer Space, and Antarctica
In this fourth installment of the American Classics in International Law series, John Norton Moore approaches what are generally, if perhaps misleadingly, known as “common resources” in international law. The contributions in this volume, reflecting some of the best writing in each area by American international legal scholars, cover the law of the sea, the law of outer space, and the law of Antarctica. While each is a discrete subject area, they have a shared thread of encompassing “common” areas of the oceans, space and the Antarctic continent.

From Jessup's important 1927 piece on Maritime Jurisdiction to contemporary writings on outer space law and the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty, Moore compiles a comprehensive collection of influential American scholarship spanning more than 80 years on the world's shared resources, often revealing the importance of United States foreign policy in the development of each of these areas. Brought together by an Introduction by the Editor, this volume serves as the definitive resource for the American contribution to international law and common resources.