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The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. The main part of the present volume contains the papers of the 2011 Stanford – Vienna Human Rights Conference and focuses on a comparison between US and European approaches to human rights from different perspectives. In addition, this volume of the Review includes the usual parts, ie general articles and the comprehensive digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews, shorter book notes and a selective bibliography on international investment law prepared by the library of the Peace Palace in The Hague.
Editor: Jure Vidmar
This volume focuses on the recent challenge posed by right-wing populism to democratic consolidation in Europe and particularly explores the legal dimensions of this challenge. Part One attempts to define political populism and explains why it poses a challenge to democratic political order in Europe. Part Two examines the theoretical underpinnings of the populist challenge to human rights and democracy in Europe. Part Three applies this theory to concrete examples and considers case studies including an old EU Member State, two newer EU Member States and a non-EU Member State party to the ECHR. The aim is to examin the consequences of the present populist challenge in Europe that has been marked with excessively nationalist policies in some states party to the ECHR. It is explored how the Convention rights have been undermined, but also what the limitations are of the ECHR acting as a safety-net for democratic consolidation in Europe.
Practice and Procedure
Litigation at the International Court of Justice provides a systematic guide to questions of procedure arising when States come before the International Court of Justice to take part in contentious litigation. Quintana's approach is primarily empirical and emphasis is put on examples derived from actual practice. This book is mainly intended to help practitioners and advisors to governments engaged in actual cases and deliberately avoids theoretical discussions, favoring a pragmatic stance that is focused not so much on what authors have to say on any given topic concerning procedure, but rather on presenting, directly “from the Court’s mouth,” as it were, what ICJ judges actually have done and said over the last ninety years concerning such questions.

Editors: Mia Swart and Karin van Marle
The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission was a noble attempt to begin to address the continuing traumatic legacy of Apartheid. This interdisciplinary collection critiques the work of the TRC 20 years since its establishment.
Taking the paralysing political and social crises of the mid-1990s in South Africa as starting point, the book contains a collection of responses to the TRC that considers the notions of crisis, judgment and social justice. It asks whether the current political and social crises in South Africa are linked to the country’s post-apartheid transitional mechanisms, specifically, the TRC.
The fact that the material conditions of the lives of many Apartheid victims have not improved, forms a major theme of the book. Collectively, the book considers the ‘unfinished business’ of the TRC.
Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent
Engaging Self-Centrism from a Plurality of Perspectives
Islam and International Law explores the complex and multi-faceted relationship of international law and Islam both as a religion and a legal order. Current debates on Sharia, Islam and the “West” often suffer from prejudice, platitudes, and stereotypes on both sides. The present book seeks to engage such self-centrism by providing a plurality of perspectives, both in terms of interdisciplinary research and geographic backgrounds. The volume thus brings together 20 contributions from scholars who cover pressing issues in fields such as the use of force in Islamic international law, Islam’s contribution to the development of diplomacy and the rule of law, controversies as to the role of the individual, human rights and international criminal law, as well as Islamic visions of world order in a globalizing world.

Contributors: Awn S. Al-Khasawneh, Asma Afsaruddin, Mohd Hisham Mohd Kamal, Necmettin Kizilkaya, Muhammad Munir, Labeeb Ahmed Bsoul, Khaled Ramadan Bashir, Harriet Rudolph, Irmgard Marboe, Abdulmumini A. Oba, Javaid Rehman, Lorenz Langer, Abdul Ghafur Hamid @ Khin Maung Sein, Mashood A. Baderin, Markus Beham, Matthias Cernusca, Maurits S. Berger, Gregor Novak, Muddathir Abdel-Rahim.
Twenty Years of ICSID Membership
Editors: Wenhua Shan and Jinyuan Su
The first volume in the Silk Road Studies in International Economic Law Series, China and International Investment Law: Twenty Years of ICSID Membership examines cutting-edge issues of international investment law and arbitration in interaction with China, the second largest economy of the world. With particular attention to ongoing major negotiations of bilateral and regional investment treaties, including the TPP, TTIP and China's BIT negotiations with the EU and USA, the collection is timely, thorough, and incisive.

All readers with an interest in the latest developments in international investment law in general, and the Chinese foreign investment regime in particular, will find an indispensable new resource in this collection of essays from esteemed experts in the field.

The volume originated from the "China and ICSID" International Workshop and Roundtable on International Investment Law and Arbitration, organized to commemorate the 20th anniversary of China's accession to the ICSID Convention.
Historical Explorations
International Law and Islam: Historical Explorations offers a unique opportunity to examine the Islamic contribution to the development of international law in historical perspective. The role of Islam in its various intellectual, political and legal manifestations within the history of international law is part of the exciting intellectual renovation of international and global legal history in the dawn of the twenty-first century. The present volume is an invitation to engage with this thriving development after ‘generations of prejudiced writing’ regarding the notable contribution of Islam to international law and its history.
International Law and the Reform of Sharī’a-derived Legislation
The debate surrounding women’s family rights under Sharī’a-derived law has long been held captive to the competing fundamentalisms of universalism and cultural relativism. These two conflicting perspectives fail to promote practical tools through which such laws can be reformed, without prejudice to their religious nature. This book examines the development of Egypt’s Sharī’a-derived family law, and its compatibility with international obligations to eliminate discrimination against women. It highlights the interplay between domestic reform processes, grounded in the tools of takhayyur, talfiq and ijtihad, and international institutions and mechanisms. In attempting to reconcile these two seemingly dissonant value systems, this book underscores the shortcomings of Egypt’s legislation, proposes particular reforms, while simultaneously presenting alternatives to insular interpretations of international women’s rights law.
Some Notes from the Field
Given their relationship to political rhetoric, myths of the Cold War certainly matter today; the legal field is no exception. Although Cold-War studies remains a blooming field, its legal dimensions have not been sufficiently developed. Only recently have legal scholars begun to embark upon research in law and the Cold War and how this area is regarded nowadays, both explicitly and implicitly. Preliminary results show that, on both sides of the Iron Curtain, knowledge of law of the ‘Other’ was encapsulated within two main frameworks: ideological and pragmatic. How did these approaches interrelate and influence one another? Can pure knowledge strictly be divided from contextual conditions? The chapters in this volume present retrospective accounts of actors who have been involved in the circulation of knowledge through the Curtain and, also, research on recent political and legal phenomena echoing the Cold-War discourse.

Contributors: Jane Henderson, Albert J. Schmidt, Zlata E. Benevolenskaya, Leena Lehtinen, Boris N. Mamlyuk, William Partlett, Paul B. Stephan