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Series:

J. M. Pluvier

This book deals with the historical development of South-East Asia (Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines) from the earliest times to the present. In the first section a chronological survey in succinct form of the history of the area is presented so as to provide the reader with the background information necessary to make adequate use of the second section. That part of the book can be used on its own, portraying the history of South-East Asia in 64 pages of maps which cover such items as the formation of states and empires, the migration of peoples, trade routes, cultural and economic aspects, the rise and decline of colonialism and the political development of the post-colonial era. All maps are coloured. The text part places each map in its historical context, providing also lists of kings, presidents etc. It is concluded by an extensive bibliography and by two indexes, one of the geographical names on the maps and in the text and one of the names of the numerous persons mentioned in the text.

Series:

Yuri Bregel

Yuri Bregel’s Atlas provides us with a bird’s eye view of the complicated history of this important part of the Islamic world, which is closely connected with the history of Iran, Afghanistan, China, and Russia; at different times parts of this region were included in these neighboring states, and since 1991 five new independent states emerged in Central Asia: Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan.
Covering the 4th century B.C. to the present, the maps show the various political entities, their approximate borders, the major ethnic groups and their migrations, military campaigns and battles, etc.
Each map is accompanied by a text which gives a concise survey of the main events of the political and ethnic history of the respective period. With special maps on the distribution of the Turkmen, Uzbek, Qazaq, and Qirghiz tribes in the 19th-20th centuries, as well as the location of major archaeological sites and architectural monuments. The last map (Central Asia in 2000) shows existing gas and oil pipelines.

Series:

Cyrus Alai

This volume complements the best-seller and award-winning General Maps of Persia, praised by Dr. John Hébert, Chief of the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress: “This carefully researched work is a must have item in any collection of research materials on the history of cartography... I cannot wait for the arrival of subsequent volumes of further great scholarship and readable map reproductions on other detailed aspects of the history of mapping of Persia.”

Encouraged by numerous commending reviews in five languages – English, French, German, Persian and Armenian – and gratifying testimonials from many renowned authorities in the fields of ‘History of Cartography’ and ‘Iranian Studies’, Cyrus Alai continued his research and collected further material to produce the present volume: Special Maps of Persia, 1477-1925, covering every map of that region, other than general maps. Thus, it not only complements the General Maps of Persia, it is also a completely new volume in its own right and, providing an even closer insight into the region.

The book is divided into nine chapters: Historical Maps, District Maps, Frontier Maps, Town Maps, Political Maps etc. Like the preceding volume, it has a dual character, being both a carto-bibliography and a mapping history of Persia. It contains 761 map-entries, of which 409 are illustrated, mostly in colour. Concise related historical accounts precede every chapter and section, and essential historical notes are also supplied within many of the map entries.

Undoubtedly, this book is a treasure house not just for cartographers, but also historians, social historians, linguists and archaeologists.

Series:

Christian Henriot, Lu SHI and Charlotte Aubrun

The present volume is the first systematic reconstruction of the demographic series of the population of Shanghai from the mid-nineteenth century to 1953. Designed as a reference and source book, it is based on a thorough exploration of all population data and surveys available in published documents and in archival sources. The book focuses mostly on the pre-1949 period and extends to the post-1949 period only in relation to specific topics. Shanghai is probably the only city in China where such a reconstruction is possible over such a long period due to the wealth of sources and its particular administrative history, especially the existence of two foreign settlements.

An Atlas of the World's Conifers

An Analysis of their Distribution, Biogeography, Diversity and Conservation Status

Aljos Farjon and Denis Filer

A 2014 Choice Magazine "Outstanding Academic Title"

An Atlas of the World's Conifers is the first ever atlas of all known conifer species. It is based on locality information of ca. 37,000 collected herbarium specimens held in scientific institutions. As well as providing natural distribution maps for each species, Farjon and Filer give the reader comprehensive insight into the biogeography, diversity and conservation status of conifers on all continents, dispelling the widely held view that they are primarily a northern boreal plant group. Conifer diversity is analysed and presented with a taxonomic and geographic perspective. Distribution patterns are interpreted using the latest information on continental drift, dispersal and phylogeny. The entire dataset supporting the Atlas can be consulted and verified online. These data can also be used for further research and are an invaluable resource for anyone working on conifer systematics, biogeography or conservation.

An Atlas of the World’s Conifers indicates the known distribution of all conifers including an analysis of their biogeography, diversity and conservation status.

Also available from Brill is Aljos Farjon’s A Handbook of the World's Conifers, published in 2010 (ISBN 978 90 04 17718 5) which is a 2017 Choice Magazine "Outstanding Academic Title".

Atlas of the Arabic Dialects of Galilee (Israel)

With Some Data for Adjacent Areas

Series:

Peter Behnstedt and Aharon Geva Kleinberger

This atlas is based on large-scale fieldwork conducted in Galilee in the mid-nineties of last century. Galilee is the area with the highest percentage of arabophones in Israel and displays a rather complex dialectal situation. The reshuffling of large parts of the population after 1948 led to a considerable degree of dialectal diversity in many places. Moreover, many points of investigation show, besides the notorious Bedouin-sedentary dichotomy, a significant sociolinguistic variation with respect to age, sex, and denomination.The atlas contains seventy-three phonetic and phonologial maps, in addition to eighty morphological and thirty-eight lexical maps.Ten maps deal with the classification of the dialects.The atlas is of interest to semitists, dialectologists and variationists.

Series:

Peter Behnstedt

Edited by Gwendolin Goldbloom

Since the author's publication of Die nordjemenitischen Dialekte. Teil 1: Atlas in 1985, a lot of new field work has been done in North Yemen and adjacent areas with new data especially from the extreme north of Yemen and neighbouring areas in Saudi Arabia. These are considered to be the most archaic Arabic dialect areas. The publication of a new atlas of the region in English therefore suggested itself. The atlas consists of 192 fully coloured maps with 30 phonetical and phonological maps, 100 morphological and 60 lexical ones. Depending on the subject the maps are accompanied by shorter or longer commentaries and paradigms. The book is of interest to Arabists, Semitists and dialectologists.