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A Cross-Cultural Parallel Narrative
WINNER! ICQI 2017 Outstanding Book of the Year
WINNER! AERA 2017 Outstanding Publication Award
Power, Race, and Higher Education is a parallel narrative written by two scholars. Kakali Bhattacharya, who is a South Asian woman who immigrated to the United States to pursue her graduate degrees and eventually became an academic. Kent Gillen is a White man who focuses on completing his doctoral studies under Kakali’s supervision. Kent comes to a crossroad where he has to interrogate his sociocultural position, how he benefits from a White supremacist system, even if he did not ask for any of the benefits or had his personal plights. Embedded in the dilemmas are implications for cross-cultural qualitative research, understanding of how whiteness functions, and how we attend to our deepest wounds as we work to become allies and build bridges.
This award-winning book can be used in undergraduate and graduate courses in race and culture studies in the social sciences and humanities, qualitative methods courses, and graduate classes that help students with writing up qualitative research. Individual graduate students and professors who advise graduate students may benefit from this text.
Throughout most of Russian history, two views of who the Russians are have dominated the minds of Russian intellectuals. Westerners assumed that Russia was part of the West, whilst Slavophiles saw Russia as part of a Slavic civilization. At present, it is Eurasianism that has emerged as the paradigm that has made attempts to place Russia in a broad civilizational context and it has recently become the only viable doctrine that is able to provide the very ideological justification for Russia’s existence as a multiethnic state. Eurasians assert that Russia is a civilization in its own right, a unique blend of Slavic and non-Slavic, mostly Turkic, people.
While it is one of the important ideological trends in present-day Russia, Eurasianism, with its origins among Russian emigrants in the 1920s, has a long history. Placing Eurasianism in a broad context, this book covers the origins of Eurasianism, dwells on Eurasianism’s major philosophical paradigms, and places Eurasianism in the context of the development of Polish and Turkish thought. The final part deals with the modern modification of Eurasianism. The book is of great relevance to those who are interested in Russian/European and Asian history area studies.
The Shape of Things to Come
In 2015, Laura Rumbley put forward the notion that higher education—in a highly complex, globally interdependent world—would be wise to commit to an agenda of "intelligent internationalization" (I2). I2 turns on the notion that "the development of a thoughtful alliance between the research, practitioner, and policy communities," in tandem with key decision makers in leadership roles, is essential for institutions and systems of higher education seeking sustained relevance and vitality through their internationalization efforts. Does "intelligent internationalization" make sense? What is faulty, misguided, or missing from this analysis that could be strengthened through further consideration? On the other hand, what speaks to its value as an idea or agenda to advance the way that internationalization is understood and enacted in the world? These issues will be addressed in this book which builds on a 2018 Symposium on Intelligent Internationalization.
Conversations related to epistemology and methodology have been present in comparative and international education (CIE) since the field’s inception. How CIE phenomena are studied, the questions asked, the tools used, and ideas about knowledge and reality that they reflect, shape the nature of the knowledge produced, the valuing of that knowledge, and the implications for practice in diverse societies. This book is part of a growing conversation in which the ways that standardized practices in CIE research have functioned to reproduce problematic hierarchies, silences and exclusions of diverse peoples, societies, knowledges, and realities. Argued is that there must be recognition and understanding of the negative consequences of hegemonic onto-epistemologies and methodologies in CIE, dominantly sourced in European social science traditions, that continue to shape and influence the design, implementation and dissemination/application of CIE research knowledge. Yet, while critical reflection is necessary, it alone is insufficient to realize the transformative change called for: as students, researchers, practitioners and policymakers, we must hear and heed calls for concrete action to challenge, resist and transform the status quo in the field and work to further realize a more ethical and inclusive CIE.

Interrogating and Innovating Comparative and International Research presents a series of conceptual and empirically-based essays that critically explore and problematize the dominance of Eurocentric epistemological and methodological traditions in CIE research. As an action-oriented volume, the contributions do not end with critique, rather suggestions are made and orientations modelled from different perspectives about the possibilities for change in CIE.

Contributors are: Emily Anderson, Supriya Baily, Gerardo L. Blanco, Alisha Braun, Erik Jon Byker, Meagan Call-Cummings, Brendan J. DeCoster, D. Brent Edwards Jr., Sothy Eng, Ameena Ghaffar-Kucher, Jeremy Gombin-Sperling, Kelly Grace, Radhika Iyengar, Huma Kidwai, Lê Minh Hằng, Caroline Manion, Patricia S. Parker, Leigh Patel, Timothy D. Reedy, Karen Ross, Betsy Scotto-Lavino, Payal P. Shah, Derrick Tu, and Matthew A. Witenstein.
The Praxis of National Liberation, Internationalism, and Social Revolution
Narratives of anarchist and syndicalist history during the era of the first globalization and imperialism (1870-1930) have overwhelmingly been constructed around a Western European tradition centered on discrete national cases. This parochial perspective typically ignores transnational connections and the contemporaneous existence of large and influential libertarian movements in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Yet anarchism and syndicalism, from their very inception at the First International, were conceived and developed as international movements. By focusing on the neglected cases of the colonial and postcolonial world, this volume underscores the worldwide dimension of these movements and their centrality in anti-colonial and anti-imperialist struggles. Drawing on in-depth historical analyses of the ideology, structure, and praxis of anarchism/syndicalism, it also provides fresh perspectives and lessons for those interested in understanding their resurgence today.

Contributors are Luigi Biondi, Arif Dirlik, Anthony Gorman, Steven Hirsch, Dongyoun Hwang, Geoffroy de Laforcade, Emmet O'Connor, Kirk Shaffer, Aleksandr Shubin, Edilene Toledo, and Lucien van der Walt.

With a foreword by Benedict Anderson.
Systems in Place and Systems in the Making. Second Revised Edition
Reparations for Victims of Genocide, War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity: Systems in Place and Systems in the Making provides a rich tapestry of practice in the complex and evolving field of reparations, which cuts across law, politics, psychology and victimology, among other disciplines.
Ferstman and Goetz bring their long experiences with international organizations and civil society groups to bear. This second edition, which comes a decade after the first, contains updated information and many new chapters and reflections from key experts. It considers the challenges for victims to pursue reparations, looking from multiple angles at the Holocaust restitution movement and more recent cases in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. It also highlights the evolving practice of international courts and tribunals.
First published in a hardbound edition, this second, fully revised and updated edition, is now available in paperback.
The Construction of Europe in Serbian Culture
The book examines the discursive construction of the representation of “Europe” in the selected writings of leading Serbian writers and intellectuals in the first half of the twentieth century. In addition to being of particular significance in the process of the genesis of our understanding of Europe across the continent, these several decades were crucial for the discursive construction of “Europe” in Serbian culture: when after the end of the Cold War the debate on Europe became possible again, it was on a discursive level to a large extent determined by the stockpile of images and ideas created between the world wars. The book seeks to answer the following questions: who constructed “Europe”, and with what authority? For whom were these constructions intended? How was this representation validated? What purposes was it meant to serve? Which issues were raised in comparing “Europe” with Serbia, and why? Which textual traditions were the elements of this construction borrowed from? How did the construction of the European other define Serbian self-representation? This volume is of interest for all those working in Slavic or East European studies - especially cultural, intellectual and political history of the Balkans - imagology, and European studies.
Les règles et les institutions du droit international humanitaire à l’épreuve des conflits armés récents 2007
This volume is the product of the Centre for Studies and Research of the Hague Academy of International Law for 2007. A total of 23 young academics and practitioners from 16 countries participated in the Centre’s summer session, and all contributed to a very valuable scholarly exploration and exchange of views on a vital topic. The volume consists of the introductory reports of the two Directors of Studies (Professor D. Momtaz of the University of Teheran and Professor M.J. Matheson of George Washington Law School), together with contributions by 13 of the Centre participants that were deemed to be particularly worthy of publication, an extensive bibliography and a general index.
The topic for 2007 was “Rules and Institutions of International Humanitarian Law Put to the Test of Recent Armed Conflicts”. It reflects the fact that international humanitarian law has gone through a period of considerable expansion and development in the past two decades, including the conclusion of several new international humanitarian law conventions and codes of offences, the creation of a number of criminal tribunals
to prosecute international humanitarian law violations, and the effort by the ICRC to produce a comprehensive elaboration of customary law in the field. But the topic also reflects the fact that this body of law has been seriously tested by the armed conflicts of recent years, which have often been vast in scope, long in duration and severe in their human consequences. These conflicts have challenged both the norms themselves
and the new institutions that have been created to enforce them.

Cet ouvrage est le fruit des travaux du Centre d’étude et de recherche de l’Académie de droit international de La Haye de 2007. Un total de vingt-trois jeunes enseignants et praticiens provenant de seize pays différents ont participé à la session d’été du Centre, et tous ont contribué à une exploration scientifique et à un échange de vues d’un grand intérêt sur un sujet essentiel. Ce volume comporte les rapports introductifs des deux
directeurs d’études, ainsi que les contributions de treize participants au Centre qui ont été jugées particulièrement intéressantes pour être publiées, une bibliographie très étendue et un index général. Le sujet choisi pour 2007 a été « Les règles et les institutions du droit international humanitaire à l’épreuve des conflits armés récents ». Ce choix reflète le fait que le droit international humanitaire a connu une période d’expansion et de développements importants au cours des deux dernières décennies, y compris la conclusion de plusieurs nouvelles conventions et codes pénaux en cette matière, la création d’un certain nombre de juridictions pénales pour la répression des violations du droit international humanitaire, et les efforts du CICR en vue de circonscrire le droit coutumier dans ce domaine. Mais le choix de ce sujet reflète également le fait que ce corpus de droit a été sérieusement mis à l’épreuve par les récents conflits armés, lesquels ont souvent été vastes dans leur étendue, longs dans leur durée, et sévères dans leurs conséquences humaines. Ces conflits ont mis au défi à la fois les normes ellesmêmes et les nouvelles institutions créées pour les sanctionner.

Originally published as Colloques / Workshops – Law Books of the Academy, Volume 30.