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Intellectual Advancement Through Disciplinarity

Verticality and Horizontality in Curriculum Studies

Series:

William F. Pinar

Skepticism toward disciplinarity, William F. Pinar points out, is etched deeply in the U. S. field, drawn by progressive education’s efforts to reconfigure the school curriculum as child-centered and/or as focused on social reconstruction. Skepticism toward disciplinarity had also been affirmed by Bobbitt and Charters’ positioning of adult activity as the organizer of the school curriculum. Add to these historical dispositions the contemporary legitimation crisis of the academic disciplines and the rage for interdisciplinary, trans-disciplinary, post-disciplinary—anything but disciplinary—research and curriculum becomes intelligible.
The intellectual labor of understanding constitutes the discipline of disciplinarity. Through the discipline of disciplinarity one contributes to the field’s intellectual advancement and to one’s own. Appreciating the centrality of disciplinarity to intellectual advancement requires us, Pinar argues, to replace Schwab’s syntactical and substantive structures of the disciplines. Focused on methodology and the concepts research methodology generates, Schwab’s schema was more appropriate to the natural and social-behavioral sciences than it is to the humanities and the arts. Pinar replaces these with two structures more appropriate to a discipline associated with the humanities and the arts and focused on the education of the public: horizontality and verticality.
Explicating Spivak’s notion of “planetarity” to specify the structures of subjectivity these structures of disciplinarity invite, Pinar illustrates these concepts through introductions to the scholarship of Ted Aoki, Tom Barone, Mary Aswell Doll, Maxine Greene, James Henderson, Dwayne Huebner, Rita Irwin, David Jardine, Kathleen Kesson, James B. Macdonald, Janet Miller, Marla Morris, Alice Pitt, William Reynolds, John Weaver, among others.
Of significance to all specializations in the broad and fragmented academic field of education, Intellectual Advancement through Disciplinarity provides the intellectual tools by means of which education scholars worldwide can participate in the complicated conversation that is internationalization in order to contribute to the intellectual sophistication of their nationally distinctive fields.

The Language of Science Education

An Expanded Glossary of Key Terms and Concepts in Science Teaching and Learning

Edited by William F. McComas

The Language of Science Education: An Expanded Glossary of Key Terms and Concepts in Science Teaching and Learning is written expressly for science education professionals and students of science education to provide the foundation for a shared vocabulary of the field of science teaching and learning. Science education is a part of education studies but has developed a unique vocabulary that is occasionally at odds with the ways some terms are commonly used both in the field of education and in general conversation. Therefore, understanding the specific way that terms are used within science education is vital for those who wish to understand the existing literature or make contributions to it. The Language of Science Education provides definitions for 100 unique terms, but when considering the related terms that are also defined as they relate to the targeted words, almost 150 words are represented in the book. For instance, “laboratory instruction” is accompanied by definitions for openness, wet lab, dry lab, virtual lab and cookbook lab. Each key term is defined both with a short entry designed to provide immediate access following by a more extensive discussion, with extensive references and examples where appropriate. Experienced readers will recognize the majority of terms included, but the developing discipline of science education demands the consideration of new words. For example, the term blended science is offered as a better descriptor for interdisciplinary science and make a distinction between project-based and problem-based instruction. Even a definition for science education is included. The Language of Science Education is designed as a reference book but many readers may find it useful and enlightening to read it as if it were a series of very short stories.
Cover photo:
The cover photo was taken by W. F. McComas at Marsh’s Library in Dublin, Ireland. This amazing library houses more than 25, 000 rare and important books including many related to the history of science. It was founded in 1701 and has remained essentially unchanged for three centuries. Permission to use this image as the cover for The Language of Science Education has been granted by Dr. Jason McElligott, Keeper of Marsh’s Library.

The Male Clock

A Futuristic Novel about a Fertility Crisis, Gender Politics, and Identity

Series:

William Marsiglio and Kendra Siler-Marsiglio

As speculative fiction informed by social science and biomedical perspectives, The Male Clock propels readers into a futuristic, yet believable world transformed by SGEV—a debilitating virus that drastically compromises men’s ability to procreate. Set mostly in the years 2034-2042, Jordan Giordano, a prominent American journalist, navigates a world steeped in personal misfortune and public controversy. Jordan chronicles his intimate struggle to become a father and family man while doing investigative reporting related to the ever changing social landscape with its radically altered sexual politics, heated public debates, and new technologies. The troubled era is defined by its upswing in baby farming, pharma company transgressions, new S. W. A. T. -based and bioterrorism technologies, sperm retrieval companies, sperm ID cards, devices preventing wet dreams, a surge in lesbian relationships and male prostitution, sperm-donating priests, and more.
Because the novel explores the gendered dimensions to family, interpersonal relations, reproductive and public health, and identity issues it can serve as a provocative supplemental text for diverse courses in sociology, psychology, gender studies, sexualities, history, public health, and related fields. The plot should resonate with young people as well as persons thinking about or trying to have children. Ultimately, The Male Clock will compel people to question how individuals and groups cope with unwanted social change that challenges our identities and social conventions.

The Civic Gospel

A Political Cartography of Christianity

Series:

William M. Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

This book is a result of the times in which we are living. These times demand a response. When the authors began to write this book, it was not popular to dissent against the Bush administration. In fact, dissent was and still is equated with terrorism. Now, it might seem that the tide is turning and maybe after the 2008 election some of this nightmare we have been experiencing will change. At least that is the optimistic view. But there are small traces that the struggle the authors discuss in this book will continue well into the 21st century.
The intermingling of the political and the religious is still swirling in the present context. The Civic Gospel, as the authors discuss it, is the notion that preaching the Gospel is preaching politics and vise versa. This book is about that struggle and the issues related to it.

The Creative Enterprise of Mathematics Teaching Research

Elements of Methodology and Practice – From Teachers to Teachers

Edited by Bronislaw Czarnocha, William Baker, Olen Dias and Vrunda Prabhu

The Creative Enterprise of Mathematics Teaching Research presents the results and methodology of work of the teaching-research community of practice of the Bronx (TR Team of the Bronx). It has a twofold aim of impacting both teachers of Mathematics and researchers in Mathematics Education. This volume can be used by teachers of mathematics who want to use research to reflect upon and to improve their teaching craft, as well as by researchers who are interested in uncovering riches of classroom learning/teaching for research investigations. This book represents the results of a collaboration of instructors discussing their own instruction research, analyzed through a conceptual framework obtained via the synthesis of creativity research and educational learning theories, based upon the work of Piaget and Vygotsky. The editors see an urgent need for creative synthesis of research and teaching, an example of which is presented in the book.
Two central themes of the book are the methodology of TR/NYCity model and creativity, more precisely, creativity of the Aha moment formulated by Arthur Koestler (1964) in a very profound but little known theory of bisociation exposed in his work “The Act of Creation”. Incorporation of the theory of bisociation into classroom teaching of mathematics provides the key to enable students who may struggle with mathematics to engage their own creativity, become involved in their learning process and thus reach their full potential of excellence.
Creativity in teaching remedial mathematics is teaching gifted students how to access their own giftedness.