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  • Author or Editor: Radhika Kanchana x
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Abstract

The paper addresses citizenship access to “outsiders” in Muslim-majority states. In the dominant view, Islamic provisions imply the relegation of unequal rights for non-Muslims, for instance with the traditional dhimmi status. Certainly, the criteria for citizenship acquisition in Muslim countries today show a predominance of the Jus sanguinis principle, which has the effect of excluding non-Muslims. We focus mainly on the states’ practice relating to naturalisation since the mid-twentieth century using a comparative approach. In the first part, there is the observation of a general similarity in naturalisation provisions to resident foreigners across Muslim states. In the second part we analyse the six Arab-Gulf states in closer detail. The conclusion affirms that most Muslim states are inclined to the Jus sanguinis practice. However, they do not take a uniform path. This indicates political considerations in the discrimination or strategy, rather than a rigid formula inspired essentially from religion.

Open Access
In: Migration and Islamic Ethics

Abstract

The paper addresses citizenship access to “outsiders” in Muslim-majority states. In the dominant view, Islamic provisions imply the relegation of unequal rights for non-Muslims, for instance with the traditional dhimmi status. Certainly, the criteria for citizenship acquisition in Muslim countries today show a predominance of the Jus sanguinis principle, which has the effect of excluding non-Muslims. We focus mainly on the states’ practice relating to naturalisation since the mid-twentieth century using a comparative approach. In the first part, there is the observation of a general similarity in naturalisation provisions to resident foreigners across Muslim states. In the second part we analyse the six Arab-Gulf states in closer detail. The conclusion affirms that most Muslim states are inclined to the Jus sanguinis practice. However, they do not take a uniform path. This indicates political considerations in the discrimination or strategy, rather than a rigid formula inspired essentially from religion.

Open Access
In: Migration and Islamic Ethics

Abstract

The United Arab Emirates (UAE), Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, Kuwait and Oman, which are all members of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), stand out globally for their significant reliance on migrant labour and face widespread criticism owing to their generally harsh and abusive work conditions, especially at the lower-wage tiers. The economies in the Arab-Gulf region show a clear pattern whereby capital is concentrated and immobile, and (foreign) labour is imported and subsequently immobilized to achieve a maximum in cheap and flexible manpower. The chapter argues that this is not merely due to the authoritarian and conservative Islamic regimes but that present-day policies (or “no policy” as policy) need to be contextualized in deeper social and historical roots, especially the British colonial legacy including slavery and the long-existing kafala system.

In: Migrant Actors Worldwide