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Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

Elisabeth Günther and Sabine T. Koeszegi

Vienna University of Technology (VUT) has an extremely high student dropout rate of more than 50 percent in its curricula. This study analyses whether and to what extent socio-demographic factors increase the dropout risk at VUT. In particular, the study analyses whether academic integration, measured by several performance indicators, decreases dropout for male and female students in the same way when other factors such as the field of study, age and nationality are controlled. The analysis is based on data from active students enrolled between 1998 and 2010 in thirteen science and technology disciplines. Logistic Regression models estimating the dropout risk for the entire student population show that women face a substantially higher dropout risk than male students. Logistic Regression models for male and female subsamples further show, that academic integration does not reduce the dropout risk for female students to the same extent than it does for male students. Policy makers are well advised to consider diversity aspects in designing curricula and principles of teaching. In order to attract and retain high potential candidates it is necessary to support their social integration at VUT.

The P.E.A.C.E. Pack & S.I.T.E. Software

Interventions to Reduce Bullying in Australian Schools

Jury Mohyla and Phillip T. Slee

Background: The evidence is now quite clear that bullying in schools is an international problem. Bullying is widely regarded as a particularly destructive form of aggression with harmful physical, social and emotional outcomes for all involved (bullies, victims and bystanders), with particular risks for children with special needs. The research of the last 25 years confirms its widespread nature where it is most likely in groups from which the potential victim cannot escape eg schools. In 1994 an Australian Commonwealth Government inquiry, following on from the pioneering work of research documented by Smith, Morita, Olweus, Junger-tas, Catalano & Slee (1999), heralded a growing awareness of the need to address the issue of school violence, particularly bullying. Internationally, researchers, including Smith (2003) have identified the impact of intervention programs to reduce school bullying. In Australia, a nationally and internationally used, systemically based, intervention program called the P.E.A.C.E. Pack, has previously been shown in primary schools to be effective in reducing bullying in primary schools. Synergic Information Technology & Education (S.I.T.E.) software is versatile and multifunctional, and is discussed in detail as a survey instrument that allows a school to administer a survey, collate the data and obtain feedback on student perceptions of bullying in the school.