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  • Author or Editor: Michela Summa x
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Abstract

This chapter discusses the relation between performing and expressing. It takes Judith Butler’s early critique to philosophies of expression as a point of departure in order to investigate whether (i) every philosophy of expression presupposes a substantial and transparent subject and (ii) expression can or cannot be the source of transformation. A closer discussion of the roots of performative theories in ordinary-language philosophy and in cultural anthropology shows that the inquiry into linguistic and more generally social performatives does not rule out expressiveness. Conversely, a phenomenological discussion of expression, mostly inspired by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, allows us to reject the assumption that expression presupposes a substantial and transparent subject and to shed light on the transformative implications of expression. This comparative investigation is not aimed at neglecting the distinction between performing and expressing, but rather at indicating their complementarity.

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise
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Abstract

This chapter discusses the relation between performing and expressing. It takes Judith Butler’s early critique to philosophies of expression as a point of departure in order to investigate whether (i) every philosophy of expression presupposes a substantial and transparent subject and (ii) expression can or cannot be the source of transformation. A closer discussion of the roots of performative theories in ordinary-language philosophy and in cultural anthropology shows that the inquiry into linguistic and more generally social performatives does not rule out expressiveness. Conversely, a phenomenological discussion of expression, mostly inspired by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, allows us to reject the assumption that expression presupposes a substantial and transparent subject and to shed light on the transformative implications of expression. This comparative investigation is not aimed at neglecting the distinction between performing and expressing, but rather at indicating their complementarity.

In: Phenomenology as Performative Exercise