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Editor-in-Chief: Ming-yeh T. Rawnsley
The International Journal of Taiwan Studies, cosponsored by Academia Sinica and the European Association of Taiwan Studies, is a principal outlet for the dissemination of cutting-edge research on Taiwan. Its editorial office is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China (Taiwan) and is hosted by the Centre of Taiwan Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. In 2020, the North American Taiwan Studies Association (NATSA) also invited IJTS to become an affiliate journal. IJTS is the first internationally collaborative, multidisciplinary, and peer-reviewed academic research journal in English dedicated to all aspects of Taiwan Studies, including social sciences, arts and humanities, and topics which are interdisciplinary in nature. This publication on Taiwan Studies, a rapidly growing field with an increasingly critical influence, aims to reach academics and policy makers of different cultural backgrounds, disciplinary perspectives and methodological approaches.

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In this book Sita van Bemmelen offers an account of changes in Toba Batak society (Sumatra, Indonesia) due to Christianity and Dutch colonial rule (1861-1942) with a focus on customs and customary law related to the life cycle and gender relations. The first part, a historical ethnography, describes them as they existed at the onset of colonial rule. The second part zooms in on the negotiations between the Toba Batak elite, the missionaries of the German Rhenish Mission and colonial administrators about these customs showing the evolving views on desirable modernity of each contestant. The pillars of the Toba patrilineal kinship system were challenged, but alterations changed the way it was reproduced and gender relations for ever.
Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics re-examines the relationship between Eurasia’s past and its present by interrogating the social construction of time and the archaeological production of culture. Traditionally, archaeological research in Eurasia has focused on assembling normative descriptions of monolithic cultures that endure for millennia, largely immune to the forces of historical change. The papers in this volume seek to document forces of difference and contestation in the past that were produced in the perceptible engagements of peoples, things, and places. The research gathered here convincingly demonstrates that these forces made social life in ancient Eurasia rather more fitful and its publics considerably more unruly than archaeological research has traditionally allowed.
Contributors are Mikheil Abramishvili, Paula N. Doumani Dupuy, Magnus Fiskesjö, Hilary Gopnik, Emma Hite, Jean-Luc Houle, Erik G. Johannesson, James A. Johnson, Lori Khatchadourian, Ian Lindsay, Maureen E. Marshall, Mitchell S. Rothman, Irina Shingiray, Adam T. Smith, Kathryn O. Weber and Xin Wu.