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  • Author or Editor: Chun-yi Lee x
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Abstract

This report introduces the Taiwan Studies Programme (tsp) at the University of Nottingham and its development in different stages and fields. It also delineates the tsp’s pathways to connect with the academic circle and the general public. Through its online magazine and platform, Taiwan Insight, it has established an online community that has been growing since 2017. The Covid-19 pandemic has helped further expanded tsp’s reach and engagement with its audience through online seminars and workshops. The last part of the report indicates future tasks for the tsp.

In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies
Authors: and

Abstract

This report highlights and offers reflections on three unique features of the fourth World Congress of Taiwan Studies (wcts4) held in Seattle in June 2022. First, following the covid-19 pandemic, wcts4 was one of the first large-scale conferences in the field of Taiwan studies to be held in hybrid mode. Second, although three previous editions have taken place since 2012, wcts4 was the first to be held in the United States. Third, it is the first Congress to launch a major new publication, the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Taiwan Studies. Most media coverage of wcts4 has emphasised only that it was held in the United States. This report goes further, focusing on why it was held in the US, and why Seattle in particular, and on the Congress’s importance more generally to the global field of Taiwan studies.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies
Authors: and

Abstract

The covid-19 pandemic required swift responses from governments at all levels. Government agencies were faced with the immense task of mitigating the health, social, and economic effects of covid-19. These actions and responses included developing mobile phone location tracking systems and ‘electronic fences’ alongside the use of big data analytics. Whether intentionally or not, this led to questions about the rise of the ‘biosurveillance state’. In this paper, we examine the extent to which digital democracy has emerged as a contested concept in Taiwan. Furthermore, we ask: to what extent is the use of digital surveillance for disease control and prevention justifiable, and to what extent can personal privacy be sacrificed when adopting digital surveillance measures with the aim of securing collective safety? We compare Taiwanese citizens’ concerns about personal privacy with those in other democracies, such as the UK, and those in the EU and North America.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies