Suchergebnisse

What is Protestant Art? presents an introduction to Protestant visual culture from the Reformation to the present. Examining historical images as evidence of changing practices and attitudes, Andrew T. Coates explores three major themes in the history of Protestant visual culture: 1) the religious work of images, 2) the relationship between word and image, 3) the power of the Bible and its visual representation. The book analyses images such as prints, paintings, maps of the ‘Holy Land,’ and Bible illustrations to demonstrate the broad range of images that could be classified as Protestant ‘art.’ This work argues that the variety of images and visual practices throughout Protestant history might better be described by the term ‘visual culture’ than ‘art.’
The Cambridge Colloquia
HerausgeberIn: T.J. Cribb
This book is the record of a colloquium held at Churchill College, Cambridge. It pursues lines of discussion radiating out from the core theme of the power of the image (understood in its pictorial, iconic, sensory and verbal senses). Writers, scholars and artists are grouped in pairs representing the two language-cultures (English and French). Central topics covered include the manifold ways in which our readings of pictorial images old and contemporary can bridge cultures, language politics and the politics of culture, the limitless and instructive senses of the concept of the ‘word’, the relation between orality and the written text, the implications of the act of writing, history and opera, the word in theatre, the influence of the Nobel Prize…. The terms of discussion universally urbane, effortlessly wide-ranging and deeply probing. Most importantly – and a reminder of how best to ensure literate wisdom in intercultural debate – is the fact that the contributors gathered here have avoided all ‘pre-packaging’ of their reflections in the shibboleth ‘discourses' (whether Freudian, poststructuralist, postmodern or postcolonial) of our time.
Contributors are: Anthony Kwame Appiah, Biyi Bandele, Jacques Chevrier, Tim Cribb, Irène d’Almeida, Casimir d’Angelo, Assia Djebar, Akin Euba, Christiane Fioupou, Lorna Goodison, Wilson Harris, Marika Hedin, Gerard Houghton, Abiola Irele, Anny King, John Kinsella, Henri Lopés, Daniel Maximin, Femi Osofisan, Niyi Osundare, Ato Quayson, Alain Ricard, Tracy Ryan, Julien Sinzogan, Alioune Sow, Wole Soyinka, George Steiner, Véronique Tadjo, Maria Tippett, Olabiyi Yaï
Literary Representations of Christianity in Late Qing and Republican China contributes to the “literary turn” in the study of Chinese Christianity by foregrounding the importance of literary texts, including the major genres of Chinese Christian literature (novels, drama and poetry) of the late Qing and Republican periods. These multifarious types of texts demonstrated the multiple representations and dynamic scenes of Christianity, where Christian imageries and symbolism were transformed by linguistic manipulation into new contextualized forms which nurtured distinctive new fruits of literature and modernized the literary landscape of Chinese literature. The study of the composition and poetics of Chinese Christian literary works helps us rediscover the concerns, priorities, textual strategies of the Christian writers, the cross-cultural challenges involved, and the reception of the Bible.
Studies in the Cultural History of India
The 31 selected and revised articles in the volume Holy Ground: Where Art and Text Meet, written by Hans Bakker between 1986 and 2016, vary from theoretical subjects to historical essays on the classical culture of India. They combine two mainstreams: the Sanskrit textual tradition, including epigraphy, and the material culture as expressed in works of religious art and iconography. The study of text and art in close combination in the actual field where they meet provides a great potential for understanding. The history of holy places is therefore one of the leitmotivs that binds these studies together.
One article, "The Ramtek Inscriptions II", was co-authored by Harunaga Isaacson, two articles, on "Moksadharma 187 and 239–241" and "The Quest for the Pasupata Weapon," by Peter C. Bisschop.
A Modern Sufi Odyssey
This book demonstrates that the most forceful contribution to George Gurdjieff's world-view is Sufism, understood as the tradition of seeking truth wherever it can be found, especially at the meeting place of the world religions. Gurdjieff's masterpiece, Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, is philosophically analyzed in its use of literary devices to jolt the reader into radical transformation.
Western scholars of ancient Chinese ceramics have long thought blue and white porcelain manufactured before the Ming (1368-1644 A.D.), dates to the Yuan (1279-1368 A.D.). Even in China today these porcelains are still termed “ Yuan Blue and White.” Based upon first-hand surveys of sites in Inner Mongolia, Adam T. Kessler’s Song Blue and White Porcelain on the Silk Road demonstrates that blue and white was made during the Song (960-1279 A.D.) ended up in the hands of the Xi Xia (1038-1226 A.D.) and the Jin (1115-1234 A.D.). Blue and white found today in hoards was buried prior to Mongol invasions of China in the 1200s. Sites from the Philippines to Egypt have yielded Song blue and white. Also reviewed is the cobalt-bearing ore used by Song China to create blue and white.
The knowledge of papermaking spread slowly over Italy from the start of the thirteenth century. Scholarly interest in the history of Italian paper manufacture has concentrated especially on the earliest period. Research into paper from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries has lagged somewhat behind. Watermarks are extremely important for investigating the origins of paper. This book offers high quality x-rays and descriptions of ca. three hundred Italian watermarks. A selection of paper produced in different areas of Italy is presented with an identification.
HerausgeberInnen: Wolfgang Asholt und Hans T. Siepe
Les avant-gardes inventent dès leur début au XXe siècle des politiques et une forme spécifique du politique, et le surréalisme va le plus loin dans l'interpénétration des domaines politiques et artistiques. A la différence des autres mouvements d'avant-garde historiques, le modèle du surréalisme est encore un défi pour nombre d'écrivains et d'artistes d'aujourd'hui, et ne serait-ce qu'en tant que mort-vivant. Voulant reconduire l'art dans la vie, donc aussi dans la politique et le politique, le surréalisme envisage une transformation de la société mais se révèle finalement résistant contre tous les totalitarismes.
Les contributions de ce volume analysent selon quelle politique artistique le surréalisme peut établir et pratiquer cette position politique, unique dans l'art et la littérature du XXe siècle. Ils abordent ce sujet de perspectives théoriques et médiatiques et des points de vue de la littérature, de l’art, de l’histoire et de la communication. Les essais s'occupent aussi bien de sujets, d'oeuvres et d'auteurs représentatifs du surréalisme historique que du surréalisme d'après-guerre et de sa réception d'aujourd'hui. Ils posent ainsi la question de la nécessité et des possibilités d'un nouvel engagement politique de l'art et de la littérature contemporains.
New Studies on Northern Britain in the Middle Ages
This publication is the culmination of an extended programme of conferences that have sought to mark the contribution of F. T. Wainwright to Pictish studies and, in particular, the 50th anniversary of The Problem of the Picts. The book is firmly in the tradition of interdisciplinary scholarship Wainwright did so much to promote and brings together much fresh thinking on the archaeological, art-historical, place name and historical understanding of Northern Britain in the second half of the first millennium AD. Within a wider, European framework it addresses questions of landscape, material culture and mentalities, revealing some of the different strategies by which the Picts made their world. All the studies are accessibly presented to serve the interests of students, teachers and anyone interested in the roots of European civilisation.
Contributors are Barbara E. Crawford, Nicholas Evans, Iain Fraser, James Fraser, Meggen Gondek, Stratford Halliday, Andrew Heald, Kellie Meyer, Gordon Noble, Robert D. Stevick, Simon Taylor and Sarah Winlow.
HerausgeberInnen: Kính T. Vũ und André de Quadros
Displacement, relocation, dissociation: each of these terms elicits images of mass migration, homelessness, statelessness, or outsiderness of many kinds, too numerous to name. This book aims to create opportunities for scholars, practitioners, and silenced voices to share theories and stories of progressive and transgressive music pedagogies that challenge the ways music educators and learners think about and practice their arts relative to displacement.
Displacement is defined as encompassing all those who have been forced away from their locations by political, social, economic, climate, and resource change, injustice, and insecurity. This includes:

- refugees and internally displaced persons;
- forced migrants;
- indigenous communities who have been forced off their traditional lands;
- people who have fled homes because of their gender identity and sexual orientation;
- imprisoned individuals;
- persons who seek refuge for reasons of domestic and social violence;
- homeless persons and others who live in transient spaces;
- the disabled, who are relocated involuntarily; and
- the culturally dispossessed, whose languages and heritage have been taken away from them.

In the context of the first ever book on displacement and music education, the authors connect displacement to what music might become to those peoples who find themselves between spaces, parted from the familiar and the familial. Through, in, and because of a variety of musical participations, they contend that displaced peoples might find comfort, inclusion, and welcome of some kinds either in making new music or remembering and reconfiguring past musical experiences.

Contributors are: #4459, Efi Averof Michailidou, Kat Bawden, Rachel Beckles Willson, Marie Bejstam, Rhoda Bernard, Michele Cantoni, Mary L. Cohen, Wayland “X” Coleman, Samantha Dieckmann, Irene (Peace) Ebhohon, Con Fullam, Erin Guinup, Micah Hendler, Hala Jaber, Shaylene Johnson, Arsène Kapikian, Tou SaiKo Lee, Sarah Mandie, David Nnadi, Marcia Ostashewski, Ulrike Präger, Q, Kate Richards Geller, Charlotte Rider, Matt Sakakeeny, Tim Seelig, Katherine Seybert, Brian Sullivan, Mathilde Vittu, Derrick Washington, Henriette Weber, Mai Yang Xiong, Keng Chris Yang, and Nelli Yurina.