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Author: Sandra Gambetti
Scholars have read the Alexandrian riots of 38 CE according to intertwined dichotomies. The Alexandrian Jews fought to keep their citizenship - or to acquire it; they evaded the payment of the poll-tax - or prevented any attempts to impose it on them; they safeguarded their identity against the Greeks - or against the Egyptians. Avoiding that pattern and building on the historical reconstruction of the experience of the Alexandrian Jewish community under the Ptolemies, this work submits that the riots were the legal and political consequence of an imperial adjudication against the Jews. Most of the Jews lost their residence never to recover it again. The Roman emperor, the Roman prefect of Egypt and the Alexandrian citizenry - all shared responsibilities according to their respective and expected roles.
Author: Sandra Gambetti

The fragmentary state of Ezekiel’s Exagoge unfortunately prevents its readers from formulating firm theses about the play’s cultural function and general significance. However, it remains possible to formulate well-reasoned hypotheses and thereby stimulate further research on this fascinating text. This article discusses the political significance of the Exagoge through the exploration of five different hypotheses stemming from as many possible historical scenarios of the mid-second cent. B. C. E. within which Moses, the tragic hero of the play, could have acquired particular relevance. The “Mosaic constituencies,” whose political interests Ezekiel may have addressed by writing his play, are either the Oniads or the Samaritans or the Hasmoneans.

in Journal of Ancient Judaism
in Journal of Ancient Judaism