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In: Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648)
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The Thirty Years’ War led to enormous devastation, but it also induced widespread movement and led to encounters of people with different faiths and mindsets. Accounts of members of religious orders in Bavaria note not only brutality but also curiosity and exchange of knowledge in these meetings of people from diverse countries and cultures. Their stories attest that, in some cases, religious stereotypes could recede and provide space for new ways of seeing and knowing.

In: Daphnis
In: Continuity and Change: The Harvest of Late-Medieval and Reformation History
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Abstract

Approaches to death during the Thirty Years’ War reveal several cardinal characteristics evident during the early modern period in general. Being prepared for death ideally took place along two temporal trajectories: first, the long-term, i.e., life-long grounding of one’s life in prayer and in the service to Christ, and, second, the generally short-term, final period leading up to one’s death, which included perpetual prayers and songs, reading of biblical texts, and spiritual conversations. Awaiting death patiently and fully aware, the dying were to face the hour of death calmly and peacefully. The war, however, heightened anxieties around these last moments of life. The fear of a violent death on the battlefield or during an attack on civilians thwarted a dignified and well-prepared departing at home surrounded by loved ones. Importantly, it was not death itself people were afraid of, but the circumstances under which they died and whether they were worthy enough to enter the heavenly kingdom. The use of torture represented a particularly gruesome example of destroying the honor and ritual of death. Someby chose martyrdom, which immediately assured one a place in heaven. Besides fear, one can also find a profound joy among the dying. During the for many destructive years of the war, the prospect of leaving this vale of tears made some contemporaries break out in joy and laughter, while inviting those left behind to be glad for them.

In: The Moment of Death in Early Modern Europe, c. 1450–1800
In: In the Shadow of "Savage Wolves"
In: In the Shadow of "Savage Wolves"
In: In the Shadow of "Savage Wolves"
In: In the Shadow of "Savage Wolves"
In: In the Shadow of "Savage Wolves"