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A Study of Its Social Systems, Dimensions, Forms and Indicators
Milan Zafirovski identifies and investigates the resurgence of capitalist dictatorship in contemporary society, especially after 2016. This book introduces the concept of capitalist dictatorship to the academic audience for the first time. It examines the capitalist dictatorship as a total social system composed of specific systems such as a coercive economy, repressive polity, illiberal civil society and irrational culture in contrast to liberal democracy. It also investigates multiple dimensions, forms and indicators of capitalist dictatorship, and calculates degrees of capitalist dictatorship for contemporary Western and comparable societies such as OECD countries. Capitalist dictatorship, including autocracy, Zafirovski argues, is the gravest threat to contemporary democratic society post-2016.
Freedom, Liberalism and Anti-Liberalism in the 21st Century
This is a book about modern liberal society and its adversaries. The book rediscovers and rehabilitates much maligned, especially in America, liberalism as the ideal system of liberty in relation to anti-liberalism as one of un-freedom. It rediscovers liberal modernity as a free, equal and just social system and time, thus most compatible with and enhancing of human civilization ushering in the 21st century. It exposes anti-liberal adversaries, especially conservatism, as ideologies and systems most inappropriate with and destructive of civilization. The book rediscovers liberal modernity as the master process and destination of Western civilization, and its anti-liberal adversaries, notably conservatism, as the ghosts of a dead past. The anti-liberal rumors of the ‘death’ of liberalism are ‘greatly exaggerated’.
The Calvinist Predestination of a New Society
This book is a sociological analysis of the relationship between modern society, in particular America, and Calvinism in the Weberian tradition. While the book continues this tradition, it further expands, elaborates on, and goes beyond earlier sociological analyses. The book examines the impact of Calvinism on modern society as a whole, thus extending, elaborating on, and going beyond the previous analyses of the influence of the Calvinist religion only on the capitalist economy. It analyzes how Calvinism has determined most contemporary social institutions, including political, civic, cultural, and economic, in its respective societies, particularly, through its derivative Puritanism, America. For that purpose, the book applies the idea of the destiny of societies or nations to American society in particular. It argues, demonstrates, and illustrates the Calvinist societal "predestination", through the Puritan determination, of American society .
This book argues and demonstrates that fascism did happen in contemporary society such as especially America, as during post-2016. It classifies and discusses the main elements of fascism to see if these reveal and replicate themselves in America post-2016. It discovers the specific syndromes of fascism in America post-2016 that reveal and replicate universal fascist features. It detects the main social causes of fascism in America post-2016. It identifies primary counterforces to fascism in America and elsewhere. Lastly, the book constructs a composite fascism index and calculates fascism indexes for Western and comparable societies like OECD countries. These indexes provide suggestive evidence that fascism happened in America and other OECD countries, even if not in Western Europe, especially Scandinavia.

The paper seeks to help correct a certain imbalance in the sociological literature on Calvinism and its derivations like Puritanism, neo-Calvinism, etc. This is the literature’s centering on Calvinism’s various social consequences and decentering on its own origins and conditions in society. As a corrective to this asymmetry in the literature, the paper assumes and explores the societal roots and factors of the emergence and early development and expansion of Calvinism. This is done on the grounds that the analysis of the societal determination, i.e., the point of origin of Calvinism, like other religion and ideology, is equally and even more important than that of its social effects or destination. In formal terms, the paper considers Calvinism to be a dependent variable, function of certain societal determinants and settings as the explanatory factor, thus correcting the prevalent treatment of it as the independent variable in the sociological literature. In so doing it adopts and applies the main premises and findings of the sociology of religion and knowledge to Calvinism. Its aim is to contribute to a more complete sociology of the Calvinist religion that explores both its social conditions and its social consequences.

In: Comparative Sociology

Abstract

The paper identifies and analyzes what it denotes the generalized low-quality syndrome of the US economy compared with other advanced economies in light of its recent and continuing quality problems. It first posits and demonstrates the existence of the generalized low-quality syndrome in the US economy presenting certain aggregate and specific indicators. Then it explores the effective or possible causes and explanations of the generalized low-quality syndrome, such as the exceptional structural-institutional properties and outcomes of the US economy. In general, the paper finds and infers that the overarching factor and predictor of the generalized low-quality syndrome of products, especially manufactured durable goods, is the structural property of the US economy and in extension the quality of life in American society in comparative sociological perspective by being compared to other Western societies.

In: Comparative Sociology

Abstract

This paper reexamines the concept and determinants of happiness within global society involving Western and comparable societies such as OECD countries. The review of the literature suggests that it leaves a certain void with respect to the bearing of types of contemporary societies on happiness and its societal conditions. The paper argues that a particular type of these societies, denoted as the combination of welfare capitalism and liberal democracy, tends to create the best societal conditions for a happier society than do other types, such as those described as the compound of oligarchic-plutocratic capitalism and illiberal ‘democracy’ and mixed social systems. It then presents varied evidence in strong support of the argument demonstrating that this type of society is the most successful in creating objective conditions for realizing the ideal of the ‘greatest happiness to the greatest number’ of its members compared to its opposite and mixed alternatives. The paper concludes that the evidence strongly confirms that welfare capitalism/liberal democracy functions as the strongest determinant and predictor of the happiness of societies today.

In: Comparative Sociology
In: Modernity and Terrorism
In: Modernity and Terrorism
In: Modernity and Terrorism